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Screening

Showing 12 out of 300 results
Squamous epithelial cells of human cervix under the microscope view.
  • Health & Medicine
  • Science & Technology

70 years of progress in cervical cancer research

25 years ago, our scientists showed that nearly all cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). But that’s not where our story with cervical cancer research starts, and it certainly isn’t where it ends. 25 years ago, our scientists showed that nearly all cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). But that’s not where our story with cervical cancer research starts, and it certainly isn’t where it ends.

by Jacob Smith | In depth | 17 June 2024

17 June 2024

A computer-generated images showing a DNA double-helix in a blood sample

Multi-cancer tests have the potential to detect multiple cancer types from a single sample. There's a lot to learn before we can use them. Multi-cancer tests have the potential to detect multiple cancer types from a single sample. There's a lot to learn before we can use them.

by Jessica Lloyd, Alice Brookes | In depth | 12 June 2024

12 June 2024

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Multi-cancer tests
Anna Housley and her husband Tom. The BCAN-RAY project found that Anna has an increased risk of developing breast cancer. She now gets yearly mammograms.

One year in, the research project launched in memory of Sarah Harding is identifying younger women who may have a higher breast cancer risk. One year in, the research project launched in memory of Sarah Harding is identifying younger women who may have a higher breast cancer risk.

by Tim Gunn | News | 30 May 2024

30 May 2024

This photo shows a mammographer with a patient, wearing a hospital gown, before a mammogram.

Getting the right tests, in the right place and at the right time to patients is crucial, but at the moment too many people are waiting too long to be diagnosed with cancer. So here we summarise what’s holding us back, and highlight five things a post-election UK Government could do to get cancer diagnostics back on track. Getting the right tests, in the right place and at the right time to patients is crucial, but at the moment too many people are waiting too long to be diagnosed with cancer. So here we summarise what’s holding us back, and highlight five things a post-election UK Government could do to get cancer diagnostics back on track.

by Alice Hilborn | Analysis | 13 May 2024

13 May 2024

Two people sitting talking to a GP

Cancer screening saves thousands of lives each year. Here are our top tips for making the screening process just a little bit easier. Cancer screening saves thousands of lives each year. Here are our top tips for making the screening process just a little bit easier.

by Sophie Brooks | In depth | 9 April 2024

9 April 2024

A man talking to a GP

Why isn’t there a screening programme for prostate cancer? Here, we take a look at some of the latest research into PSA testing to find out.  Why isn’t there a screening programme for prostate cancer? Here, we take a look at some of the latest research into PSA testing to find out. 

by Amy Warnock | Analysis | 6 April 2024

6 April 2024

Stained cervical cells viewed under the microscope

22-28 January is Cervical Cancer Prevention Week. To recognise that, we’ve compiled some of our most useful content on cervical cancer, from research in the lab to screening in the clinic, to get you up to date on how we can prevent cervical cancer. 22-28 January is Cervical Cancer Prevention Week. To recognise that, we’ve compiled some of our most useful content on cervical cancer, from research in the lab to screening in the clinic, to get you up to date on how we can prevent cervical cancer.

by Jacob Smith | Analysis | 22 January 2024

22 January 2024

An image of a capsule sponge, a test for Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal cancer

Our BEST4 trial will show if a capsule sponge test can be used to monitor people at high risk of oesophageal cancer. It could give the NHS a quick and simple new screening test for oesophageal cancer and save thousands of lives every year.  Our BEST4 trial will show if a capsule sponge test can be used to monitor people at high risk of oesophageal cancer. It could give the NHS a quick and simple new screening test for oesophageal cancer and save thousands of lives every year. 

by Tim Gunn | Analysis | 11 January 2024

11 January 2024

A GP examining a patient.

Why do some cancers, and some groups of people, tend to be diagnosed later? Here's our investigation into inequalities in early diagnosis. Why do some cancers, and some groups of people, tend to be diagnosed later? Here's our investigation into inequalities in early diagnosis.

by Hope Walters | In depth | 23 November 2023

23 November 2023

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Health inequalities