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Deprivation

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Infusion pump feeding IV drip into patients arm

Some people with cancer in the UK are struggling more than others to get access to treatment. But what is causing this unwarranted variation in access to treatment, and how can we makes things better? Some people with cancer in the UK are struggling more than others to get access to treatment. But what is causing this unwarranted variation in access to treatment, and how can we makes things better?

by Emily Eagles, Lyndsy Ambler | Analysis | 23 February 2024

23 February 2024

broken cigarette on yellow background

Cancer Research UK's latest analysis has revealed that the most deprived of the population in England won’t be smokefree until after 2050. Cancer Research UK's latest analysis has revealed that the most deprived of the population in England won’t be smokefree until after 2050.

by Sophie Wedekind | News | 28 September 2023

28 September 2023

Three people walking along a road

Ian Walker, Executive Director of Policy, Information and Communications, writes about some of the recent inequalities progress at Cancer Research UK Ian Walker, Executive Director of Policy, Information and Communications, writes about some of the recent inequalities progress at Cancer Research UK

by Ian Walker | Opinion | 2 August 2023

2 August 2023

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Health inequalities
This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Health inequalities
Illustration showing inequalities.

We talk to Professor Sir Michael Marmot, who's been at the forefront of health inequality research for decades, to discuss what it is and how we can reduce it. We talk to Professor Sir Michael Marmot, who's been at the forefront of health inequality research for decades, to discuss what it is and how we can reduce it.

by Harry Jenkins | Analysis | 15 February 2022

15 February 2022

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Health inequalities
Cancer Research UK logo

Bowel cancer patients living in the most deprived areas are 24 per cent more likely to die within five years of treatment than their more affluent neighbours and this difference appears to be a result of excess deaths within the first 30 days following surgery to treat the disease. Bowel cancer patients living in the most deprived areas are 24 per cent more likely to die within five years of treatment than their more affluent neighbours and this difference appears to be a result of excess deaths within the first 30 days following surgery to treat the disease.

by The National Cancer Intelligent Network | News | 14 June 2012

14 June 2012