Skip to main content

Together we are beating cancer

Donate now

Our 2010 advertising campaign – tell us what you think

by Henry Scowcroft | Analysis

11 July 2010

424 comments 424 comments

We’ve just launched our new advertising campaign. You can watch it here:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhYmGx9q7v4]

Support us now

There are no actors in the advert. Instead, real cancer survivors and patients talk about the impact Cancer Research UK has had on their lives, while some of the cancer doctors we fund talk about their research.

Our aim is to show the progress we’re making in the fight against cancer, whilst highlighting the need to continue our work. You can find out more about the campaign and how you can support us on our website.

The ad will first be broadcast during Monday night’s Coronation Street, on ITV1 at 8.45pm.

We’d really like to know what you think, so we can continue to improve the way we communicate and discuss cancer. So please do leave your comments in the box below.

If you’d like to know more about the progress we’ve made and the work still to be done please visit aboutus.cancerresearchuk.org/what-we-do/research/


    Comments

  • Laura
    24 September 2010

    I personally do not like this advert. My mum was diagnosed 5 years ago now, and went through absolute hell, still going through injections and treatment now, i feel this advert is very harsh, especially ending the advert with basically ‘the cancer is back’ and that is it!

    I realise how much this charity does for people and have fully supported it and many others over the years. The main point of the advert is to shock people and make people aware, which is fantastic.

    However,the message that should be promoted should be mainly hope and how money that is raised can help people and maybe change peoples lives for the better. After watching that advert i felt even more worried and panicy about my mums future health than i already was.

    Most of the people i have spoken to about this, family and otherwise, agree with my view.

  • stephen cooke 22
    4 September 2010

    i agree with you sarah, its harsh but it needs to be to try and make people aware,… there is help for all patients and the partners of patients because it affects theire life aswell,

  • sarah harding 38
    3 September 2010

    The c word is horrible but people are diagnosed with it every day. I was with breast cancer at the age of 34, my life fell apart but if i wasn’t breast aware by seeing adverts i wouldn’t of reacted so soon. People need to know that any one can get cancer but by people supporting it we can all help each other. The advert is full of facts. Such as “your not on your own” “it can affect any one at any age” “there is support out there” “and that people all over the world help to find more treatments and cures”. its about us all coming together and the advert shows that. I get really upset when i see anything to do with cancer, but its life and needs to be shown. Sorry i’ve gone on a bit but its close to my heart as it is with thousands of other people.

  • stephen cooke 22
    26 August 2010

    i know how people can get upset at the advert but it has to make that impact to show you what its like for cancer patients like me, it is harsh and horrible but with the help of good people we can get through this alot easier, everytime i see something to do with cancer i get upset so i know how people dont like to see it on the tv. but it needs to be shown

  • stephen cooke 22
    26 August 2010

    I think this is a great advert it really hits home what it means, i had stomach cancer and im 22, i am greatfull,to the people who donate money..youre the people who saved my life, Cant thank you enough

  • Henry Scowcroft
    25 August 2010

    We’re very sorry to hear that people have been upset by our recent ad. As Carolan said in her comment on July 12, we try to be as sensitive as we can in our advertising and didn’t set out to make an ad that was upsetting, but rather one that showed the reality of cancer.

    Anyone going through cancer wants to have hope that there will be a way of treating their cancer successfully, and this is very much the case with Ann, the woman featured at the end of the ad, who has not in any way lost hope and who has received many positive comments following her involvement in the campaign.

    Hope, bravery and strength are key themes of the campaign and although Cancer Research UK has given hope to more people through being at the heart of the work that has seen survival rates double over the past forty years, the reality is that there is still much more to be done.

    Henry
    Cancer Research UK

  • Frances
    20 August 2010

    The ad starts out positively, showing the great advances that have been made in dealing with cancer and wonderful results achieved. However, as someone who has a loved-one going through this disease at the moment, please spare a thought for present patients. The ending isn’t positive and takes away hope, which is too much to lay on people who are bravely fighting this disease, especially those who have been told “It’s come back”. Please re-think the ending and alter it. It hits those you are trying to help too hard.

  • M J Clark
    20 August 2010

    I am behind your advert campaigns and agree that it is important to get a strong message across, but to me this advert is brutal and quite negative. My mum had breast cancer a few years ago. Her experience with treatment and prognosis were highly positive – a side which features occasionally in your adverts but should be far more prominent.

    Coming from a small family where cancer has unfortunately featured in our lives with my mum’s diagnosis, this advert takes us back to a place we don’t want to go. You are giving across a message that cancer never goes away, which implies that it’s won! My mum, although losing her hair, lead her life to the full throughout her treatment and didn’t get sick. Her routine was largely the same and she returned to work halfway through.

    I realise, unfortuantely, that this is not the case for so many others who have lost people through cancer or suffered it themselves. Many of these people are aware of the brutalities and the need for donations or awareness without this stark, uncompromising message from such a great foundation.

    Even people who have not been directly affected by cancer see it is a daunting, terrifying illness, and are aware of these facts. It is a cruel disease, everyone knows, so please don’t disturb viewers with this message. I see my mum visibly distressed by this advert when we would rather see the future as positive as much as it is, as you state, uncertain. As family, it makes us anxious. Even before my mother suffered from the disease I would have felt at a state of unease watching. I find it offputting. Far too little people know the stories of survival – why do we concentrate on the negative?

    Sorry to be so negative but stories of survival and triumph can be every bit as touching and effective in your campaign as laying the emotions on thick. As much as I know people who have passed away through this condition, I know an equal amount of people who have gone on for decades stronger than before. We need to raise THAT awareness. Thanks!

  • lesley phelps
    12 August 2010

    Having worked in oncology for over twenty years i agree it is hard hitting but i know of patients who have gone through hell and back with major major sugery, chemo and radiotherapy and don’t want to hear that it could all come back. Some patients haven’t got the strength to go thro it all again but would be nice if you could end on a positive note. Keep up the good work.

  • sharon jones
    7 August 2010

    At the end of the day, it really doesn`t matter what cancer you have, cancer is cancer whatever part of your body it chooses to infest. Lets find a cure whatever it takes. A cancer survivor.

  • david felton
    7 August 2010

    this ad realy hits hard to those with cancer there children are realy very upset by this ad only those who have cancer will realy understand what im saying how distresed the suferers are and there children when they see this ad. THE PROBLEM IS THAT THOSE WITHOUT CANCER DONT GET AFECTED LIKE THIS BY YOUR AD >PLEASE DONT TARGET CANCER SUFERERS >TRY AND TARGET THE WIDER POPULATION>thats why on here theres only cancer suferers talking about it .Your targetting the wrong people. Dave Felton

  • Chris
    3 August 2010

    The campaign is a disgrace!

    The business of fund raising for charities is a tough one and needs be run as such.

    However when a charity like Cancer Research UK takes a decision to raise funds at the expense of the very people it is trying to help, it has lost the plot. Remission is a cause for hope and these hopes should not be dashed by thoughtless ad men.

    Hope is a much stonger message than despair – particularly when you are in the middle of a fight against the disease.

    I have consistently contributed over the years but will not do so now. My support will go to other cancer charities that target specific conditions and have not let corporate desire replace compassion.

  • Heather Wilde
    2 August 2010

    Totally agree with Ali on the 23rd July. My 21yr old son was diagnosed with NHL last November. This morning heralded an important CT scan to see if he is still in remission and if he can return to his golf + college in the USA. He saw your thoughtless new ad last night and consequently had no sleep. Yes we realise that cancer can come back and yes money is important to research but you have disregarded the collateral damage that such a campaign can inflict. My family has poured thousands into Cancer Research over the years. My mother died of ovarian cancer, my best friend of breast cancer. Surely it is those that will be most affected by your current advertising campaign that have poured money into your organisation NOT those who HAVE NOT been affected. Show some sort of understanding of the plight of the hundreds who are most likely to be watching such a wretched advert at that time of night. You might argue that this is the reality but the reality is that your campaign destroys hope for the thousands who have just been given hope of remission

  • gail mc grenaghan
    1 August 2010

    thinks this is a really effective ad. think there may be another version though,think I saw one on tv recently with john hartson at the end, am I imagining this? Everyone has had some contact with cancer and this is made evident in the ad. It can affect anyone at any time there are no exceptions.

  • Derek
    31 July 2010

    I have recently been treated for cancer at the base of my tongue. I will ” celebrate ” one year next week since being told that treatment was successful.
    Your advert , which I saw for the first time tonight , has upset me greatly , the last thing I want to hear is, It’s come back . We all know this is a possiblity , but it’s not nice being reminded on the TV.

  • Paul
    29 July 2010

    I mean prostate, not prostrate! For some reason I always type it incorrectly …

  • Paul
    29 July 2010

    A good advert but why no mention of prostrate cancer, the most common cancer in men? If anything this advert, and other like it, really, really need to raise awareness of prostrate cancer. An opportunity missed.

  • Mr Leslie Walker
    29 July 2010

    I have just seen your email link to your TV add and agree in general to the comments made. But I feel that there is also the need for more awareness to know more about the symptoms especially for ovarian cancer.My wife died from this terrible illness in 2006. Distraught I tried to bring this to people by creating my WebSite that same year to appeal for support for Cancer Research UK by doing a charity cycle ride. I feel let down by the lack of knowledge about this illness by our GP!S. Hoping for a reply to my email address to perhaps form some sort of support and springboard in this line of attack. The following is a little from my “About me” page About 14 years ago my wife Kathleen had breast cancer and got over that all right, but unfortunately she died

    earlier this year with an ovarian cancer that came upon her like a thief in the night and took her life on 21st

    February 2006. She had been a little below par for sometime at first it seemed to start with a stubborn heavy

    cold that then left her with what appeared to be like catarrh symptoms that would just not clear up. She

    visited the doctors on and off for something to clear the catarrh, nothing seemed to work and clear it. There

    were other slight changes that had happened at different stages she complained of backache for awhile, her

    likes and dislikes in food were changing . Some types of salad such as cucumber would upset her stomach,

    and there was a loss in energy levels. At some point she began to have stomach discomfort as well, this is

    when our GP started to give her pills to treat what he assumed to be stomach ulcers. Needless to say these

    also did not make any improvement in her condition. The GP then told us that because Kathleen had had

    cancer of the breast several years earlier he thought she should have some chest scans and arranged to have

    them carried out. These tests however did not show anything and on the same day as the tests they told us

    both that they were OK and gave her the all clear. Well this news seemed to cheer us both up at the time

    and gave great relief. Unfortunately her discomfort gradually worsened and a little further down the line

    back to the Doctor we went, Kathleen had now completed the course of tablets for stomach ulcers so he told

    Kathleen she could safely increase the dosage. I then told the Doctor that as she was having difficulty

    eating or drinking and that anything she took would be brought back. (At this point Kathleen’s condition

    was deteriorating quite quickly) the Doctor then said he would arrange to have an endoscopy carried out,

    that this test would find out the problem but meanwhile to double up on the prescribed tablets, even

    though I had told him anything she had tried to swallow would be brought back. How we managed to

    survive those days leading up to the Hospital appointment I don’t know for Kathleen could not eat or

    drink without bringing it back. On the day of the Hospital appointment Kathleen had to be taken in a

    wheelchair to the clinic ward she was so weak. Needless to say Kathleen was admitted on that very same

    day to investigate her illness. This was at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary there were many tests carried

    out and eventually one of the tests had shown a shadow on her left ovary. Because this now came under the

    care of the Derby City Hospital Kathleen was transferred there, where after many more tests and

    approximately 5 weeks later Kathleen lost her battle with what was a very aggressive type of cancer. Those

    were the worst 5 weeks for myself and our two sons to be there with Kathleen not being able to do anything

    to halt her sad deterioration that was taking place day by day. We were there with Kathleen every day in the

    latter weeks for they put her in a side ward by herself and very kindly put another bed in there so that one

    of us could stay there at night, we alternated my sons and myself, so for almost every second of the day one

    of us was there with her to bring any of her needs to the nurses attention. My own personal belief is that

    our GP has failed Kathleen by not reading and heeding those earlier warning signs, he has missed the

    chance to initiate the appropriate actions for tests that would have identified her illness sooner,

    perhaps then, there may have been more time to undergo surgery that could have extended her life. When

    the hospital Surgeon had told the family that he thought this to be a cancer my oldest son then used the

    internet where it lists many of the early warning symptoms about this illness and he probably now knows

    more on the subject than our GP. I honestly believe that if GP’s were not in such an hurry with their 10

    minute visiting times and paid more attention during their patients visits, were armed with the updated

    knowledge and latest developments in the detection of Cancers then it could I am sure save some lives that

    are otherwise lost through ignorance because those symptoms have been detected too late. Sadly this was

    the case for my late wife Kathleen, an opportunity missed, surely the doctors should be aware, have to

    be aware and be on the lookout for any subtle changes that occur and be ready to act accordingly.

    Apparently we in Britain have the worst detection rate

    in Europe.

    Please click on the link below for supportive information regarding this statement
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1655991.stm

  • maria
    28 July 2010

    Hi,I like the advet it’s great and make people think,unfortunately that is the life. I lost some people close to my heart,one of them was only 4 and I know loads people who had treatment and they are fine now. As well I had scae myself when i had to wait weeks for results.
    Next time something about awareness how to self check would be great.

  • Elizabeth
    26 July 2010

    Hello, I’m mid way through treatment for primary breast cancer, having recently had chemo and surgery, and awaiting radio. I think this is likely to be an effective ad, and I have worked in public sector advertising for many years so I have a sound enough understanding of how these things work. People will be affected differently by the harsh truth spoken in the ad – that our condition can recur and can be fatal. I can appreciate why some are upset but I hope people who feel this way come in time to focus on how much clinical outcomes have improved owing to the work of CRUK. My aunt died quite quickly in the 1970s with what I have. As things stand, my outlook is good and may get even better over time if effective communications help to raise funds to improve the cutting edge work backed by CRUK.

  • Vivien Pomfrey MSc
    26 July 2010

    I am absolutely in favour of medical research and attempts to raise funds for this. However, I wonder whether your donors are aware of the extent to which your organisation wastes money funding pointless research using crude animal ‘models’ of human cancers, which can never accurately mimic human cancer either in its development or its form, or the complex physiology of the human species in which the cancers grow and with which they interact. I am sure that progress would be a great deal faster, and lethal side-effects of drugs greatly reduced, if you followed the lead of more enlightened charities like the Dr Hadwen Trust, Lord Dowding Fund and Humane Research Trust and only funded non-animal, human-relevant research.

  • Heather McNiven
    26 July 2010

    I’m assuming that the previous comment came from someone who has never suffered from cancer himself or known a cancer patient. (Either that or he’s totally self-obsessed). I also assume that he hasn’t bothered to read any of the previous comments, because if he had, he’d know that Cancer Research UK receive no public funding for their work and desperately need public support. What do CRUK do, actually? Well here’s a clue: CANCER RESEARCH – without which we’d have no hope at all. If I’m wrong, and he has received treatment for cancer himself, let me ask one thing: how does he think the treatment he received was developed?

  • Carl
    26 July 2010

    Why can you not stop asking for money and start offering help. This advert just guilts people into sending money with no clear explanation of what you offer cancer sufferers. Actually what is it you do, do? I mean really?

  • Axolotl
    24 July 2010

    The expression on the face of the woman at the end of the ad haunts me… desperately sad.

  • sandi
    24 July 2010

    hi,I personally am getting over cervical cancer .I was diagnosed last october (2009) and I find the advert towards the end a bit unfeeling or uncaring .I am still feeling shell shocked and confused over my treatments and very emotional so dont actually enjoy watching this advert

  • ali
    23 July 2010

    This has been extremely upsetting for my family which is trying to deal with the traumas of cancer in a dearly loved relation right now; it is especially upsetting for the children too. I don’t think the flicking about from person to person works particularly well because you really have to concentrate to pick up what’s going on. Most of all, I don’t think it will have any effect on people who have not been exposed to the awfulness of the disease; for the rest of us, who already support the cause, well… some people might be wondering why our donations are being spent on an ad campaign which – at the end – emotionally punches those already affected where it hurts, and will most likely wash over the rest of the population. A rethink definitely needed please.

  • Pamela Harris
    23 July 2010

    Having been personally touched by a close member of my family diagnosed with bowel cancer and following the operation and chemo we are all very positive. I do feel that whilst your advert is very good in highlighting the wonderful work and how very important reserch is into cancer and would want everyone to be touched by it to give a donation, my heart sinks at the end when it is mentioned “it has returned”. I know that there is a possibility that for some people this may happen. But this to me must frighten and cause people like my daughter to go into a complete panick at a time when her young husband of 29 and only being married for 18 months is being so positive for the future. There have been months of being on an emotional roller coaster and now that chemo has just finished these young people look forward to the future.
    As a mother I want to keep my darlings positive.

  • Julie
    23 July 2010

    Some people have criticised the ad for being too negative (“It’s come back”) – but think what would have happened if the ad had simply gone on about how progress was being made, how more people can survive cancer now, etc etc….then it would have been criticised for being overly positive and ignoring those patients who are not going to survive!

    Personally, I simply cannot see any point in wasting money on an advert that only says how much better things are now for cancer patients! Yes, some people are surviving cancer, or at least living a lot, lot longer than they once did. But far, far too many are not.

    And, believe me, if some people here are finding it distresing to be reminded that one day they may be told “it’s come back”, how about sparing a thought for those, like my husband, who had to hear, right at the moment of diagnosis, that it was already terminal. That there was NO chance for him at all!

    In this day and age, a late diagnosis of cancer is not just tragic – it’s a disgrace.

  • Louise Sandison
    22 July 2010

    Very good advert – straight and to the point. Made more of an impact because it was not done by actors. Certainly does not need music.

  • jenny sharp
    21 July 2010

    Love the fact that people with real life experience of cancer were prepared to take part to help others.
    Full of admiration.
    Roops you are just fab! we miss ya!

  • Anita-Jayne Oliver
    20 July 2010

    I saw it, it delivers hope about what we are all doing, I am doing the best I can with my race for life and sponsors, but its her face, at the end, I saw it on my mum’s face and you made me cry. I just want to hold everyone with that face and tell them it’s going to be alright, but it’s not is it. KEEP FIGHTING, please, there is a cure out there I know, we will find it just hold on til we do OKAY. I love you all living and sadly dead.

  • alex berry
    19 July 2010

    This advert is briliant i hope it catches peoples minds to cancer. i lost my nan to cancer 1 month ago and will be donating 2 pounds a month and doing every 10 k run i can to raise money im even thinking about doing a marathon im in i just hope everyone else is too

  • Brian Overend
    19 July 2010

    The proof of the pudding is in the eating and time will tell if this ad has been a success.I think that it is very good and gets the point across.For those who think that music would help then I say why not try it with music but I would suggest something like Fleetwood Macs Albatross would be something that would stick in the mind.

  • Tina
    19 July 2010

    As someone who had breast cancer 5 years ago I am well aware that “it can come back” but really don’t want myself of my family to be reminded while relaxing watching TV. I find it frustrating that in the UK we donate more money to cancer research per head than any other country in EU but so many of the new drugs are not available to us or we have a long fight or we are just told they are not cost effective………Before you are diagnosed you don’t realise this, you hear about breakthroughs and new drugs and think great but then after diagnosis you find out these drugs are not available to you on the NHS but your oncologist asks if you have private health care, you might get the drugs that way! and you wonder why you supported CR for all these years!
    Also I would like to know why I received this email in the first place?

  • Emma
    19 July 2010

    This ad really make you think, it is both positive and realistic covering both side of Cancer, I can speak from experince of having been in remisssion for the past 2 years I understand some of the negative comments with regards the closing statement however I am also aware that for us to move forward with a break through for Cancer we have to accpect all aspect of the diesase. I hope that people can draw on the positive that Cancer Research has accomplished over the many years.

  • Heather McNiven
    19 July 2010

    Surely, in the field of cancer research, money IS everything; no money = no research, no progress, no development of better drugs with less side effects, no improvement in survival rates, no cure eventually. I live everyday with the fact that my cancer could come back. I had lobular breast cancer, which could happen again in either breast totally unrelated to the cancer I had before, so that extra fear is always there on the back burner. I want that cure to be found!

  • Russell
    18 July 2010

    I like the advert, But I also think it could have done with some background music.

  • Mrs Ball
    18 July 2010

    I had to write about the recent advert on television, in my opion it is disgusting, it’s bad enough having cancer, without being told it can come back, we all know this and do not need to be reminded, in my opion it is cruel and thoughtless to say the least – it’s a bit like saying don’t think your safe just because you have had the all clear, I can’t even bear to write down the last sentence of the advert, because it is every ones greatest fear, I think it is disgusting, it’s bad enough that cancer is used as a threat to all society to police them to behave how the government wants us to with out doing this, I really object to this advert and I will stop sending my donations untill it stops, after all most of the reserch is done by students who pay to do it. I am really really upset and angry. And yes afraid, every day of my life for the rest of my life, thanks for reminding me.

  • Stibule
    18 July 2010

    I saw this advert on television before reading the e mail asking for comments. Both my husband and I found it very moving. Our 8 year old son died of leukaemia last year after initially responding very well to chemotherapy, so we, too, have heard both sides of the advert. Although it is upsetting to see on television that this horrible disease can come back after it seems that it has been beaten, that is the bitter truth of it. It certainly should not stop people from getting the most out of their life while they have it, but the advert hits home hard to people who have NOT been through this experience and that is exactly what it needs to do, to get them to donate and fund a cure. By the way, while our son was dying from his cancer which now has an 80% success rate, we met another family whose child had an extremely rare form of lung cancer, with no known survivors. A year on, she has recovered, her hair has grown back, she is at school and probably not many of her friends know that she had cancer – there is ALWAYS hope…

  • Roseann
    18 July 2010

    I am 2 years in remission from AML. The advert is awful especially the ‘it has come back’. I am a very positive person which helped me survive but I find this advert extremely upsetting, I cannot watch it.
    I cannot believe that the person who thought up this advert actually had cancer!

  • Alison
    18 July 2010

    Well it took me a while to summon up the courage to enter a comment on this site and then my post got lost in tranisiton. I understand that every charity is really struggling for funds at the moment but I believe there are ways and ways to go about seeking donations and I think your marketing people got this one wrong if only on the sensitivity front. I do not know anyone who is not afraid of cancer and so surely an ad which says what you are doing and what you would like to do and the fact that you have no other funding would say it all. To be honest it feels like a bit of a cynical ploy to play on the fears of those whose lives have already been touched directly by cancer with the “it’s come back” line. As someone who is working very hard to keep the fear of that down to manageable size and knowing that negative thoughts can have a negative impact on my health it is not helpful to have an ad shining a light on something I had managed to put away and I know I’m not the only one. We all know Macmillan deal with terminal care but their ads are kind and sensitive, this one seems to have an unkind and hard edge. Cancer is hard enough on its own without the marketing crew then adding to it.

  • Alison Scarborough
    18 July 2010

    I have finally plucked up the courage to make a comment about this advert. I think that someone in the marketing department has misunderstood the aim of the advert. I fully understand how hard it is for all charities to get funding in this current climate but to, what feels if I’m honest, cynically play on the fear of every person whose life has been touched by cancer either directly or indirectly with the “its come back” at the end of the ad in order to gain donations is surely the wrong way to go about things. This ad has a hard edge and feels unkind unlike the Macmillan ads that whilst dealing directly with peoples same fears come across as kind and sensitive. I do not know anyone who does not fear cancer. Talk about what you are doing, what you want to do to hit it and hit it hard but please oh please do not keep shining the light on the fear of recurrence that any of us who have had cancer have managed to tuck away in a corner so that we have to deal with it again and again. Negative thoughts are not good for our health. I may of course be the only one who struggles to keep these thoughts in check but I think it unlikely.

  • Nick Bedford
    18 July 2010

    I have lost both of my parents and a more distant family relation to cancer. I am a Cancer Reseach supporter, but I do not like the new advert for two reasons. Firstly, the advert concentrates too much on the negative “It’s come back” aspect. Secondly, the style is awful. When faced with any presentation, be it an advert or any other TV program, where the shot changes every couple of seconds, I simply switch off. The style is irritating and simply detracts from the message rather than enhancing it. You really need to do better than this if you wish to drum up more support for such a worthy cause!

  • Swotof
    17 July 2010

    I am disappointed with your tv ad which mentions cancer recurrence. It would seem this is a central marketing theme this year as there was also a lady talking live about her recurrence at the Race for Life event I ran this year.

    As a survivor of breast cancer myself (5 years in), recurrence is NOT something I want to hear about.

    I suspect you’re trying to raise funds by any means but this is not the way forward. If you want my continued support, I suggest you come up with a “Plan B”.

  • Deborah Atkinson
    17 July 2010

    Well done to the people who featured in the advert, a good advert to the point- you do not need music, this is real !!! and it effects families, we need to have the research without it more people will not survive; our daddy died of bowel cancer; however because of the research more people survive like my sister, both my sons and me. I will continue to give in ways I can like the ‘Race for Life’. People need to know the truth. Thank you

  • Linda Scott
    17 July 2010

    My daughter has just finished her chemo treatment and is due for radiotherapy, she has grade 3 aggressive cancer of the breast and young children. To be sitting in front of the T.V. and the advert comes on ,which is very positive until the last moments, then the words` it`s come back`. Well she was so upset she couldn`t sleep that night. Surely if 1 in 3 people are touched by cancer either directly or indirectly then this advert has no positive meaning unless the last part is removed. People are not stupid they know how things can turn out and they give generously all the time but for my daughters sake and others like her worried about the future please remove the saddening last part of your advert.

  • djb
    17 July 2010

    I thought it was good until the end, it is upsetting to me. If people cannot donate without being told that people die from cancer and that cancer can come back then they must be pretty isolated. I have only recently been told that my cancer has spread to my liver and have not told my family yet, I am waiting until I can give them more facts about my treatment and/or chance of survival, to sit there when the lovely woman appears at the end for me is heartbreaking. I have read the comment from her mother and my heart goes out to her as my sister died from a cancer three months from diagnosis so unfortunately I can see it from the patient’s and the relative’s viewpoint, but I think the further sadness caused to people with cancer cannot be justified by the fact that maybe someone will donate some money. Money is not everything.

  • Stella
    17 July 2010

    Simple, to the point- there was no confusing the message with unconvincing actors, distracting music or over-done visuals.

    Good luck with this campaign, hope it brings in all the help you deserve.

  • maxine
    17 July 2010

    The ad is ok BUT my mother died of cancer in November 07 and this will be my secound year for doing the cancer research run for life,And I’m really proud that Im trying to do my bit to help others is raising money. But I would really love to see some black people in your ad because they say you never no how it feels until it hit home and ever since my mother had passed away with cancer so many people I know now has either passed or suffering with this diease, so please we are out there to (black people) dieing and fighting for our life, so show that we are being recognise to.

  • Gillian
    17 July 2010

    I can appreciate the concept, but splitting whole sentences up between different people made it all distractingly bitty for me.
    (Sorry!)

  • sarah
    17 July 2010

    please add the relay in next time 2 show it is fun to raise money for charity so maybe they may wanner get involoved so that would be more money for this fab charity!x

  • sarah
    17 July 2010

    I think its is good because it shows u can get cancer and survive :) or can get cancer but dont survive:(.
    everyone keep researching and keep donating money to cancer research uk the fab charity!!

  • alan sieber
    17 July 2010

    I think the advert is powerful, simple and strikes the right balance between hope and reality.

  • Sue, Berkshire
    16 July 2010

    I entered a comment on the 12 July, little did I know I would loose my mother to cancer two days later 14th. I wanted to say, without research I wouldn’t have had my mum for the extra years I did. I would like to thank Dr Wassan and his team at hammersmith hospital, Ducane rd, for giving my Mum golden treasured times with me & my family which i believe is due to endless research to combat this terrible disease. My Mum always said at least trialing cancer treatment drugs, chemotherapy, will hopefully help others in the future like others have helped me. The advert for me, is to the point, powerful and if it stirs emotions to remind people we need to keep researching but need help surely that’s being open and honest. I still think that maybe it should consider the unsung hero’s , the carers, like my dad and others who have to watch their loved ones suffer. Having said that the advert made me stop in my tracks and cry before my mum died……and now…..an even more poineint message.

  • Deb
    16 July 2010

    Hi,
    I like the advert and I think it is a good awareness approach. I am 28yrs old currently undergoing treatment for inflammatory breast cancer and I wish I dont have it and also wish to be cured and never for it to come back.
    I think the advert is brilliant and wish I have been contributing before now.
    God bless all who participate and give them healthy life.
    Deb.

  • Penny
    16 July 2010

    Really good ad! Hits the spot. I hope it raises you lots of money.

  • Beverley
    16 July 2010

    Hi,

    I think the advert is fantastic, its touching and moving and makes it more realistic as doctors and actual patients are feautured, the advert is raw, it’s not been covered up or sweetened up, it hits home about how horrific cancer really is and how many people, young and old, male and female it affects. Really well done, i think it’s brilliant but i also agree that some music could have bee featured to add to the emotion, just like the john lewis ad x

  • Maggie
    16 July 2010

    I think the advert is excellent. The lack of musical soundtrack actually makes it more poignant and more striking.
    Keep up the good work, keep saving my freinds lives.

  • Ronnie
    15 July 2010

    I found the advert did what it needed to do, pull at the heartstrings, stir emotion and make me want to get behind Cancer Research. I know the wonderful, brave, funny and unique lady at the end of the Ad. Some have criticised on here that they found the ending upsetting , that it wasn’t giving other sufferes hope. Please look at the Ad again, the lady at the end is hope – she beat it first time round and Ann will do it again, she grabs life with both hands and says this wont beat me – I will beat it!

  • lauren
    15 July 2010

    i think it is sooooo sweet that little girl and i know 3 people who have died of cancer but to all you familys who have lost someone recently im sooo sorry

  • Joanne
    15 July 2010

    The message hits home which is surely the sole intention!

  • Chris Stevenson
    15 July 2010

    Direct and to the point, good with no music and using real people – maybe more emphasis in the text to highlight that it can happen to anyone at anytime, the man or woman in the street, any of your friends,family, YOU !

  • Rachel
    15 July 2010

    I think the advert is short and to the point and music is not needed in this case, where as when it is the 5k race for life, thats when the music is involved!
    For years you have created wonderful adverts!
    The only thing that I believe is missing is the majority not knowing that these are people affected or work for cancer research, in previous adverts you wrote beside each person when they were diagnosed and such – I think that was a good technique to involve .. therefore its clear these are real people.. and for people who ork there.. say they joined so many years ago etc! ..
    Mybe people do not agree..
    I understand that people who have lost aloved one to cancer may not want to see such adverts! so you want the warning at the beginning however, you should watch it and be reminded of good times and be inspired that together we wil find a cure!
    Hopefully more people will watch this donate!..
    What is more important than a persons life? ..

  • janice milne
    15 July 2010

    This advert is very good and to the point and putting real people in who have had cancer is good and I don’t think it needs music but they could show more of what they behind the scenes. My Nan and Aunty died of Breast cancer years ago and didn’t have the chances they have today because not enough research had been done. With research my Mom and an Aunty got the all clear after having Breast cancer and because of Breast cancer running in the family they did tests and found out my brother and myself have 80% chance of getting breast cancer so with more research more can be done for cancer sufferers but they need money to do that and people did to be told so they can give money I give £22.00 a month so more can be gone.

  • Monica and Anthony
    15 July 2010

    A word to those who are complaining that the advert upsets them. We are the parents of Ann, the last lady to appear, and naturally it upsets us too. It is heartbreaking for us to see our beloved daughter having to go through so much pain and distress during her treatment and even worse to see her on television in such circumstances. But the idea of the advert is to help provide a future for her and her husband and three children and to prevent others having to suffer in the same way. She is a very brave young lady and we are all so proud of her.

  • Keith
    15 July 2010

    The message is very moving but, on a technical level, some of the editing between comments isn’t quite sharp enough, giving a slightly disjointed feel. It also took me three viewings to realise that the final comment was, ‘It’s come back.’ (I do realise how trivial this must sound to some people, but it is a minor criticism of a generally effective film.)

  • Angela
    14 July 2010

    I liked the advert and found it very touching because real people were used. The advert did make me sit and think. Having lost my husband 15 years ago at such a young age, and having our 18 month old daughter to care for. The advert made me aware that this terrible disease is still around. I have since lost other family members and friends to cancer. Cancer research will always remain close to me.

  • Rita Sharma
    14 July 2010

    It is made by real people who deal with this everyday, yes thumbs up for this effort.

  • Cheryl
    14 July 2010

    I think this advert is good in the fact that it uses real people but it isn’t made obvious… it should probably be worked somewhere into the advert that these are NOT actors and are all people who have suffered and/or work to cure Cancer, as it may then be a bit more of an eye opener for people who have never had the experience or heart ache of what Cancer can do to a person/family.

  • Nicola Symeonides
    14 July 2010

    This is a great advert. Very touching. I have known 3 very close members in my family who have died of cancer so this reminds me that I should help those so that they do not have the same fate. Keep up the good work.

  • Allison Morley
    14 July 2010

    Hi the advert was really good ,my brother died of leukemia which was hard when i was younger,so i can relate with the advert . My daughter has recently recorded a song for the Sara hope foundation to raise money for terminally ill children called gone to soon ,cancer research will always be close to my heart .

  • Emma
    14 July 2010

    This advert was very moving, i sat afterwards in complete silence at how much it hit home and how much this disease changes people’s lives. My Grandad is fighting Cancer and it was upsetting to see the advert but makes everyone know that we have to donate and support this charity to be able to cure everybody one day.
    Truly direct and powerful advert.

  • Jenny Riley
    14 July 2010

    I think the advert is brill, really brings home what both doctors and patients go through.

    3 months ago i lost my grandmother to cancer, she recieved fantastic care, cary on the good work.

  • Henry Scowcroft
    14 July 2010

    Ruth – Thanks for your comment and sorry for the fact that there wasn’t a transcript or captions available when you visited the site. The transcripts of the filmed interviews with the participants in our new campaign are now live on the site and can be found on our About Us website. There’s also a transcript of the above video here:

    http://aboutus.cancerresearchuk.org/what-we-do/our-new-tv-campaign/tv-campaign-transcript/

    Apologies once again for the delay. Due to the number of films we have produced it took longer than planned to produce the transcripts. At Cancer Research UK we do take accessibility extremely seriously. Thank you for your comments.

  • Lynn Saunders
    14 July 2010

    Very moving and to the point. The variety of patients give an important message that this affects us all. The doctor’s speaking show the compassion required to work with families going through this experience and is powerful in making the viewer want to participate in helping. This after all is the point of the ad.

  • Ric Coggins
    14 July 2010

    I work in the marketing industry, in PR in fact so recognise why this ad has been created and the process it has gone through in order to be made. However, having been diagnosed with cancer and trying to remain positive about the whole thing, I found the ad to be upsetting and actually insensitive. There are ways in which to get across impactful messages around fundraising without the upset it may cause along the way. I believe I am a strong person and I know if I feel this way about it, there will be many others who feel similar and in some cases may actually send them overvthe edge. From experience it is the people who approve of something that shout the loudest so while there may be a lot of positive comments left, I don’t believe it to be a true reflection of public view. I know it’s all about personal interpretation but it gets a massive thumbs down from me, simply because of the ending, up until then I felt inspired.
    Ric

  • Lorna
    14 July 2010

    Really great advert. No comment the advert says it all.

    Well done.

  • Louis Radford
    14 July 2010

    The lady at the end, for whom cancer has returned, should have been shown for a few more seconds. The first time that I watched the advertisement, I did not even notice her, as she was on for too short a time. I wonder how many viewers will not notice her and thus miss the key message?

  • adele
    13 July 2010

    An excellent advert.No music necessary in my opinion. Would dearly love to have more publicity given to men’s prostate cancer…symptoms; causes; treatments.Prostate cancer affects women too you know…whether it’s wives,mothers, sisters

  • Damaris
    13 July 2010

    Don’t add music as it a good, punchy ad, but agree with ‘warning’ logo. I am in remission but my partner is undergoing treatment for an aggresive cancer. Some people can discuss it, others can’t for many reasons. My parents can’t and get upset at even the mention of cancer; why force them to when they are obviously not ready?

  • Janet garner
    13 July 2010

    I thought the ad was very hard hitting but showed compassion and if I didn’t already contribute it would have encouraged me to do so. I thought the way it showed the doctors’ perspective as well as the patients’ was cleverly done.

  • Sam
    13 July 2010

    Adverts are necessary to add people to the donors list (I am on it for a lot more than £2 a month) but I do find it distressing as I have known many people die of cancer including some quite young.(Don’t think I know any survivors) How many people might you lose from the donors list becuase you don’t seem to care about them?

  • Heather McNiven
    13 July 2010

    I don’t think this new ad is emotional blackmail at all. It’s not aimed at educating us about cancer, we can find that information on the internet if we want it. It’s about telling people what life is like FOR CANCER PATIENTS. I lost my much-loved grandmother TO CANCER 7 years ago, and a very dear friend last year, so I know what that’s like. But I also had breast cancer myself 3 years ago, and believe me, there’s a world of difference between watching it and having it! You might think you know all about cancer, but having it gives you a whole new perspective. I’ve never felt so lonely and afraid. CRUK ads tell it like it really is! THE THING IS, one day there will be a cure, they may even be able to prevent it. But that won’t happen without our financial support, and the more support is given the sooner it will happen. Ads like this are raw, they strike a nerve, and it hurts. But if ads like this are what it takes – BRING IT ON!!!!!

  • lynne
    13 July 2010

    good and to the point, ordinary people. maybe a warning before so as not to upset anyone

  • Julie
    13 July 2010

    The ad, like all the CRUK ads, are powerful and emotional. But my criticism is that, like nearly everything in the media, it simply does not spell out the tough facts of cancer – which are: Find it early and live, find it too late and die. Huge amounts of money are put into trying to find a cure for metastatic cancer, rather than developing and rolling out lifelong, effective, accurate, cheap, safe screening for ALL cancers. If we can diagnose cancer before it metastasises, or before those lethal-at-primary (like brain tumours) cancers reach lethal size, then existing treatments will work. We shouldn’t NEED to find cures for metastatic cancer…..

  • Andrew Bundy
    13 July 2010

    I monday 12 July 2010 I was told that if i do not move to donate money to cancer research, the dreadful disease will come back to haunt it’s unfortunate victims.

    Emotional blackmail has hit a new low with your recent campaign

    It is not the first time that cancer research has used this tactic and sadly wont be the last

    I and everyone else worth there opinion know about the effects of cancer and do not need reminding or having traumatic experiences shoved down our throats

    I lost my mother through cancer, I know its effect on life. Why dont you tell us where the money is being spent and how you are developing as an aid to this disease? Instead of telling us in this sick way what we already know, how dreadful cancer is.

    I will no longer donate to cancer research, i find you methods of campaigning upsetting twisted and unethical.

  • Andy Hughes
    13 July 2010

    I think the most important thing about an advert like this is to get the message across to people. Sometimes this has to be shocking enough to grab someone’s attention and I don’t think that music is the answer, as in many other views previously. In my view (a music lover may I add) it recreates the moment of shock when a person is told that they have have Cancer for the first time and the same emotion when that person then informs their loved ones. It’s at that point that their whole world freezes and any sounds surrounding them are muted. If I would critisise any part of the advert, I would say that I wasn’t 100% convinced of the acting and I felt as though the people involved had a kind of ‘reading from a card’ feel to them. I’m convinced that these people are indeed surgeons/sufferers, etc but for me, I didn’t get enough emotion coming through. Music would over dramatise the advert and you hear music all the time in adverts so I applaud the writers/producers for that. Unlike the piont of view from Stephanie Shepherd above, I don’t think this requires a happy ending – it defeats the object and subsequently gives the impression that we’ve won this battle when in fact we haven’t.

  • Stephanie Shepherd
    13 July 2010

    Seems about the right length- concise. Although it needs music and it soudns too ‘bitty’ between the takes of different people- shoudl flow more. I know you want to convey the seriousness of cancer, but why not juxtapose teh visual shock (like the woman who ahd lost her hair due to chemo) with a great big smile and her family around her becuase she’s recieved the all clear? The ending needs more work I think…you know a scene with that woman and her husband kids around her witha a smile or something? Just a thought….

  • Romaine Marie T
    13 July 2010

    The advert for campaign on cancer research is very natural, informative and realistic. This campaign shows the serious committment of Scientists, Doctors and others workers for cancer patients. It is a great source of hope and encouragement for cancer patients who can understand that they are not left behind. Efforts are made to find curative treatments or way to extend the life for cancer’s patients. This will encourage the public to donate and or participate to cancer research in order to save life. Well done

  • Lucienne
    13 July 2010

    This ad stopped me in my tracks, was impactful, emotional and really thought provoking – brilliant. As someone who works in advertising I’m always reviewing ads, their impact and trying to asses the brief & objectives behind them. It’s such a strong approach – I hope you win an award.

  • emily
    13 July 2010

    I absolutely agree witht he woman who notes that it is really difficult for people living with cancer to be subjected to these adverts without warning or time to prepare. I have been treated for breast cancer and have been told I’m never going to get an ‘it’s gone’ now. The only way I can survive each day and look after my baby is to try to forget what is happening to me. TV adverts are a constant reminder and come as a surprise every time they are shown. I know you do vital work but please try and consider all of the impacts of cancer, the emotional as well as the medical. I may not have many days left and your adverts make each one I do have harder.

  • Chris Webb
    13 July 2010

    I agree with Annette. It is excellent and “saying it like it is” is the best way to be realistic. There is always hope for every life and if the brilliant people who can give us hope are given the resources to help find complete cures – what a glorious defeat that would be for all sufferers. No need for music, it says it all.

  • Minali Liyanage
    13 July 2010

    Short and straight to the point. Feels very real with the use of “real” people actors. I like that it has no music. I think adding music could make the advert cheesy and distract the point and emotion of the clip. Great touch at the end with the silence. Well done and good luck!

  • Heather Robinson
    13 July 2010

    I did comment earlier, but I wanted to just add my support to Paul Sandeman’s comments. My daughter is in the advert along with his wife and i think that ending with this brave lady’s silence is realistic but she seems positive to me! I have lived the last 5 years wondering if i will see my daughter grow up or if i will lose her, it just means you enjoy everything more and you treasure experiences, family and friends more. I realise that so far we are very lucky to be freed from this disease, being depressed and angry gets nowhere. If this advert offends or upsets you then please turn off the television in your lovely ideal world. This is real life and if you cannot bear to watch a group of skilled Doctors and brave survivors talk for 40 seconds to raise money to stop other people going through what they have gone through, then I am sorry for you. I suspect people who watch a cancer storyline on the soaps don’t complain when watching it for 30 minutes??
    I am immensely proud of all the survivors involved in this campaign.

  • fojaax
    13 July 2010

    well,i chope is going on.let me say about what i think.i think its nice for what uk researh are doing.i wish thay can form an hospital special for canser patients having a task force to observe patients on whats changeging to them with having the treament,observe the timing,work with astrologers studies and apply them .and get together,all the md,s,geniuses and even include me and i can gurantee we will find a cure.thank you.

  • Alex Kaye
    13 July 2010

    Regarding my first post on 11th July at 12:19pm;

    I meant that any workers in the UK would ASK their employers to deduct the pound.

    PS. The video was OK but let people know; but for the grace of GOD this could be them?

  • Ruth Randell
    12 July 2010

    I had a quick look at the preview about cancer but i cannot understand any of the people talking because i am deaf. it has to be captioned or subtitled. Please put the subtitles on for deaf people, hard of hearing deafened and hearing loss people.
    I don’t want them to be excluded because some of them have cancer or died of cancer too.

  • Annette Riddle
    12 July 2010

    Excellent. Don’t change a thing. Giving information which is a mixture of informative and hard to hear. Saying it like it is but also being positive. No music needed. Advertising at its best.

  • Jozie Coleman
    12 July 2010

    I have just been told my cancer is back so this will be my 30th operation but I live in hope everyday….This advert is FABULOS as it’s us (real people)it does NOT NEED MUZIK as it does the job it’s supposed 2….my arms had so many goosebumps when i watched it….I then signed up for £2.00 a month…
    GOD BLESS US ALL……xxx

  • Paul Sandeman
    12 July 2010

    The whole point of the advert titled “giving news” is about the people who treat and are being treated for the disease. If for some that is uncomfortable to watch then tough! Unfortunately we cannot live our lives with jolly soundracks and just focus on the bright rainbows! The lady at the end is my wife and we are living with hope, positive outlooks and complete confidence in the people at CRUK. Just because it might be bad news does not give you an excuse for submission. We do and will all fight to beat this horrid disease.

  • Margaret Nelson
    12 July 2010

    Seems fine to me.

  • Stephen Taylor
    12 July 2010

    The advert distressed my wife. She wonders if its producers consider its impact on cancer patients. She is nearing the end of treatment, with a good response, but fears the ending of the advert will be her fate. You would not raise funds to feed starving African children by showing them ads in which some are fed and others perish!

  • karen platt
    12 July 2010

    Having lost family members and my best friend to cancer and having nursed my husband with oesophageal and stomach cancer only a year ago, who is now in remission.
    I personally didnt get the shock factor to make me donate to cancer research. what in fact did make me donate to cancer research was my first visit to the christie hospital.
    I have never felt anything as powerful and overwhelming as seeing such a vast number of all ages right accross the spectrum all who have got or had cancer litterally battling for their life. That is a stark shock.The look of hope and desperation on so many faces.Maybe more emphasis on the people that are`nt going to make it or sadly didnt make it may spur people on to donate.I discussed this advert with my husband as said at the beginning who is himself a cancer patient. I think more people will donate on the basis of people who dont survive than the ones who do,when people think a cure is in sight they think that money is plentiful and not needed.
    I dont think the advert was powerful enough to reach out to the people who are lucky enough to have not been touched by caner

  • Tina Clarke
    12 July 2010

    I felt the advert was very poignant…dont add music! The people and their emotions they protray say it all. The ending is sad and I understand why it was put where it was. I keep focusing on how she looked and what it means to her…instead of how far research and success has come today!!

  • louise weatherhead
    12 July 2010

    very good and close to my heart as on July 10th last year I was told I had ovarian cancer. I have had two lots of surgery 7 cycles of chemotherapy and now in remission and have so much to be thankful for. I was so scared and thought I was going to die. i have done the race for life five times never thinking I would be the one receiving vital treatment. it just goes to show you never know what is round the corner.

  • Margaret Marshall
    12 July 2010

    I loved the advert, just the right amount of emotion, having survived breast cancer and chemotherapy myself I felt it gave a really positive message across which is so important. Keep donating.

  • Sam O'Nians
    12 July 2010

    I think the ad is very good, knowing that these are not actors enhances the poignancy of the message. I did find some of the drs lines too ‘chopped up’ though (they had only 3 words sometimes) and this detracted from the message for me. I have had cancer, my dear dad is currently suffering from cancer, the ad works, there is pain and there is hope. The ad needs to be aired a number of times, because each time you view it you see more emotion (particularly in the drs). Well done cancer research uk, you are amazing

  • jackie from bermondsey
    12 July 2010

    Just seen the advert on the big screen,the view is straight to the point,Im sure this will touch everybodys
    hearts keep up the good work cancer reasearch have done now and in the past.together we can all make a difference helping to raise enough money to improve and one day find a cure to this evil and deadly desease !!!
    ( Together we can beat cancer)

  • Ishfaq Mirza
    12 July 2010

    Good advert, hopefully more people will understand the impact cancer can have on sufferers and their families. People donate to the research it can happen to you god forbid.

  • Carolan Davidge
    12 July 2010

    Thanks so much to everyone who’s posted comments here and on our Facebook page – we really appreciate it. You’ve definitely given us lots to think about, and we’ll be looking through everything posted here to help us make future advertising campaigns even better.

    We’re sorry for anyone who was upset after viewing the advert. We do try to be as sensitive as we can in our advertising, whilst making sure our campaigns get their point across.

    To address a few recurring themes and specific points:

    There’s so much we’d have loved to include in the ad – for example, our work on highlighting prevention and early detection, the impact and achievements of our scientists over the years, a discussion of the (more than 200) different types of cancer our scientists are working on and their work on understanding how diet and lifestyle affect cancer risk. But as I’m sure you’ll all appreciate, advertising is at its most powerful when it’s most focused – trying to fit any more into the 30-40 second slots available would have diluted the campaign’s message and impact.

    That said, we’ve now published more information, including the stories of the people featured, on our website. There’s also a longer, more detailed series of videos on our new homepage.

    To address the point made about prostate cancer – one of the men featured in our campaign is prostate cancer survivor Nigel Foskett, and one of the doctors featured is our pioneering prostate cancer specialist Professor David Neal. And regarding David Grant’s comment about brain cancers – we’re also funding plenty of research in this area – have a look at this blog post about our latest brain cancer research.

    Erica – regarding your comments on donating to research that doesn’t involve animals. There are several ways you can do this, please contact our Supporter Services if you’d like to know more, their details are on our website.

    Finally, we’d just like to say a huge thank you to all of you who have helped support us. We couldn’t do what we do without you.

    Many thanks again,

    Carolan

    Carolan Davidge is Cancer Research UK’s Director of Brand and PR

  • Rosemary Griffiths
    12 July 2010

    Direct and to the point, I think music would detract the impact of the message.

  • Nikki Harvey
    12 July 2010

    The ad is succinct, says what it needs to on different levels and isn’t cloying or saccharine. No music please, it would turn it into the wrong ad.

  • Adele Houghton
    12 July 2010

    I think that the advert is very effective. The fact that you are showing more cases where the cancer has been beaten or kept under control in comparison with the one case where the news are not positive, is quite good.
    It shows that with research we can reduce the risk of death and it reinforces the appeal for donation in support of the research.

  • Julie Furber
    12 July 2010

    It’s real.. and as unfortunately Cancer touches all our lives at some point ..it makes you sit up and listen and I believe it’ll work and people will donate.

  • Lorna Denny
    12 July 2010

    This advert is simple, but direct and hard hitting. I have had several family members who have suffered and who we have lost to cancer. I am checked routinely for any signs, but I think people are very complacent if they have never been affected. It is all the more poignant that the people are not actors and the emotion can be seen and felt on their faces. I hope that people will listen, watch,and help in anyway that they can.

  • Rob Banner
    12 July 2010

    I think anything that promotes the treatment of cancer such as your advert is excellent. What really disappoints me is that no mention whatsoever is mentioned of Prostate Cancer, perhaps this is because it in peoples minds it affects older men although I know somebody of 38 who has just had an operation for his Prostate Cancer! And perhaps it is because the rate of this cancer is increasing year on year. It is the biggest cancer affecting men yet there is no National awareness campaign, 70% of men don’t know where their Prostate is an what it does! So we should remember that every 52 minutes one man dies of this disease, thats like a Jumbo Jet crashing every week. Yet no one even talks about it, perhaps if you have had it and survived you might think a little differently!

  • Vivienne Appanah
    12 July 2010

    A very good to the point advert,. I can relate to the message both professionally as a nurse practitioner and a victim of breast cancer having recently had surgery and a course of radiotherapy, my prognosis is very good. So much has improved with cancer care as my mum unfortunately died from breast cancer 16years ago, not being offered as many options of care as i received

  • Evaun
    12 July 2010

    As a breast cancer survivor of 5 years I do not need to be reminded that cancer can come back.Why did you have to finish on such a negative thought.I will be turning over every time I see this advert.

  • Susie Jay
    12 July 2010

    There are NO actors in this advert as my friend Claire is one of the people in it.. This is an excellent and VERY moving advert.

  • Isabella Pallant
    12 July 2010

    I dont think that we need music for this advert.
    I feel that it is straight to the point;..particulary when the patient is told her cancer has come back;..brought tears to my eyes;..it has also made me more awair that there is always that possibility;that it could return;and that we need lots of donations and help to beat this disease.

  • Fiona
    12 July 2010

    It’s a hard hitting advert and does get the point across but may be better with fewer doctors saying more of the sentence each. The most powerful bit for me was the lady at the end who had to face the fact it had come back.

  • Phil Adams
    12 July 2010

    Alas, one of the older ideas in advertising resurfaces; but moving, because the script doesn’t suggest a happy ending and beautifully produced.

  • Chelsea
    12 July 2010

    This is just right as it it is, very hard hitting, to the point and really gets you thinking.

  • Betty Millington
    12 July 2010

    Excellent, does not need anything else, gets the message over.
    Betty

  • Suzy Mitchell-Milheiras
    12 July 2010

    Because of the fact that I know you do great work and the intentions behind this advert would have been heartfelt I really wanted to like this advert more, I’m not sure whats missing but whilst I understand peoples comments regarding music somehow diminishing the effect by softening the message, aren’t Cancer research trying to reach people who to date have chosen not to donate? Everyone of us who have commented has already been affected directly or indirectly, this advert is not aimed at us. Whether we like it or not ‘puppies and kittens’ work because the public see’s hope and optimism in helping save these ‘defenceless’ creatures, music can tap into this same emotion, so I believe would ending the advert optimisticly, human nature will turn from negativity and ultimately the advert is about raising money. Having run the Race for life for the last five years the overwhelming feeling at theses events is of optimism and feeling that even when you feel powerless that there is still something you can do, if you could capture that in these adverts everyone would donate…that said I hope the advert works in every respect…x

  • Karen Timson
    12 July 2010

    Very powerful, very real, very true!
    As someone who has works within the NHS and has also survived Breast Cancer, I know what it feels like to give and to receive this news and this advert depicts this extremely well!
    Well done CRUK, You have my full support always.
    Karen

  • Dean Burrowes
    12 July 2010

    This advert gets straight to the point, my father is still suffering and my uncle is also suffering quite bad, everyone just needs to donate, this is such a good cause and hopefully in 10 0r 20 years time we might have found a drug or way of reducing this killer, i pray and hope there will be a cure because so many people are suffering. So come on lets tell friends/family to donate just £2 or £5 its really not alot a month.

  • Katie Lote
    12 July 2010

    I think the advert puts across the message how important it is to donate to such a worthy charity. i dont think it needs music as the viewer may focus on this more than the actual words of the people in the advert. my grandma died from pancreatic cancer just over 1 year ago and to watch someone you love suffer so much from such an awful disease is the worst feeling. i think this advert will make people sit up and watch and realise that donations are needed so much to help people in the future. as comments state above about mentioning types of cancer, i dont think this needs to be done as there are over 200 types of cancer – cancer is horrible in any shape or form and i think the advert shows this clearly and that we just need to focus on supporting the charity as a whole.

  • sylvia haslam
    12 July 2010

    I quite liked your advert, but do not think that it is hard hitting enough, it has not got enough oomph. I also lost my first husband to pancreatic cancer at the age of 46yrs old 15yrs ago. Saying that though i think that that a lot of cancer research has come along way in the past fifteen years, & it is not always a death sentence now as it used to be, so keep up the good work. sylvia haslam.

  • Ann
    12 July 2010

    A ‘real appeal from real people’. I think it works. Cancer is a battle that some win, some loose and some live with for many years. Donating is something most people can do to help with cancer research.
    My brother was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer four years ago and still lives an active life, so try to stay positive!

  • elizabeth
    12 July 2010

    sorry for the spelling mistakes I did mean to write as a breast cancer patient,

  • elizabeth
    12 July 2010

    As a breadt cancer patinet and going through treatment at present and doing really well, I think the advert is amazing, it highlights the emotions of cancer, having real people always in my opinion has a profound effect on any persons watching and will in some way make you stand back and think – THAT COULD BE ME

  • anita
    12 July 2010

    i think the new advert is good and shows examples of both sides of the emotions of cancer sufferers,and i prefer real life people to actors its more genuine . my mum died 2003 from cancer. i also noticed the advert doesnt highlight the other types of cancer which was sad as its important to be made aware of these also. i know people who died from lymph node cancer,and cancer of the oesaphagous. mayby they should include a short clip of a close relative of a sufferer too as it shows the effect on them also.

  • Cherryl
    12 July 2010

    I think that the advert is great and to the point but I will just add that until I was diagnosed with cancer I was still not 100% certain that Cancer Research gets NO FUNDING other than by donations. Perhaps that message could be made clearer. It is important.

  • Paul Taylor
    12 July 2010

    Yes the adverts ok, however it talks about cancers such as testicular and breast cancer where u can examine yourself and have a chance of catching it early—why no adverts about for example oesaphagous cancer where when u have symptoms its ususally to late to prevent spread to lymph nodes etc, and whereby the usual cause is drinking and smoking which increases the chance 100 times + if people had such info at least they then have the choice to modify there lifestyle—but there is nothing about such cancer ever brought to the publics attention until it is too late

  • Susan A
    12 July 2010

    I think its fantastic to hear good news about survival rates of cancer, particularly as I have friends who are currently undergoing treatment and they are really scared. This is a really positive message and great to see that donations are making a difference.

    However, I do feel that the conclusion of your ad is really disheartening for those who need to cling on to every bit of hope…I appreciate that it needs to be compelling in order to incentivize donations, however I think that it conveys mixed messages to those who are actually experiencing cancer.

  • Cate
    12 July 2010

    I thought it was powerful. Definitely doesn’t need music. I do think people are more likely to donate if they feel there is hope – that their donations will be of positive practical benefit and not just a gesture of support. I lost both my parents, my best friend (aged 27) and my nan to cancer. Several other family members and friends too. There have been some survivors and I know tht 30 years ago they probaby would have died so I can see what progress cancer research is making. There is a long long way to go andI hope this ad makes people give money for positive hopeful reasons, not just through fear. I must say it did leave me feeling very down but my losses have been recent and my sister-in-law is battling an incurable brain tumor so bleak emotions quite near the surface. So little is known about a lot of cancers but I do have hope that the lessons being learnt every day will make this horrendous disease one that is people will live with, not die from. Overall I think it gets its message across well.

  • sharon jones
    12 July 2010

    I felt the advert to be profound and deeply moving. As someone `surviving` multiple myeloma,any attention that can be brought to this wicked parasite;as I personally see it,is essential. No-one can imitate someone who has been diagnosed as terminally ill, as the ladys face clearly shows. Quietly sobbing was my outlet when I was told I was terminally ill, and still now 4 years down the line and still surviving, I sob to myself and ask why me?

  • D Williams
    12 July 2010

    Simple and straight to the point. As a survivor of Kidney cancer, I endured the horror of being told. No music, no laughing, just raw fact. The advert reflects this brilliantly. The good news is also conveyed brilliantly with the beaming smiles of the survivors. Less is more, and it’s real.

  • Karin Ferngren
    12 July 2010

    The ad was very moving and made me feel emotional…to the point!

  • Su ter Robinson
    12 July 2010

    The advert had little impact on me, the message wasn’t strong enough. I lost my civil partner two years ago to Lung Cancer. We had a few weeks after Chemo and radiotherapy and a PET scan to think she had beaten it, but it came back with avengence and she died about 6 weeks after being given the news that the cancer was back and was in the base of her spine.
    I think it would be nice to see an advert that shows some specifics – how some of the research has had a positive impact on some peoples lives – kind of , our research found this, we developed that, and the treatment based on this reasearch was given to X and look they have survived, but there is still alot we dont know, and alot of people still to help, and we can only do it with your suport – that kind of senario
    lets see some positives

  • Maurice T
    12 July 2010

    I thought the advert was moving, direct, and to the point. I also liked the fact that there were no actors which kept it real.

  • Jeannie
    12 July 2010

    Thank you for giving me the chance of giving you my opinion on your advert. Overall, it’s fine but I did find it a little ordinary. And what about the people who go on to get secondaries/recurrences. Wouldn’t they find it frightening? After getting cancer this is one of the biggest fears – believe me I know as a four years misdiagnosed cancer patient. I would like to have seen something being said about personal awareness. Both age and awareness could have been incorporated into the advert. I think more people are likely to donate if they find it is also educating them. I thought that the sentence broken into bits by separate individuals requires an attention span that demands too much for an advert. An advert should be easy on the ear and eye, requiring little concentration; this requires just a little too much attention.

  • Jeni
    12 July 2010

    I found it very moving. I think it has more impact listening to people who have had to live through diagnosis and treatment, either as a patient or doctor.

    I have nothing but admiration for everyone involved in this research and am happy to continue supporting something which I believe makes a difference.

  • Heather
    12 July 2010

    It would have been much more positive to have had the ‘sometimes we have to tell people bad news’ first and then the ‘however more often we can say … the chemo has worked etc …. because of the research and improvements being made.’

  • Judith
    12 July 2010

    Having been through this myself I can see where the ad is coming from and its good, simple and to the point, dont make it some sort of odd ball show, simple and to the point well done Its great

  • Bijan Riazi-Farzad
    12 July 2010

    Powerful message, delivered well. However what is important is whether people will take action, hence the following:

    I think that the advert will remind those who are already willing to donate to do so (as the responses here seem to suggest). However, in order to convert more people into donors, I would suggest taking a couple of leaveds from the psychologists’ book. The adver will firstly need to answer the question, “What have other people’s donaitons done already and how wuill my donation help” (in other words, including some of CRC’s success stories). Secondly, we need to bear in mind what Ross and Nisbett (1991) call ‘channel factors’. This is where, once the people are converted, one makes it particularly easy for them to take action. For example, ‘Text £2 to 12345’ to register/to donate/to setup a subscription/to gt further information/etc. (I will leave the exact details to the experts, but in this way, you can get a list of contact details from those who are interested too.

    I wish you well in your campaign

  • Sue
    12 July 2010

    To make the public sit up and listen, adverts must show real people dealing with the situation, I feel you have captured it withthis advert and i’m sure many will identify with it. It would be powerful to see the loved ones/carers portrayed to show their fight within this campaign and those who volunteer the trail drugs, that may not necessarily help them but help others In the future.

  • AnneD
    12 July 2010

    For me this advert hits the spot. It’s simple, direct and quickly paints a picture of what Cancer patients have to go through using the phrases ‘it’s gone’ or ‘it’s come back’. Surely that’s the thing to get across to the public about Cancer – you’ve either got it or you haven’t.
    Let’s hope the advert achieves it’s objective to raise more money and make sure Cancer has really gone – for good!

  • Alastair
    12 July 2010

    Great advert. One addition could be to highlight the many energised ways to give to cancer research at the end of the advert, such as fun runs, sponsored walks etc as well as monthly donations.

  • Elaine
    12 July 2010

    I think this advert is superb. The different voices do make it a little fragmented but you only have 40 seconds and it is so key to show at the same time that cancer is indiscriminate, touching young and old, black and white, male and female. I am an extrmemly fit, healthy, non smoking vegetarian teetotal survivor.
    I also think the abscence of music is right as there is no music, just a hollow shocking silence when someone tells you you have cancer. I also think it is right to end with the lady who’s cancer has returned. It may seem negative but it is the truth of what we live with. I first had cancer at 15yrs of age and in January was diagnosed with a completely unrelated cancer aged just 31. I never thought I would be in this position and now live with the fear that I will get it again and again until it gets me. I did cry watching this but there are still people out there who have no idea what we go through and we need to tell it how it is. The use of, very courageous, real sufferers and hospital staff is essential; the reality of it shows in their eyes. Thank you to all involved in creating this advert.

  • Justine Oldfield
    12 July 2010

    Very moving but with a clear and honest message.

  • Ryan
    12 July 2010

    I dont want to sound negative about the ad, but I found the voice changing between every phrase right annoying, to the point that if i were to see this more than once it would be an irritant and in no way encourage me to donate. I never saw anything that made me know these people wer non actors either.
    Im a supporter of raising funds, Ive lost ny mum, dad, older 2 brothers and a sister to cancer and at 37 I have now outlived both my brothers who I lost. Im have in the past few months found out im going to outlive my own 3 year old son to this hell. I just don’t think this ad conveys any sign of the pain, feeling of loss and no hope that sufferers and their loved ones experience. Wny not just show an intimate interview with a family who went through it (but sadly never made it), explain they are genuine, explain that this time we never had the answers, but end on the hope and push to not just feel helpless and stive for the day where there is true hope..

    but thank you for every thing you do for us, If it wasn’t for the work and people invloved I don’t even think I’d be here today, and I am not or ever been a sufferer..

  • Keith Baines
    12 July 2010

    It reinforces my desire to keep the monthly donations going following the loss of my wife, friend and soulmate after 38 years. It is to the point, keep up the good work!

  • Mags Cummings
    12 July 2010

    Should read ‘both uplifting and very moving……….’

  • Mags Cummings
    12 July 2010

    I found the ad uplifting and very moving as unfortunately there will always be people who don’t have a positive outcome until we find the cure and I suppose that is what will encourage folk to donate.

    I help in a fundraising group and will continue to do so as long as I am able, being one of ‘the lucky ones’ still surviving after two episodes of breast cancer.

  • John Whittaker
    12 July 2010

    Clear, powerful message well delivered.

  • karen
    12 July 2010

    very good advert straight to the point.

  • Maxine
    12 July 2010

    Sometimes it is by donating that we hold a vain hope that we may not contact cancer.

  • Nick
    12 July 2010

    Great advert, very poignant.

  • Tina Weller
    12 July 2010

    I thought it was simple and to the point. very moving towards the end. I think music would distract viewers. The fact is when people receive such very difficult news; there is no music in the background.

  • Christine
    12 July 2010

    A very powerful advert which will affect everyone who sees it whether they have been touched by cancer or not. I have lost two close family members to cancer and know how it affects peoples lives. Anything which draws attention to this horrible illness and brings it to the forefront of people’s minds can only be a good thing. Keep up the hard work.

  • Ann Lewis
    12 July 2010

    I lost my sister to Cancer to cancer two years ago whilst under the care of Mr McNeish, one of the consultants used in your ad. He had to give my sister the terrible ‘it’s come back’ news and she died three months later at the age of 41. Her care was first class and I cannot rate Mr McNeish highly enough. It brought tears to my eyes to see him in the ad because of the memories it evoked but I am glad he is helping to front the campaign. I have now lost both my parents and a sister to cancer and I hope that through continued fund raising for Cancer Research, I will not lose any further members of my family to this terrible disease. I think it is a wonderful advert and agree that any music in the background would detract from the stark message it is trying to convey.

  • Zoe
    12 July 2010

    I think this is a very moving advert. When it is aired will it say that there is no actors involved as this was what was very touching for me.
    I feel that it is important to add in the message that the people suffering from loss of love ones, seeing their love ones suffer and especially for those with cancer that they are not alone. Usually at the end of the adverts there is an uplifting message, ‘together we can beat cancer’. Will this be added?

  • Kate
    12 July 2010

    I like it, but I really think that an advert of the future shoud be much more hard hitting. Although it is promoting something completely different i am aware.. the stop smoking campaign adverts are often quite raw and hard hitting. I really feel with one about cancer it NEEDS to be hard hitting because this is what it is like for the x amount of months for a cancer sufferer or their family trying to help and support them through it. To be hard hitting it NEEDS to show real life emotion to its full… cancer is an awful illness in so many ways and therefore the raw emotion is often also with family and friends of the sufferer too. This really needs to be illustrated alongside powerful facts about cancer perhaps or perhaps people in the background asking.. ‘why cant they cure it’.. ‘why me’… ‘what if’.. etc etc (types of questions), real cries of pain and worry in the background.. the natural questions and emotions you do ask and go through when you suffer something serious that is uncertain. Text at the end needs to be powerful and thought provoking something like.. “You dont have to be a doctor or nurse to help, by donating… to someone… you helped to defend them and can really help make the world of difference! Have an immagination; put yourself in the situation.. what would you hope people did?” Some kind of hard hitting text at the end of an advert which comes up whilst there is silence at the end, i feel leaves a more lasting impact! especially when there has been noise of emotion previously. The things that create a lump in my throat are the things I often end up looking into more and then donating to!!

  • Fleur Blanford
    12 July 2010

    Very effective but I felt it ended on a rather negative rather than positive note. Whilst this is realistic and clearly CR are raising awareness and much needed funds this way, personally it left me feeling a bit gloomy! I think if my treatment was happening now, the image of the last frame and the reaction of the person having been told the cancer had come back would (an actually did as a past cancer patient) leave me feeling sad and a little afraid. With so many positive angles to promote, whilst completly appropriate to be honest about cancer, a bit of a message ‘sandwich’ (the good, the not so good ending with the good)would have been the angle I would like to have seen.

  • Gareth Vankieiwcz
    12 July 2010

    Very powerful advert, hart breaking as just suffed a friend loseing there battle on saturday, lets fight it toghter.

  • Janet Taylor
    12 July 2010

    Whatever gets the message across, in order that people donate to cancer research is a good thing. I was diagnosed with breast cancer almost 2 years ago and I know how vitally important this research is. I think most people know someone who has been affected by cancer and a small donation of £2 a month isn’t a lot when you consider how many people benefit from this researcxh.

  • Joy Beddows
    12 July 2010

    Again,another very much needed advert,and very much to the point.
    My only gripe is that,as with the last advert, it ends on a negative note which doesn’t tell the whole story.
    If the terminally ill lady (who I feel is very brave to do the advert) was followed by the fact that,with more money,more people could hear those magic words (the cancer’s gone,you’re in remission,the tumour’s shrunk etc),perhaps people would be more inclined to want to make that happen.
    My husband is terminally ill with bowel/lung/liver cancers,and he has been on palliative care for over 3 years following his 6 months initial prognosis.
    He has had bad new and fought hard,had good news which we celebrated,and generally been on a cancer roller-coaster for the past 3 years.
    He is currently on his 5th course of chemo…his liver is trying hard to give up (but he won’t let it!!),and although the doctor’s and Macmillan nurse are ‘rather sombe’ when we see them,we still laugh and enjoy life…..our positivity is what has kept him alive…along with the chemo,of course!
    I myself had choriocarcinoma ( a rare cancer caused by a malformed pregnancy) in 1976,and the whole treatment was developed using donations (prior to this time the only treatment was hysterectomy followed by chemo and crossed fingers).I have since had my son in 1978,and so far,an extra 34 years of life!!
    So although it is likely that there will always be some cases which are not diagnosed until they are terminal( or in-operable,as my husband was initially told), it is the fact that life CAN go on,even with a terminal diagnoses that needs addressing,so life PROLONGING drugs can be discovered.
    By the way,I like the ‘no music’ idea.

  • Geoff
    12 July 2010

    An OK ad. But all these charity adverts make me feel that I don’t need to donate if thery can afford to waste money on expensive TV ads. As a prostate cancer survivor I know I’m wrong but these ads can cause a negative reaction?

  • RICHARD
    12 July 2010

    I thought it was a good advert- hard hitting but subtle and leaves you thinking- it could be you.

  • theredsockcampaign
    12 July 2010

    I am terminally ill with prostate cancer because of LATE diagnosis.
    Your advert ia a good way to get the point over, I know it will be destressing for many who have lost dear ones to cancer.
    BUT unless we advertise for research into early detection and research into cures then we will make no progress.
    BUT why no mention of the BIGGEST cancer killer of men PROSTATE CANCER yet again we are the poor relation just not sexy enough I suppose. Keith Cass

  • Sue
    12 July 2010

    To make the public sit up and listen, adverts must show real people dealing with the situation, I feel you have captured it withthis advert and i’m sure many will identify with it. It would be powerful to see the loved ones/carers portrayed to show their fight within this campaign and those who volunteer the triall drugs, that may not necessarily help them but help others In the future.

  • Gill Branston
    12 July 2010

    Very effective and moving. The absence of music, the stillness, is a plus, especially as this message may be scheduled in the middle of very aurally ‘busy’ programmes. Loved especially the woman’s silent ‘gulp’ moment in the section on bad news.
    One tiny point: not sure of the proportion of women to men in cancer treatment generally,but would be good if you could in future use a few more women in what at first looks like an all-male line up of ‘doctor figures’ here.

  • Neil Watson
    12 July 2010

    Sorry about the spelling mistake above. It should read: “prospective subsciber” – thanks. Neil.

  • Neil Watson
    12 July 2010

    This is advert is laid out very well. I particularly like the mixing of the negative and postive aspects and the timings. It must be very hard to get the message across in just a few seconds and this available period is very nearly utilised to the full. However, I would like to hear at the end of the advert that all donations and contibutions to the research are absolutely vital as this can be a most reassuring point to any prosctive subsciber.

  • Heather McNiven
    12 July 2010

    I’ve just watched your new TV advert. As always, it is SO REAL: the shock of diagnosis, the endless treatment for it, the relief at the end of the treatment and the fear that it may come back. I know we try to keep that fear on the back burner but nonetheless it’s always there… Yes, your advert points out that cancer treatment has come a long way and for many it’s good news, but the bottom line is that the battle isn’t completely won yet and further research can only be carried out with further funding, and financial support from the public is crucial in this. I supported cancer research for years before my diagnosis; you never know when it might be your turn… Without the support you have received in the past, I probably wouldn’t be alive today! Please keep your advert exactly as it is – we can’t afford a happy ending yet!!!

  • Margaret Edwards
    12 July 2010

    A good advert – hard hitting, but hopeful. Perhaps it should end with an upbeat story? Definitely no music needed. Each item just a little too short, resulting in a confused response from viewer at such fast switching to next person. Thankyou to the people willing to share their stories. I agree with Sarah’s point about prevention as well as cure.

  • Liz Short
    12 July 2010

    Very succinct, no frill just the facts. Treatment for cancer is there, but, unfortunately at the moment not all can be cured. We need Cancer research UK

  • Esther
    12 July 2010

    I’ve watched the ad just once. It’s to the point, but I found it quite negetive; perhaps necessary to empasise that (much) more money is needed for research, but the after-taste it’s left with me is bitter.

  • Julie Heslop
    12 July 2010

    Thought the advert was very good, I remember when my doctor had to tell me, I had cancer, it must be really hard for them. Hopefully this will encourage people to give two pounds a month, as you never know if they will be next and need your help.

  • Stuart Capeling
    12 July 2010

    Another good advert which gets to the point very accurately, the anguish that this desease causes can be seen but also the relief that a good outcome brings, however there is always that chance of “it’s back” always brings a tear to my eyes even 6 years on.
    Keep up the good work and thank you from myself and my family.

    Stuart

  • Brooke Knight
    12 July 2010

    A great advert and straight to the point. My mum suffered from Cervical Cancer but is now fully fit and healthy and did the Canadian bike cycle last year and raised a lot of money for cancer research. I hope the advert affects people and make them think about. who it can affect and it can affect everyone and anyone.

  • Anna Robins
    12 July 2010

    I like the advert and it feels very real, especially the last scene. As others have said, perhaps music would enhance the message that is being delivered – this would ‘tap in’ to those who respond more to audible than visual messages.

  • Sarah Matthews
    12 July 2010

    I like the ad – it really gets the point across. My only concern is that so much cancer focus seems to be on treatment rather than screening for pre-cancerous cells and I’d be interested to know how much money is invested in prevention rather than cure?

  • Fiona Daniel
    12 July 2010

    I like it a lot…it is what it is very sad but honest. I lost my father last year to bowel cancer, it still hurts but it is reality. No music, however if you did want a song I think Sade By Your Side would be perfect…but not necessary.

  • deb phillps
    12 July 2010

    Adverts like this make me feel uncomfortable and upset, especially as my Mother is termanlly ill with cancer. Unfortunatly I know of too many people that have been affected by cancer so research is vital to help stop this horrible desease. Therefore despite my discomfort avderts like this must continue to be shown. This is an effective advert and to the point.

  • Dick Smith
    12 July 2010

    I like many find it fragmented but that will not matter once you have seen it a few times and it is short no doubt because of the cost of running it on TV. One point I think you could include is that all cancer sufferers past and current should be contributors if they can. Asking you question as you have has cleared my mind and motivated me to pay up – why?

    Eighteen months ago I was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer which has some complications and cannot be removed but is “under control” I saw at first hand the developments that have taken place in the treatment of this sector and wonderd at the cost. My wife and I were just getting our heads around this when two months ago she was diagnosed with Bowel Cancer and she is just starting Chemo and Radiotherapy so we have a double dose between us and know full well what is required in terms of cost to treat and cure this terrible condition.

    Some parts of the world have very low rates or nil rates of cancer, as in Heart conditions, I think that is where research should be concentrated as well as repair of that afflicted. But I digress – it might be a bit hard nosed and in your face to ask those with Cancer to contribute but I dont think so and will be signing up this week for it is us sufferers that know where the money is spent!

    Keep up the good work and thank you.

    Dick

  • Dennis Roof
    12 July 2010

    I think the new advertising campaign will help this great charity continue to raise awareness of cancers and the fact that if detected early enough there is more chance of light being at the end of the tunnel and that any money donated is well invested helping to keep this vital research continuing, fantastic!!

  • Angela Wilson-North
    12 July 2010

    Very moving and for me re-lives the time my husband and I were told he had bowel cancer and despite the best treatment died within a year aged 52. Although watching this type of advertisement will upset me the message has to be delivered and you have done it in a very professional yet emotive way. Well done and keep up the good work.

  • Paulette Morris
    12 July 2010

    I lost my brother to cancer and find this advert straightforward and to the point. It’s comforting to know that cancer is now spoken about openly and that the stigma that existed with having cancer many years ago no longer exists. Well done cancer UK!!

  • Janet Crompton
    12 July 2010

    A simple advert with a very powerful and thought provoking message.

    I did Race for Life yesterday and found it so very moving to see how many people have been touched by cancer, either personally or have lost family and friends.

    I ran in memory of my father in law and two friends who lost their fight against cancer. I also know someone who is undergoing treatment.

    The sooner we can eradicate this terrible disease, the better.

    I like the directness of the advert and the fact that real people are used.

  • Mrs Susan Millard
    12 July 2010

    Music would detract from this very moving message. My sister had breast cancer and now has secondary cancer. It is a slow growing cancer for which I am grateful, but on the other hand doesn’t bear thinking about that she is dying albeit very slowly. Keep up the good work that you all do for this dreadful disease.

  • Charlotte
    12 July 2010

    This is an important and worthwhile ad. Cancer is a terrible, yet real threat in our society and it impacts so many individuals and families. We can’t hide from it or pretend it doesn’t exist – painful as it is to confront. We need ads such as these, shown at peak viewing times, so that we can appeal for that crucial support. I realise they bring back painful memories – I know – I have lost my Nan, my aunt, my cousin and a dear school pupil to cancer. My mother has survived it. I thank God for the medical professionals; the workers in the hospices and the support groups all doing what they can. We need to continue to do what we can to push back against this disease. Let’s celebrate every bit of good news, every medical advance, each step in the right direction – at the same time, let’s not be intimidated by this disease. However painful it is to remember, let the memory of the pain increase our resolve to make a difference, and to fight back.

  • Colette Smith
    12 July 2010

    I viewed the new advert at 7.00 this morning when i arrived at work. After watching it once i watched it again. This advert works and the message has got through to me. It has definetly given me a lot to think about.
    Lets hope that it has the same effects on others and raises awareness of Cancer and the amazing work that Cancer research are continuing to do.
    Cancer is everybodys responsability – its time for us all to do what we can, while we can.

  • Jeremy Butterfield
    12 July 2010

    The second series of shots of doctors has them saying just one word each, which makes it very fragmented indeed.

    If you happened on the add midway, you wouldn’t know what was going on.

    On the plus side: mentioning four different types of cancer gets the message across about how it affects different groups.

    I think music would help, and I like Brian James’s suggestion of a narrative, like the BT ad.

    Whether the people are real or not doesn’t matter to the audience, as they won’t know, but having real people may be important as a morale booster.

  • Helen Fountain
    12 July 2010

    Very moving an emotional, straight to the point and hits home.

  • Joanne Morrison
    12 July 2010

    this campaign is powerful and attantion grabbing and will bring a greater awareness to the difficulties and triumphs faced by people everyday. I survived an advanced cancer at 26 and skin cancer at 45 both very frightening experiences. 18 months ago I had a Brain tumour removed and this was fortunately benign. without the technology and skill of the medical profession I would no be here. I remain optomistic and I can say that life is to short and should be lived. I work with families and cancer patients to show them how positive thoughts and actions can make a difference. I will always be grateful for the help and suport and dedication of cancer research, doctors and nurses. Thank You

  • Val B
    12 July 2010

    I used to donate £2 then increased it to £4, but cancelled it when I received three identical Xmas catalogs, I wonder how many other donaters experienced the same waste of money, and paper? Is Cancer Research better organised and less wastefull nowadays?

  • mrs jean mitchell
    12 July 2010

    I have lost a brother to cancer he was only 41 and in 2007 I lost my husband to cancer .When he was told he had just 3 months he said in years to come they will find cures for all cancers. As a family we support cancer research as much as possible also the macmillian nurses. keep up the good work the advert is to the point it does not need music.

  • Debbie
    12 July 2010

    When my husband was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer last June, it was so difficult watching the tv, as every break seemed to play the Cancer Reasearch Campaign advertisment. Sadly, a year on, he passed away and again it will make it uneasy for me to sit through the breaks, but I do feel that the campaigns remind people that cancer treatment is getting better and is helping a lot of people. So many people are now touched by cancer. The advert just brings it home to all of us.

  • Julie Keett
    12 July 2010

    Simple, realistic and visual of patient at the end emmotive but we all know people who have had chemo and the effects. Brilliant ad hope you raise more money for the continuing research.

  • Gemma
    12 July 2010

    Liked the advert. Simple voices is hard hitting and as someone else said, its a good balance of optimism and stark reality. But I agree-I found it difficult to concentrate on the message because it was so fragmented with different voices.

  • Brian James
    12 July 2010

    I think I understand the idea behind the making of the advert, but as others, I find it too fragmented by some of the people only saying one word. I found myself having to work out who was speaking at any time – a doctor or a patient? I think the message is lost by this method, and I think people will find it irritating as an advert on TV. A more powerful visual image is needed, as in drink driving adverts. Or perhaps a series similar to the BT Broadband adverts, where people are filmed receiving treatment, hairloss, etc, but then ‘improving’ as a result of early diagnosis and treatment. I realise this would maybe involve actors rather than real patients, but it isn’t clear in the actual advert that real people involved with cancer are talking.

  • Andy
    12 July 2010

    I have had cancer in my life for 25 years, my dad got diagnosed with bladder cancer when I was a baby. He goes for laser surgery every year. Just recently he was told he was in the clear and as that happened we wer told our gran had breast cancer. I have had a hard life and I totally understand every family that has had to go through the same. I think this advert is great a little upsetting but it works! Do not change anything about it. Please please donate what ever you can. You never know it could be you that needs the help from cancer research one day.

  • Jude B
    12 July 2010

    The idea of various patients and medical staff speaking is excellent – although I agree it is very fragmented – just two or three words per person would make it flow better.

    It would be so much more effective if the advert ended with positive information regarding the treatments that are now available and improved survival rates because of the incredible research carried out over the years.

    Also, I think much more should be made of the fact that there is no public funding for this essential work – and why limit the request to £2 – why not “only £2 a month would make a difference but if you can afford a little more … ” or something similar?

    I’ve supported your organisation for over 30 years and long may you continue – thank you so much for all you do.

  • Merav Cunningham
    12 July 2010

    I think the advert should end on a good/positive note and not that “it’s come back”. It’s very depressing and discouraging for patients and those who wish to donate. The main idea should be that with time, research and people’s donations we will beat cancer, but the way the advert ended and the look on the woman’s face left me hopeless and sad.
    I did not like the advert at all.

  • Sahira
    12 July 2010

    For Susan and others like her: None of us can hold on to loved ones but life (our life) is precious so we must go on without them; think positively; take care of ourselves, and look towards those who have also suffered and may be less fortunate. Lend them a helping hand; smile for them and embrace the warmth of the smiles they return.

    But I agree, a warning sign before the advert begins might help people like Susan to avoid the pain of watching.

    Unfortunately, like Neil H, I wasn’t very convinced by the advert. I found the skipping from one person to another rather disturbing, and I only know they are real patients and doctors because you told me so.

    Whilst it certainly touches the hearts of those who fully understand the message – cancer sufferers, survivors and their families – it doesn’t seem powerful enough to effect others. It’s tame, undramatic and untraumatic.

    Have no doubts – cancer is wild, dramatic and traumatic, and loaded with grief and sorrow. With courage, too.

    But I hope your advert proves me wrong.

    Finally, we need, as others have mentioned, a strong, well-organised, well-funded, aggressive campaign which not only creates awareness of all the different types of cancer that plague mankind but focusses on ways to PREVENT them.

  • Marie Williams
    12 July 2010

    Only real downside for me is the “Oh God!” This is not my experience of medical professionals. Perhaps the good news faces could have been at the end rather than the bad news face. The absence of music makes the advert matter of fact, which cancer is. I like the fact that the advert covers more common specific cancers (testicular, breast, leukemia) whilst including most other cancers (“the tumour’s shrunk”). An update on improvements in treatment due to CRUK donations may help bring in more.

  • Mary
    12 July 2010

    I think this campaign is direct and totally honest and should stir the general public to donate. The thing we all seem to have in common is our personal experience of cancer which is why I have appreciated reading all your comments. Both my parents died of cancer, my youngest sister and only niece are in remission from cancer and baby William aged 18 months is being treated for leukaemia (CRUK MyProjects William’s Giving Group).We need to keep positive and believe we can succeed and beat it. There are so many amazing CRUK projects needing our financial support we must spread the word even though it may cause heartache and bring back terrible personal memories. Remembering Mia who died aged one year from ALL and baby William who has a difficult time ahead.

  • Louis Radford
    12 July 2010

    By having different people say a phrase each, the advertisement is too fragmented and hard to follow, as well as irritating.

    It would have been better to have had just one doctor and one patient.

  • Geoffrey Morris
    12 July 2010

    I believe that statistics regarding money are important. There is nothing in the advert relating to this aspect. The advert could be sub-titled during its playing with for example- “current donations are £60,000 per day, we require £95,000 per day to maintain the pace of our work. (the amounts shown are purely to illustrate my point. I do not know the actual figures). I am a survivor, nine years on, and am greatly indebted to the wonderful work of C R U K .

  • Steve Salmon
    11 July 2010

    I like the advert, but I feel it is perhaps just a little too short. Something about what is happening in terms of reserch and some positive statistics should in my opnion be added.

    Marks out of ten …8

  • Michael Miller
    11 July 2010

    Hi
    Good advert, but sorry to be negative, but Cancer Research UK advert shud finish up a little more positive, to make people want to donate. It started well and yes cancer can be very negative, but u shouldnt make want to be donaters feel like that, as you will make them feel…what is the point!
    Michael

  • Thomasina Dearlove
    11 July 2010

    Straight to the point and very emotional, especially to those people already affected – who to my understanding usually support the cause anyway. Would like to see a high profile campaign focusing on the importance of early detection.

  • Tracy
    11 July 2010

    It’s an excellent idea to use real people instead of actors….it’s a really good advert.

  • Sharen Freeman
    11 July 2010

    Any advert that appeals to the general public will create some kind of emotion. Anyone who has been in the unfortunate ‘place’ receiving the cancer news, will be affected by the advert even more than the unaffected, but we must all learn to reach out to help others and continue to raise awareness of cancer research. Good luck to all the fund raisers and Good luck to all of you beating cancer. God Bless each and every one of you. Sharen

  • janet duggan
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert has a big impact, is very direct and to the point it doesn’t need anything else.

  • Susan Russell
    11 July 2010

    Hard hitting and emotional but hard to watch when you have a loved one living with secondary cancer and managing to live a quality of life. It is not very positive or encouraging to these people. i think it should have stopped at the up beat part and still have had the same punch.

  • Sheila Darbyshire
    11 July 2010

    Perfect as it is, straight to the point. It will hit home,leave it as it is

  • Grace Odumosu
    11 July 2010

    simple and straight to the point.perfect

  • Anne Nicholl
    11 July 2010

    I think it’s very good to feature real doctors and survivors. People who have never been touched by cancer either personally or through someone they know cannot imagine the devastating effect.
    The joy on the faces of those who got good news is wonderful.
    Anything that gets that important message across is what’s needed. Let’s hope this film will.
    We lost a nephew to cancer recently. He had fought it for years and tried to be so positive. He was inspirational.

    I had to have investigative surgery 5 years ago and although I was told at the biopsy stage it was negative we were very afraid, your whole world stops it really does.
    The joy when I got the all clear result was tremendous
    I have a completely different outlook on life now because of that experience and that was after only a scare! Imagine how the survivors in the film must feel.
    I really do hope this film gets people to think.
    We donate monthly and wish it could be more than we do.

  • francesca
    11 July 2010

    Great advert. Simple message. Positive response now needed.I am in Race for life next week and will not stop running,till the reasons to stop.Run Out. Never give up the fight

  • Lorraine Kielty
    11 July 2010

    Brilliant advert. No need to add to it in any way,direct to the point. It tells me cancer is not the death sentence it once was and that comes over well..

    Like someone else said £1.00 a week from every wage packet would not be missed for such a worth while cause.

  • Pamela Wallace
    11 July 2010

    I think this new campaign will really hit home as there can not be many families in the land who have not been touched by cancer in some way, it does not need any music to make it more poignant it just tells it like it is and I hope with more research even more people will get a good news diagnosis.

  • Julie
    11 July 2010

    I think the ad is good. Perhaps something about ‘race for life’, encouraging more people to take part would be an idea.
    Also, maybe some music in the background too.

  • Gill Hart
    11 July 2010

    I liked the advert straight facts with a balance of hope and reality of spread. Thanks to the bravery of the folk who contributed. Personally whilst I understand the thoery of music theme I think it would be harder to ‘ hear ‘ the message .I think this ad could well stimulate people to feel they could make a difference by donating and being part of the answer

  • Chris
    11 July 2010

    Good advert, not too much in your face as some of the other charities. The funding which you recive is viatal to your continued research and my dad is testement to how things have progressed. He has 4 different types of cancer which have developed over 10 years and the treatment which he is receiving now is markedly differnt from when he first received it. Thank you for your continued work which is very important both on a personal level and for others who will no doubt face similar circumstances

  • Alison Rolf
    11 July 2010

    As usual, your advertisement has the right balance of emotion and fact. Everyone knows someone who has had cancer and I never have any trouble getting people to sponsor me for running events when I tell them it is for Cancer Research. I also like the fact that you are only asking for £2 per month. So many charities are greedy and want so much and it’s impossible to give to everything. Keep up the good work.

  • Hugh Gunn
    11 July 2010

    It’s a great advert, but why no mention of Prostate Cancer. There never is, although it kills over 10,000 men per year.

  • val allan
    11 July 2010

    Hope it will bring in the much needed donations on a regular basis to carry on the vital research. So near to a cure but so far for some.
    Great that the people in the ad know what they are talking about…WELL DONE

  • Sheena Gilmour
    11 July 2010

    The advert is good, it is simple, effective and straight to the point – no music is necessary. I’ve been there, you never forget how you felt when diagnosed. I’m lucky, I’ve survived.

  • Marion
    11 July 2010

    Have just lost a friend to cancer. I hope this advert will make people more aware of the awful end rsult for so many people. Cancer is none selective of age or gender so much more can be acheived with more funding.

  • Mike
    11 July 2010

    This is about getting the message out there and illiciting funding – it has been proved that music works to enhance the message. This can be done without taking away the impact of the words or indeed the silent woman.

    Good luck and let’s all keep working on to deal with this.

  • James Cork
    11 July 2010

    I love the add. It’s down to earth and gets right to the point. I watched 3 of my family die with it, and know first hand what it’s like to wait for results. I was very lucky with the great strides that modern medicine has reached. Thanks to all those who have donated to Cancer Research UK, I’m still here, and now support Cancer Reaserch UK in the hope that more people like me can have more time to enjoy life.

  • Peter Lakin
    11 July 2010

    Excellent work. Stark but more effective without music.

  • Naomi Saunders
    11 July 2010

    I agree with the advert ending on: ‘this isn’t over; we still need your help’.

    I also agree wthat it is a bit fragmented which can make it a hard to follow. With regards to a soundtrack – i think this can be emotionally effective e.g. the campaign with the “fields of gold” soundtrack, however, I also think this approach using simple, concise factual messages coming from people who have been touched by cancer has a more raw, shocking, and “to the point” effect. I also think the ad should show a message at the beginning stating that no actors were used during its production and a “warning logo” for those going through a particularly difficult time with cancer.

    I think the lady who says nothing is necessary, not to say that the return of cancer is final, but to show that more help and research is required to prevent this. It is what makes the massage hit home and makes it effective.

  • Ro
    11 July 2010

    Excellent advert, but fragmented. If people wish to donate but do not have the funds, do the Race For Life and get others to sponsor you. It is surprising how much can be raised, and for such a worthwhile cause. Please keep up the good work.

  • Monika Fitzgerald
    11 July 2010

    Excellent! Please no music! £2 a month is affordable to most working people. I always sponsor my daughter’s walks for cancer.

  • Lynn
    11 July 2010

    I know there is a need to make people aware of cancer and the research needed BUT when you have seen your children deal with the real situation of being told their Dad has liver cancer and may not have much time to live it makes it hard for them to re-live it every time an advert for Cancer research comes on. Last year I regularly had a chorus of ‘turn the advert off, Mum’. This was usually as we were trying to relax and forget the reality of our life with cancer. Thankfully a year on my husband is recovering due to a brilliant team in Leeds and Hull. Please can the time of airing be sensitive to small children who may just be going through what we have been through. Thank you keep up the good work.

  • sarah
    11 July 2010

    PERFECT.

  • Emma Saini
    11 July 2010

    I feel the advert gets straight to the point, & hits the right spot, I agree with some off the others comments made with regards 2 using real people excellent, possibly some music as like the one lady said it always sticks in ur mind when you hear that song which would help with getting more publicity which would in turn increase donations.

    The only thing i would suggest Is to mention some off the cancers that people regards as “I’ll never have that” or brush under the carpet I.e skin or bowel cancer or others that are more common instead off using the cancers we are all aware off & look for as the increase in patients I have nursed especially with bowel cancer all say “I wish I had talked about it instead off feeling to embarrassed to mention my bowel habits as it probably would off have been found sooner”

    Hope this helps. Good job to all who appeared in the ad & keep up the good work x

  • Helene Webb
    11 July 2010

    I like what the ad is trying to convey but find the quick scene changing very irritating ~ I respect the fact that real medics and cancer patients have participated, but you should let them talk rather than allowing the marketing men in suits take over the genuine message.

  • Liz
    11 July 2010

    I work in advertising and would be proud to put my name to this ad. The aim is to get people thinking about ‘what if’s’ without forcing stories upon the viewer – there are too many to tell.

    It would have been easy to use actors but the real emotion would have been missed. I think it’s a superb piece of work and the lack of music was probably quite deliberate. Music means different things to different people, but words say it all. Coupled with visible emotions in eyes and faces, there was nothing more music could have added. I only hope it meets it purpose. Well done.

  • Sonia Pring
    11 July 2010

    I raise funds for Nottingham Cancer research UK and often cook the food for all of our guests..many of whom have been touched by cancer. .I have had cancer and this advert is real and punchy .. no sound required..your cases feel genuine in their survival and “the monkey on your shoulder”..will it come back is always prevalent in my quietest moment when I watch a skylark soaring and strangely enough in my happiest moments say when I play a good hole at golf or kiss my gorgeous neices.I count my blessings and say Thank You for my life.
    You do a great job for us all
    In case it comes back!

  • Gladys
    11 July 2010

    Very effective. Simple and to the point. The words say it all – but the expression and silence of the last person hits home.

  • Anne
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert deals effectively with the reality of having cancer. For some there is good news and for others the news is bad. The use of real people makes such a difference – the authenticity of their words, both those cancer patients and the people treating them, could not be immitated by even the best actors. I think music would detract from the strength of the words.

  • Ellie Cook
    11 July 2010

    I think your new advert is very real and direct but I have to say it didn’t really move me as much as some of your earlier ads. Lets hope this catches the public eye and Cancer Research get the response it deserves.

    Ellie Cook

  • nista Sham
    11 July 2010

    Great advert, very emotional and straight to the point. I always take part in 5k every year. Up to now i have done 3 Race for Life and i will keep on doing it as far as i can to help in a way. “COME ON PEOPLE TOGETHER WE WILL MAKE IT!”

  • Jen Sutton
    11 July 2010

    Clearly , a powerful advert, but if the points were to be reversed – ie the good news last, I feel people would be more likely to dip into their pockets with hope and optimism, rather than – on the second showing – dread the ending!

  • Naomi Saunders
    11 July 2010

    Simple, conciceand raw. A very well communicated message. The ad is moving and envokes empathy for those who recieve bad news.

  • Diane
    11 July 2010

    Its a great advert especially as they are real people. I hope you get the response that you need to be able to continue with your great work.
    Lets hope the future is brighter for everyone.

  • Clare Atkins
    11 July 2010

    Watched the advert and found it very powerful. Great progress has already been made in this area in terms of people being more open to talking about cancer. What we need now is more people to donate to your on-going research. Keep up the good work. catkins.

  • Roy Abbott
    11 July 2010

    This advert is very good and passes a good and clear message, keep up the good work.

  • angela shackleford
    11 July 2010

    like this advert really works really makes you think about the effects cancer as on peoples lives.

  • Paul from York
    11 July 2010

    Today too many adverts are over produced. Maybe we will remember this message because it is simple and honest!

  • Chiza Kumwenda
    11 July 2010

    The advert is really really nice and thanks for investing your time in advocating for the fight against cancer!!

  • Sally-ann
    11 July 2010

    I thought it was right in every way. Everyone can get the disease. Young or old, whatever their nationality. The advert embraces this. Anyone who has had or knows someone who had cancer will feel emotion after seeing this as has everyone who has commented here. Cancer research does amazing work and I am grateful for the extra time it gave me and my family with a very dear young friend we will never ever forget and forever miss. Music or not, it strikes the cord. I honestly do not think there is anyone out there who does not know of someone who has been through it. I hope it is a success.

  • Lyn
    11 July 2010

    If you have not done so already – Race for life is a great way of donating . Last year I did the 5k and this year 10k. Walk, jog or run

  • Pauline Dobson
    11 July 2010

    I thought the new ad was thought provoking, sensitive and powerful, it did what it needed to do. Get a simple, powerful message across without being overly dramatic. Being told you have cancer is dramatic in it’s own right – it does not need music or ‘drama’. I think the ad portrays this well. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006, so I understand only too well what it is like to receive such news.
    Well done and good luck with this new campaign.

  • Kit Seville
    11 July 2010

    To the point,well crafted,memomorable.However I do agree with the first lady that left a rating,that some music would not go amiss,particularly as a hook for people that have not been affected.Music creates a strong recall,particularly with something like the Sinead O’Connor track.

  • Wendy
    11 July 2010

    A precise and to the point advert, do not spoil it with music.People need to know how devestating cancer is, not just for the sufferer but for the whole family.The work done by cancer research is vital to hopefully one day find a cure. I know how important their work is, I am a survivor of cancer and cancer research helped me and my family to come to terms with the disease. Keep up the fantastic work you do and thank you.

  • Pauline Bett
    11 July 2010

    To the point, simple and effective. It doesn’t need anything adding.

  • jacqueline from rotherhithe
    11 July 2010

    The comment made by lisa about how many of us that commented have put our thoughts in action. Well im one of many who have raised money for cancer,I ran the 10k last week and raised £500 I have already signed for next year 5k&10k! well done to kath miles for doing the 5k in newcastle ! and best of luck to you joanna king and friends for the 10k at blemhiem palace keep raising money for a great cancer research.
    again love and respect to everyone who cares
    jacqueline

  • Aaron S-C
    11 July 2010

    Brilliant advertisement. Music would be gratuitous. Closing the advert on the lady says: ‘this isn’t over; we still need your help’. Really hope that is generates charitable giving.

  • Maria Ritchie
    11 July 2010

    My Father died of cancer in 1990. Cancer Research has come a long way since then. My husband was diagnosed with cancer in 2006. After surgery and radiotherapy he is now 4 years clear. So I have seen it from both sides. I recently did Race for Life along with thousands of other ladies, but even so people need to be shown that funds are still needed. Using the media remains the most powerful way to get this message across. This advert is pitched just right. NO music is necessary.

  • Allison
    11 July 2010

    My comment above should read breast and not beast cancer, apologies

  • Ellen Currie
    11 July 2010

    This ad, like your last one, is perfect, no need for music,its simple and to the point, and very touching and poignant.

  • Cheryl H
    11 July 2010

    Moving, factual and engaging – lets hope it inspires a few more people to sign-up and donate

  • Amanda
    11 July 2010

    just right….lost my dad in April 6 weeks after his initial diagnosis with oseophageal cancer….so tough but am still pulling on my trainers in a few weeks time to do a 10K Race For Life,we HAVE to hope and research and fight for a future where this devastating disease is not so scary and outcomes are more positive. Like it with real people (how do you cast / choose?!!) and without music,also the suggestion previously in comments re.a logo “warning” if it’s a bad day…. Thank you for all you do in raising awareness.

  • Allison
    11 July 2010

    I think this advertisment is very succinct but perhaps it will mainly impact on those vulnerable people who have already beeen affected by cancer. Will it have the same impact on individuals who have not had the experience of cancer? I am not entirely sure. I was diagnosed with beast cancer last year and I will be interested to see what my childrens response is to this advertisment.

  • Kieran
    11 July 2010

    Hi,

    I really like this advert and hope this makes people realise what impact cancer has on peoples lifes

  • Martin Rand
    11 July 2010

    To the point, we’re all indebted to you. I’ll support this cause and the research for as long as it’s needed.

  • Patricia Birch
    11 July 2010

    Straight to the point.

  • arthur hodgen
    11 July 2010

    Having lost my father and brother in law last year to cancer I think anything that draws attention to the work cancer research does and encourages anyone to do anything they can to help is a success as I am sure this advert will music or not

  • Tracy Jardine
    11 July 2010

    I think this, and your last advertising campaign are excellent, perfectly depicting the reality of different situations (with no music)- but so much so I find they remind me each time too painfully of my own diagnosis in Jan 08. However – I am one of the lucky ones and in no small part owe this to your wonderful, tireless and dedicated work. Thank you.

  • arthur hodgen
    11 July 2010

    Having lost my father and brother in law last year to cancer I think anything that draws attention to the work cancer research does and encourages anyone to do anything they can to help is a sucess, as I am sure this advert will music or not

  • Tammie Sanders
    11 July 2010

    I saw this advert and like many others i had tears rolling down my face. I lost my father to Cancer 5 years ago and it doesn’t get easier. I know many others who have lost this battle and i’m only 25. I think the work that Cancer Research do is AMAZING!!! and all those brave people out their fighting this battle you are just hero’s i did the 10k race for life and have raised 549.00 so far. This advert will remind others that there are people like you and i that have suffered and incourage them to donate because you never know what is round the corner. x Decided to all those who lost the battle x

  • Nancy
    11 July 2010

    Really speaks to me as we lost my Father to cancer in January 2006. He’d had prostate cancer and received the all clear after surgery to remove his prostate, then some years later he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and passed away just over a month after his diagnosis. This advert describes the situation accurately. I have been crying on and off for the last five minutes. Powerful. Do no change anything about it.

  • Sheila Rose
    11 July 2010

    I have just done my first ever Race for Life at Newcastle today.The atmosphere was electric, the messages on the backs of the people in front were very poignant.
    I am a survivor and it’s good to see “real people”, it upsets me to see known actors on past adverts who whilst they may be good at their job,they can’t portray the real feelings behind Cancer.
    So please, keep it real and don’t put music to this advert and detract from the seriousness of this disease

  • Anne Roper
    11 July 2010

    Very emotional and powerful advert. Simple and to the point. I agree with previous comments. Needs nothing adding or taking away

  • Brian
    11 July 2010

    Well done with the add

    I am all for adverts and getting the message across to people that thankfully have never experienced cancer in there family history. I do get frustrated when I know it is necessary to raise fund through the public and all the people that do donate I am very proud of them and very much needed. But can you just Imagen if the following happened how much help it would be. If some of the fund from parking tickets went direct to cancer research we would not be so angry at getting one. All hospital parking revenue went direct to hospitals. All national lottery profit should go to hospitals and be spread out to make sure no department suffers there is to much money going into the private sector and not to were it is needed

  • Debs Linscott
    11 July 2010

    Every story above gets the thumbs up from me and I think you’re all incredible. How great to use real suffers and a huge well done to them for being so brave. I vote for the ad which brings in the most money (with or without music)…! The one thing I do know is we’re all sooooo united in our quest to be rid of this terrible desease forever (but definitely not rid of the gene carriers..!)

  • Jennie George
    11 July 2010

    I had breast cancer seven years ago, just had a mammogram which shows no abnormality at present – just thankful the diagnosis and treatment was so amazing – here in Cornwall we have the Mermaid Centre for breast cancer which is totally amazing. This advert is so powerful and straight to the point, made me very emotional. I am now treasurer of the local CRUK committee and work vehemently to raise funds. No music needs to be added to this mighty advert. Well done CRUK

  • Angela Diaz- Wiggins
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert gets straight to the point!It does not need music to help convey it’s message. I agree with a previous comment that a bit more focus on awareness and prompting people to go to their GP would have been a good idea to promote.Especially if they think they have a lump or some thing has changed like a mole, instead of just thinking it’s nothing or I’m embarrassed this can lead to it’s too late!

  • gloria solomon
    11 July 2010

    It says it all,it doesn’t need music,its fine as it is

  • Michele Rickard
    11 July 2010

    This is an excellent advert very moving, I have lost many relatives and friends to this dreadful disease and seen many survive it, I felt it was particularly poignant personally as my father in law was diagnosed with bowel cancer on Friday. Personally music always gets me, but maybe the silence is more startling for many people.

  • Kath Miles
    11 July 2010

    I have just walked the 5K at Newcastle, It was ironic as i was told on friday” we think its come back” do not put music with the advert, leave it as it is.

  • Lauren
    11 July 2010

    As powerful and touching as it is- and believe me, it is- there is nothing to say what the £2 a month is going towards… obviously its ‘cancer research’ but i would feel like my £2 wouldnt do much personally, so if it had details and stats on the individuals difference in relation to donations I think it might be more effective. Also, the mans voice at the end interuptiong the woman was a bit odd…like the man says the money bit and the woman says the slushy bit… unnecessary. Those points aside.. touching.

  • Michelle dyer
    11 July 2010

    Great advert but agree it needs music – perhaps something clasical in the background like Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini – very moving music to a very moving ad. Great work though guys keep it up!

  • Lauren
    11 July 2010

    As powerful and touching as it is- and believe me, it is- there is nothing to say what the £2 a month is going towards… obviously its ‘cancer research’ but i would feel like my £2 would do much personally, so if it had details and stats on the individuals difference in relation to donations I think it might be more effective. Also, the mans voice at the end interuptiong the woman was a bit odd…like the man says the money bit and the woman says the slushy bit… unnecessary. Those points aside.. touching.

  • Moira Clark
    11 July 2010

    I agree using real people is good. Because it can happen to any of us. I have lost three of my family with cancer in as many years. I hope that moore people will donate. I dont think it needs music.

  • Sherrie
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert hits home as it is. It catches your attention without any need for music. The fact that actors are not used drives home the reality of cancer & reminds us it can strike at any age, race or creed. Keep up the good work & hopefully one day it’ll be a thing of the past.

  • elizabeth
    11 July 2010

    The advert I found was short but it tells u straight about what u do for the patient and how it can either bring them and there family joy or pain x

  • Julie Baker
    11 July 2010

    Great ad, lets hope its gets more people donating, I am a monthly donator, a Race for Lifer every year and unfortunately know too many people affected by this terrible disease and I think using really people works better and no music

  • Natalie Banton
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert works well with just the way it is, adding music would detract from the spoken words which I think with the video footage is the important element in this advert. The fact that actors haven’t been used is great and it hits home more with actual survivers and doctors – you can connect better that way. Very well done, and yes keep up the good work.

  • Ian Birch
    11 July 2010

    I think the rapid flicking between the doctors during teh fist section is distracting. Suggest longer for each one – perhaps a full sentence? Otherwise, not bad – the emotions come through strongly.

  • Joanna King
    11 July 2010

    Think the advert is brilliant – maybe at the beginning have a notice stating “what you are about to see are real people not actors”
    The ending sent a shiver up my back – it has an impact. Well done Cancer Research!
    I am running the 10k Blemheim Palace with three other family members in September to help your cause which I am completely committed to, between us we wish to raise up to £1000.
    Together we will beat this!!!!

  • Jill Fance
    11 July 2010

    Already a monthy donater, Very good advert, just hope government lets us have the treatment if we get Cancer. Hope a lot more people will donate.

  • Beth Davies
    11 July 2010

    I think this advert is better than the previous ones.. Using REAL people, with REAL emotion! :)
    I see some people have said you should add music to the advert.. I really hope that you do not do this..It makes it more like emotional blackmail by putting a very sad song with it. What you have done this time, is show the real side of it, and you’ve done it straight to the point!

    Music will take away the impact the advert has on you.. Then instead of hearing, and taking in the message you’re trying to spread to everyone, the music will just take the attention away, and people will just end up singing along to the music, completely forgetting the point of the advert.

    It would be good to have an advert about Ovarian cancer, as it’s often called “The silent killer” there are no lumps etc to just randomly feel..
    Im now 25, but at the age of 14, I was diagnosed with Ovarian cancer, it was stage 3 by the time it was diagnosed, and I had major surgery, and months of horrible chemo, and have had 4 big operations since.. It would be really nice to see some adverts raising awareness about that for a change, as it seems to take a back seat compared to breast cancer.

    Well done on this advert, and thankyou very much for all you do :) Much love x

  • Andree Rodriguez
    11 July 2010

    Very true to life, in my humble opinion and experience. I have many friends who have been in both situations. The emotional pain is hard for all of us whose lives are touched by their suffering. Thank God for the power of prayer.

  • sharon leyland
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert says it all. Having lost my dad and my nan and now having a dear friend going through chemo I know the importance of the work thats done. I think that by using real people will hit home far more than any actors or indeed music in the ad. If this gets just 1% of the population to donate then it will have worked x

  • Sophie Carran
    11 July 2010

    Great to see, hope it gets a great reaction. Keep up the good work!

  • Jacqui Lynch
    11 July 2010

    For me it triggered emotions i thought i had dealt with. Anyone who watches such a poignant advert and does not donate cannot truly have a heart. Thank you for all you do x

  • Carole Connolly
    11 July 2010

    I watched this clip and at the end reacted with the emotions i so very often do when i remember. Leave it alone, no additional music is needed as the spoken word is a clear message. It is clear and simple which is enough as cancer is very often not.

  • Alan
    11 July 2010

    I think you should put a “if this e-mail has caused distress it was unintentional, and we apologise” at the end of your e-mail.

    Carol’s widower

  • hazel fisher
    11 July 2010

    Ihave lost two husband to Cancer so it certainly has changed my life .I no the heartache it can bring to families I have donated to cancer for thirty years and will continue to do so as its the only way we will beat this dease that can bring such pain and heartbrake .I thing its good to make people aware in there own homes and hopefully it will motivate them to help in the fight to beat Cancer good luck to all who are fighting this dreadful dease

  • Sharon R
    11 July 2010

    powerful message – it works for me

  • Tracy steel
    11 July 2010

    Great new advert but I still prefer the one with the little boy in putting on his scarf and with fields of gold playing in background

  • Mrs Karen Penn
    11 July 2010

    I think this is a billiant idea as this will put the message out to people and hopefully people will help towards a good course,as i went through Breast Cancer last year, and hopefully with all the help and funds more people and families can be helped in a horrible time.

  • Samantha
    11 July 2010

    The sentiment and words come across well. You also have a widespread of ages, genders and ethnicities to reflect the fact that cancer is non-discriminatory. However, I would have preferred to see fewer people speaking longer sentences. As it stands, I found it a bit fragmented.

  • Heather Robinson
    11 July 2010

    My daughter Anna is the little girl featured in the advert. She has battled leukaemia and beaten it and I am extraordinarily proud of what a beautiful and brave young girl she is. She was diagnosed aged 3 and has spent over half her life fighting and recovering from leukaemia. I am sorry if this advert upsets some people who are currently dealing with cancer, but isn’t it more important to advertise and raise money so that other people don’t suffer or die from this awful disease? I know that real life is sometimes difficult and being faced with difficult issues is upsetting, but please don’t detract from the good work that CRUK do. Also to everybody who is currently fighting cancer, I wish you all the best and hope that through research and the excellent care of the doctors, you will recover.

  • Deirdre
    11 July 2010

    Excellent ad. My Mother died of bowel cancer at 38, many years ago. Of 4 sisters one is still well after bowel cancer circa 14 years on, the other very well in remission with unilateral breast cancer circa 12 years.
    I think there should be a bigger drive to educate people about skin cancer. I cannot believe, in this heatwave, the number of infants and young children I’m seeing every time I go up my High Street, with no hats, babies with no shades on their push chairs, and only 2days ago a blond, fair skinned infant positively cooking in his chair whilst Dad chatted to 4 men friends. I’m still cross with myself for not having had the courage to speak to the Father. I have often spoken as tactfully as possible, some will respond & produce a hat or covering, but I’ve also been told “she/he doesn’t burn”! Keep up the good work.

  • Barbara Lomas
    11 July 2010

    I lost my brother to cancer and two very dear friends. These type of adverts are very thought provoking and are needed to remind people that, although great progress has been made, the fight goes on. Very moving.

  • Zane
    11 July 2010

    Very good. Effective and straight to the point. I don’t think it needs music I may just retract from the point.

  • Gloria Stoll
    11 July 2010

    This advert really works, it hit me hard and the tears started to fall even before they mentioned those dreaded words “its come back”. We need to be positive and fight togther to make it possible to research and research until we have eradicated this nightmare disease.

  • Gina Sumner
    11 July 2010

    I also do not feel that music would add anything to the advert.

    I’m surviving cancer 4 times, 2 x breast, cervical and a pheochromocytoma. I have the bcra 2 gene and my mum and her 4 sisters died very young as they all had the gene.

    I feel for Susan who posted much further up the page and think that maybe showing the logo would be a good idea for those people who feel the same way but can see that it might detract from the hard hitting message a tiny bit. Wish I could give Susan a hug right now, her post also brought a tear to my eye along with the advert.

    For your next campaign I feel strongly that an inclusion of the Relay for Life should be included as not only is this a majorily inclusive way of raising awareness in the community it is also a time to honour those who have gone too soon because of cancer and to celebrate those who are surviving.

  • ROSIE BENT
    11 July 2010

    I really liked the advert as it made you think. I will definately subscribe to this and will get my husband to do it too. Everyone who has a bank account should be made to do it.
    I spend many hours trying to raise money & awareness of this dreadful disease. My mother died from it.
    I run a charity shop & managed to persuade most of my volunteers to donate their time to take part in a calendar girls style calendar.

  • Fiona
    11 July 2010

    simple and brilliant.

  • taxos
    11 July 2010

    An important message , very well expressed. Add nothing take nothing away

  • maggie
    11 July 2010

    I definitely dont thiunk music is needed- to me this o would detract from a serious message that is likely to involve us all at some point in life. Good that real people took part too.
    My partner had major surgery for bowel cancer last year plus chemo- and so far is doing well.
    I think even at the darkest times when the future was unknown, I could have coped seeing this ad, but we are all different so only my opinion….

  • christine whitehead
    11 July 2010

    over the rainbow should be played in the background i think, but well done to the indian lady i really felt it with her and my stomach went over with her, i think the different doctors conversations should of been all their conversation and not bits of it going in and out though but well done and i hope it grabs peoples attention x

  • jayde watmough
    11 July 2010

    hi,
    i think that this advert is great but maybe you could do with some must somewhere?

  • Gordon Donaldson
    11 July 2010

    A good advert, but lacking oomph, this disease will touch the majority of us in our lifetime. People will help if they realise what you achieve with your research and how it can help them personally.
    Sometimes we need things to be made very obvious to get us to take action, and lets face it a couple of pounds a month isnt a great commitment, but the pride of being part of it is huge.

  • Meghhan
    11 July 2010

    I this this advert is very touching but there needs to be something that grabs the attentions of the audience at the beginning, But i feel it is very clever to have many different people from different experiences ank backgrounds have their say, and it is a very powerful advert, the only change would be to have something grab the audience! x

  • Eddie Newnham
    11 July 2010

    Good but agree with the previous comment , a bit fragmented.

  • Suzanne Wallace
    11 July 2010

    It’s a powerful message. It’s not a John Lewis advert, and the tough messages in life don’t come with music.

    Telling me about the importance of fund raising is preaching to the chior. But this is going to command a lot of attention and chanel a lot of emotion. I hope it raises a lot of money, and effects a lifetime of effective treatments.

    Good luck.

  • Elaine Day
    11 July 2010

    As a survivor of breast cancer I am so happy to be fine but I still fear, the day when they may say, ‘Sorry, it has come back’. Every pound donated moves the odds into my favour! Excellent advert just as it is. The truth and nothing but the truth so send in the cash!!!!!!!

  • Charles Lacaille
    11 July 2010

    A good challenging advert, perhaps a bit fragmented because of the constant change of voice.

  • Val M
    11 July 2010

    I like the the cnadid approach which has kept your message real and factual. No music required in my opinion as I feel music would possibly impact on the first impression and thoughts as music would invoke personal memories depending on emotion and experience.Not necessary providing first emotional response to your campaign which is what you will achieve without music.

  • Malia
    11 July 2010

    I have to admit I am very very scared of this ailment more than any other. It took my grandmother from me at a very impressionable age. No matter what we do to erase it we can never do enough till this disease is wiped off the face of the planet. I am grateful to Cancer reasearch uk who i consider our frontline defence against the terrible disease. More should be done to spread awareness of lesser known cancers and for motivating people to get themselves regularly checked. Knowledge is our only hope.

  • David Grant
    11 July 2010

    Yes together we will beat Cancer but as someone that was given 12 -15 months in August 2005 for a cancerous brain tumour (Glioma Grade 4), could I make a plea for more research into brain tumours. I’m working 5 days a week and telling people to believe in themselves but some extra priority would help! It depressing to see the press hail yet another breathrough in Cancer research only to find the list of cancers this breakthrough applies to stop at chin level.

  • Erica
    11 July 2010

    I am pleased that you are raising awareness with this commericial.
    However, I have a major concern that I have raised time and time with your press office, to no avail.

    WHEN, OH WHEN will you realise that if you were to create a special area of funding, that guarantees that you will not use animal testing you will be able to significantly increase donations?

    Several members of my family have beaten cancer, and we are all very grateful to everyone involved. But so many people will not support me in fundraising because you will NOT EARMARK A SECTION OF FUNDING that guarantees not to USE ANIMAL TESTING.
    I have heard endless press officers and marketing managers fudging the answer with: “well we do a lot of work that doesn’t involved animals.” Yes. But until you created a dedicated fund you will not attract donations from people who are opposed to animal testing. They cannot know what their money is used for and they WILL NOT DONATE under these circumstances. It’s not rocket science. It would be so easy to do. Come on! You’re missing a major opporunity here. JUST DO IT!

  • Sheila Kenwright
    11 July 2010

    Excellent advert it was straight to the point and I do think people take notice of what is being said by the patients, survivors and doctors. Music not necessary. It makes me feel proud that I have helped in some small way by taking part in The Race for Life. Look forward to seeing it on the television.

  • Claire
    11 July 2010

    Jilly, as one of the survivors in the advert, I can reassure you that we are not actors. The advert will be accompanied with our stories on the website, so look out for those.

  • Tully
    11 July 2010

    A thought provoking advert, sadly the disease will affect most who watch it in one way or another as many of us have had dealings with the ‘big C’. I feel honesty is the best way… ANYTHING being done to raise peoples awareness and prompt people to donate/take part in fundraising schemes like the Walk for Life, is surely a positive step forward. x

  • Tully
    11 July 2010

    A thought provoking advert, sadly the disease will affect most who watch it in one way or another as many of us have had dealings with the ‘big C’. I feel honesty is the best way to… ANYTHING being done to raise peoples awareness and prompt people to donate/take part in fundraising schemes like the Walk for Life, is surely a positive step forward. x

  • marlene fells
    11 July 2010

    This advert is very good.I am a breast cancer survivor and it gives all the facts…BUT best of all no actors

  • Christine Greaves
    11 July 2010

    Great advert – very moving. NoI don’t think it needs any music it says it all on its own!

    Post 2 years Breast Cancer :)

  • susan richards
    11 July 2010

    Thankyou for letting me see the new advertisement, precise to the point and very touching.
    I personally would like to see music added, there are a lot of people who are touched by music, it can speak volumes where words don’t.
    I myself was diagnosed with cancer in 2008 as was my twin sister who died on Christmas day that same year, we were always touched by music and the lyrics of songs…………….

  • Jilly Black
    11 July 2010

    the advert is quite effective but I don’t like the fact it skips so quickly from one person to another; it loses a bit of meaningfulness that way, especially for some reason moving so quickly from the words of the medical people-the surgeon in particular. It would be nice also-somehow-to know that these are real people and not actors in the advert. I think it would give it more clout if so. I hope the campaign is successful…

  • Caroline Thompson
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert is direct and makes a valid point .I lost members of my family and had breast cancer in 2002 so cancer is always in the back of my mind the feelings of fear never leave and people need to be aware it can happen to anyone young and old.I am lucky I was diagnosed early more pubicity should be around for others like ovarian.

  • Leon Kamalanathan
    11 July 2010

    The advert tells it how it is and the fact that these are all real patients, survivors, doctors and researchers is brilliant, in my opinion.

  • Farha Ahmad
    11 July 2010

    I was very impressed and touched with the advert. Its fantastic to show the different ethnic mix of people and children. The advert has taken into account a great deal of thought, showing how ones life is affected with cancer. The advert is fantastic wihout any music.

  • Angie Bancroft
    11 July 2010

    I thought it was very precise and to the point, i think putting music with it may draw the attention away from what is being said. I also think it would be a good idea to treat the camera as one of the patients, so that you feel the severity of the situation. We’ve all known friends and family with cancer that have lost their battle so it is important to get the message across.I hope this makes more people aware good luck xx

  • Caroline Wilson
    11 July 2010

    A simple and effective advert. The use of real people is very important. I hope it helps to raise much more money for this fabulous cause.

  • Lynne Davies
    11 July 2010

    What a moving and motivating ad. I hope as many people as possibe will give towards your amazing research. I d agree with a previous comment, why not start a £1 a week campaign across everyone who is still employed in the country? Thousands would sign up I’m sure. Great ad, music is not that important, keep up the amazing work!

  • Ann
    11 July 2010

    Brilliant, will commit to monthly payment. Very moving

  • Janice
    11 July 2010

    Quite boring. Will probably not ‘grab’ the viewers attention. I would have preferred it backward with the bad news lady first. People love misery so are more likely either out of compassion for her to see what is wrong or just human desire to watch from a distance watch the whole thing – at least once to get the ‘story line’. The advert for the childhood cancer where the boy is in school and everyone ‘seems’ to be looking at him then we have a ‘Dead Poet Society’ moment at the end is one of the very few ads I have seen which I consider interest grabbing and I can remember. I should say I live with cancer and work at a cancer charity where every day I meet people on their personal journies. We really do laugh an awful lot not because it’s funny but because we are all alive and living for whatever time we may have.

  • Lisa
    11 July 2010

    …Having read most of the replies,particulary the ones who suggest we must donate to help this cause,I wonder how many of us have actually “actioned” our thoughts to help this campain…just a passing thought!

  • Nicky Southern
    11 July 2010

    I think it is very hard hitting and to the point. Having lost my mum to cancer and having seen both sides of the story that treatment is working and then that there is nothing else that can be done makes adverts like this hit a real nerve, leaving a tear in the eye but a smile at the memories of the person taken away. Keep up the good work and leave the advert as it is, music would spoil it.

  • Lisa
    11 July 2010

    Wow! Fantastic advert. I’m post 2yrs diagnosed breast cancer, lost my dad to it 6months before that and then had my twin sister diagnosed 6months after me. I do find these adverts upsetting, as it relives all the emotions that come with being told “you have cancer”. However, without all the donations, raising awareness campains, research and training, patients like me and many many others, would not be here! Keep up the excellent work Cancer Research and keep donating as you never know if you/or someone close to you needs their expertise.

  • Harry Meikle
    11 July 2010

    (Only kidding) In spite of our deep sadness in our own personal grief , we mustn’t forget to smile.

  • Harry Meikle
    11 July 2010

    I think that the advert — as I have seen it in this email — is good and effective. However, no matter how keen one might be to support your campaign, I think it’s too much of a sacrifice if you expect us , the public, to have to watch Coronation Street before we can see the full effect !!! Wow ! That’s real cruelty.

  • Gill Woodford
    11 July 2010

    The fact that you have used real patients and doctors is more meaningful, and I hope this is obvious to those who view it. This has to a be hard hitting campaign; one cannot pussyfoot around cancer.

  • Carol Henry
    11 July 2010

    so depressing , where is the hope with this message. We know it may return but to use that to force more money from people I am not happy about . Perhaps if we spread more good news stories people surving people would be less afraid to go to the doctor early , I am 11 years after bowel cancer , and have often felt guilty for surviving as there is not support after the last offical check up.

  • David
    11 July 2010

    Music would detract from the impact of the advert, and the effective emotional tactics designed to open people’s wallets. The medical people and hospital settings used are an accurate reflection of the way cancer research is driven by doctors, surgeons and drug companies. Cut it out or poison it out is the approach and what a pity there is all that collateral damage to adjacent healthy cells by these actions, as well as the probability that cancer cells that survive chemo-therapy come back even stronger, like pesticide resistant weeds. When is some research effort going to be put into studies on diet, lifestyle and attitudes that lead to cancer and can maintain its growth if not changed? I have read so much on this since being diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer (too late to operate) 2 years ago. Doctors and consultants I have raised this with always say there is no scientific evidence to back up such claims for alternative approaches, whereas there have been many drug trials. This is because there is no profit for drug companies in such non-clinical studies. Sorry if I sound cynical.

  • Helen
    11 July 2010

    I will like to see more of these adverts. More awareness is required about cancer and the illness,to get more people raising and donating money. My mum was diagnosed at Chrismas and in March she got one of the side affects from being a cancer patient and died from a blood clot. Its time we beat cancer FULL STOP.

  • Edna
    11 July 2010

    Great to the point! No music needed. By the way I’m two years post cancer treatment – keep up the good work!

  • Jennifer Marsh
    11 July 2010

    Good advert, but it does bring back the pain of losing someone who was allowed to come home and die

  • Cath
    11 July 2010

    Great advert, very thought provoking but tinged with sadness. Many people are still dying of this dreadful disease but equally there are success stories too. We all need to do what we can by supporting Cancer Research. Showing this ad in peak viewing times will, hopefully, really hit home although I have every sympathy for those who have lost a dear one as this will bring painful memories back. By the way, no music needed.

  • Neil Crump
    11 July 2010

    Personally I think that this is an excellent campaign – the message is spot on and hits the appropriate level of emotion. It is also great to hear the healthcare professionals voice – a perspective rarely seen in this type of campaign. It also acknowledges that more has to be done and is needed from us. It has a clear call to action – a small donation each month that could make a massive difference.

    I have embedded the video on my blog and encouraged my readers to follow Cancer Research UK on Twitter (@CR_UK) and to subscribe to your YouTube channel.

    Keep up the great work and I hope that you raise lots of funds with this campaign.

    @aurorahealthpr ^NC

  • Colin
    11 July 2010

    At last an advert exactly to the point. As a patient myself you do not need hairy fairy stories with music, just to the point. Well done!!

  • Sally
    11 July 2010

    Spot on. I will never forget the moment when was told I had cancer and I got that sense again from the advert. A lot of people seem to think that cancer can be cured and that the end of your cancer treatment is the end of your cancer journey. The public need to know the harsh reality of cancer and the ending of the advert illustrates very clearly the fear that is always at the back of your mind, no matter how well you are doing at the moment. The mythical “all clear” that everyone thinks you have been given is in fact just “no evidence of disease”.

  • Neil H
    11 July 2010

    Apologies in advance.

    It needs something, – maybe it IS music. I could lie, and say it ‘hit the spot’, or say it is ‘powerful’ or even ‘thought-provoking’. It is none of those things. The only bit that stood out was the ‘Oh God’, which felt incongruous, scripted and ‘phoney’.

    The film left me feeling detached, and no more concerned than before I had seen it. What was the idea behind it?

    Those of us directly affected by cancer will understand something from it, something related to, and stimulating our own unique experiences and memories; we come to it ‘ready’: – but to those who have no immediate experience of the B*stard Cancer it is just a collage of talking heads, and it is those people that the campaign needs to reach.

    So sorry to be blunt, but Cancer takes no prisoners, and neither will I. I want to see cancer hit hard, I want it to suffer. I want to see it wiped out.

    The RSPCA can just show a cuddly kitten or a mistreated dog and be guaranteed some response. We need to be cleverer than that, and that means being producing something a lot cleverer than what is shown here.

  • helen thomas
    11 July 2010

    I think it’s power is in not having music. When someone is sat opposite a doctor hearing those words, there isn’t music in the background. Silence makes it feel real and the viewer can more easily walk in the shoes of the patient.

  • maureen
    11 July 2010

    i like the new advert it hits the point

  • Abiolar
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert is excellent and very straight to the point too. Using real people who have been there makes it very moving. Making a donation is the only way more awareness can be created, new treatments found and more ‘it’s gone’ heard. Well done Cancer Research and together we will beat cancer.

  • glenys pugh
    11 July 2010

    i think no matter what is put in an advert it will get to someone somewhere and until you have had the problem yourself you do not realise the implications of such a happening when the realisation takes place and eventually you have a good outcome from it you are much more willing to involve yourself to get other people aware of what can be done with lots of support fom a lot of people and when this happens a lot more people will be able to live a normal life again because that at the end is all you want to do
    my heart goes out to the people who have not been as lucky as i have been and life is very precious to everyone glen pugh

  • Nicole
    11 July 2010

    I think an opening logo is a good idea. I am a breast cancer survivor and I can’t bear to see reminders of cancer on the telly – it just reminds me about all the horrific chemo, radiotherapy and operations I went through. However, as much as it disturbs me to watch, it’s realism, I hope, will encourage others into donating.

  • Hazel
    11 July 2010

    Having lost family members to this awful disease and having a special friend who battled it, and so far seems to have won, I feel, as someone else remarked, that seeing this advert in the middle of Coronation Street could be upsetting. I am thinking of my friend who recently lost her husband to cancer and watches Coronation Street. However, it is right that this is brought to people’s attention and TV would seem to be the best medium, as well as the cinema. As for music, definitely not – it’s not some schmaltzy advert for chocolate or the like – this is far too serious an issue for music. I wish I could do more for Cancer Research but as a pensioner, my funds are limited but I guess everyone could do as I do and put pennies, 2p pieces and those awful 5p pieces into a jar – you don’t miss it and it can mount up into a reasonable sum. I always take the money out with me when shopping and then I can just empty the money into the collecting tin as Cancer Research is something I always support when I can. If overpaid entertainers and footballers donated just a fraction of their wages, I am sure it would be an enormous help. Apologies to the ones that do.

  • Vicky
    11 July 2010

    It’s “ok” but honestly it just is not strong enough. I never realised how much cancer and it’s ripples affect people until mum was diagnosed with lung cancer. They operated and said it had gone, 9 months later it was back and terminal. They told her black and white as it was. You show one woman at the end who has no good news yet showed three people I think whose news was good. I am sure the ratio with bad news is much higher, a more honest approach is needed to give people out there a reality check that this cancer could just be round the corner. It should not be threatening but realistic enough to shock people that funding is essential if this awful disease is ever to be cured. I never realised just how bad it was until it slapped me hard in the face, taking the soft approach will not have the effect that is needed. The producers need to look at the drink driver campaigns, I know it’s different but it’s reality hard and cold, in your face, a wake up call and that is what is needed. I’m imploding with all the grief this disease is causing and so are all my family, perhaps one day, perhaps, less people will be going through it!

  • Margaret Baillie
    11 July 2010

    Excellent advert, straight and to the point.

  • Lyn
    11 July 2010

    Excellant that no actors were used for a very hard hitting and honest advert. I agree that using music can have a postive impact – think of all the adverts we remember due to the tunes, which will not take away the importance of cancer research, infact will only enhance it. Keep up the good work

  • Abiola Adefeko
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert is excellent and very straight to the point too. If everyone could support Cancer Research by making a donation, it would go a long way in creating awareness and finding the right treatments and there will be more ‘it’s gone’. The fact that it can happen to anyone makes it really scary. Well done Cancer Research and together we will beat cancer.

  • Natalie
    11 July 2010

    I think the absence of music will make it stand out more from the other advertisements. Although music can make the adverts memorable, they can also make them blur into one. Having one such as this will be effective, I feel, in gaining people’s attention and hopefully raising their awareness to such a serious matter. The cancer research campaigns are unique in that they are not afraid to use real life patients and medical staff which makes the appeals so much more real.
    I hope that this catches the hearts of the nation and raises peoples awareness. My thoughts are with the family, friends, patients and all other people involved in this fight against cancer. Be strong and together we will find a way to beat this. x

  • Marj
    11 July 2010

    It says what everyone hopes they wull never hear but in reality cancer does not discriminate and the message is very clear. I think the advert will make more people think long and hard about their lifestyles and it may encourage those who care to donate a little cash too.

  • christine
    11 July 2010

    I think the new advert is good its more on the positive side than the pesimistic but does say that not all cancers are curable. With the money each month it will allow far more research which is marvelous. I was treated on a drugs trial and my outcome was brilliant I just want to support more that others can benefit too.
    Thjank you

  • Lesley Read
    11 July 2010

    straight and to the point, but still thought provoking and direct. I think it will catch peoples attention and hopefully encourage them to think about donating.

  • Kim Culley
    11 July 2010

    I think that the advert is true to its word and hasn’t used actors in it. Using people that have got or had cancer really tells the story that they need our help and money to carry on with the research to help them battle cancer.
    It is an excellent advert, but a little music is needed just to make people realise how important the work that Cancer Research do, really help lives.

  • sue
    11 July 2010

    As someone diagnosed with breast cancer and undergoing chemo this advert really say’s it all.There is no easy way of breaking this news but the Doctor’s and nurses manage to do it right. This advert hit’s all the right button’s and hopefully people will donate more to carry on the vital work needed.

  • Andy
    11 July 2010

    Excellent. Shows that cancer can soemtimes be beaten, but not always. Of course some people will be upset, but others need to come to terms with it. I’m not being flippant: I have cancer.

  • Maureen Jenner
    11 July 2010

    A straightforward message delivered with sincerity is more likely to succeed than superfluous hype. Keep it simple. Nothing to cloy and annoy. This is advertising at its best.

  • Sarah L
    11 July 2010

    I think this is an excellent advert. Just the right balance between hope and stark reality. However I cried when I read the post from Susan, the lady who lost her husband and whom these types of ads upset. I think it would be a good idea to put your logo at the beginning of the ad as a warning. I lost my mum 4 years ago and I still have days when I just can’t face any reminder of the awful things that happened to her.

  • Pat
    11 July 2010

    Good advert. Do have some concerns that it seems to imply that the return of cancer is final and irrevocable, whereas in fact many people go on fighting after more than one instance, and many continue receiving palliative treatment even after being diagnosed as terminal. The fact that the final patient has no voice is partly responsible for this. Someone whose cancer has returned might be badly affected by this.20seconds wasted- we all know it’s hard for doctors to tell someone they have cancer.More people talking about their treatment in the next one please.

  • Sarah L
    11 July 2010

    I think this is an excellent advert. I found it deeply moving with just the right balance between hope and stark reality. However I cried when I read Susan’s post, the lady who lost her husband aged 46 and whom these type of adverts upset deeply. I think it would be a good idea to show your logo at the beginning of the advert. I lost my mum 4 years ago and I still have days when I can’t face any reminder of one of the awful things that happened to her.

  • annette smith
    11 July 2010

    your adverts always hit the spot i also have been in the two places heard the bad news and gone home to tell my children (who were all young) and watched them smile as time goes by and treatments, first frighten them then they see along with me the results they were looking for .There’s no need for music or actors just people who have been touched by the big C to show and show again there is light and lots of us will find it some will not but cancer research fights to make that list smaller with every donation

  • Lynne
    11 July 2010

    The advert is right to the point. No music needed, it’s powerful enough on it’s own.

  • jacqueline
    11 July 2010

    the advert is great it is what it is powerful and to the point.and shows the work from cancer research !
    music would spoil and take away from what is trying to be put accross.keep up the good work cancer research and all the supporters (together yes we will beat cancer)
    love and respect jacqueline

  • Sue
    11 July 2010

    Powerful everything needs to be said is plain honest truth of cancer

  • valerie
    11 July 2010

    I think the advert is spot on It it captures the mood perfectly how the professionals feel and the patients too. We need to keep sending out the message that more support is needed to keep up the great work Cancer Research is doing. They helped save me and many others and no matter what happens in the future I have seen my first Grandchild thanks to their work. Long may they continue.

  • Debbie
    11 July 2010

    A very powerful and thought provoking advert. No need to add anything. The sad thing is that people need to be reminded about contribution and even more sad that this is vital research funded by a charity!

  • Alison Prentice
    11 July 2010

    Simple yet powerful. As a survivor this will bring a tear to my eye each time I see it but the message is real and clear. The advert doesnt need music -the people speak for themselves. At some point in everyones life we all know of someone who has been touched by cancer & this advert strikes home. Keep up the good work.

  • tracy hartshorn
    11 July 2010

    great ad…please dont add music to it ,its spot on!!

  • Patsi
    11 July 2010

    Really powerful, direct and gets the message across about there being more to be done.

  • Gemma Blackman
    11 July 2010

    For such a short advert it really hits home very quickly. In 40 seconds it managed to make me remember when my aunt told the family she was going to die, and that makes me very emotional. No music needed, definitely powerful enough.

  • Vivien Scane
    11 July 2010

    I think it’s direct and to the point. It’s not emotional, just factual, which is good. I don’t think music would help at all, that would make it too ‘acted’ rather than real life, and this is how we need to portray cancer, as something that happens to ‘us’ and not something just acted out on television. It’s good that they are actual sufferes and not actors, hopefully this will encourage more folkes to give, just a little each month

  • andrea merchant
    11 July 2010

    good advert, no music needed. spot on. my husband died from cancer last year and people need to be reminded to give money to such an important charity. cancer research is fantastic!

  • Sandra
    11 July 2010

    Excellent advert.

  • Claire Eldridge
    11 July 2010

    I think it is very good as it is. Short and to the point. Just the right amount of pauses to allow your thought and emotions to take it all in.
    Everyone knows someone who has won, still fighting or lost their battle with cancer so it’s something that affects us all. It’s good to remind us all.
    My Dad has survived Cancer 3 times and received various types of treatments. It may have returned as we are awaiting results. It’s good to highlight that it can come back, which is why continued funding is needed to find and develope new treatments.
    Keep up the good work.

  • Mike Fleckney
    11 July 2010

    This is an extremely good advert, direct, touching with the right balance between optimism and the stark reality for some. Very good emphaisis on the challenging work to be done.

    Excellent.

  • Ruth rRbinson
    11 July 2010

    Having just watched the preview for the Advert for Cancer Research, it was, as many others have said, very much TO THE POINT. I too lost my husband aged 46, and also my Mum, (both with non-related smoking lung cancer and neither of them had NEVER directly smoked,(only passively)), within 3 weeks of each other. That really hurts. My husband had 2 series of Chemo after a fight to get a second opinion in the first place, the first shrunk the tumour and he was in remission for about 4 – 6 months then “it” returned, this time with avengeance, so had a second course of treatment, though this time a different regime but unfortunately it didnt have the desired effect and I lost him in Jan 1998. I don’t think that any music can offer any solace either, it’s seeing the faces and the voices of the patients with this disease and also the Doctors who have to impart the news to the Families that hits the spot in no uncertain terms. I, like many others, have been there. Unless you’ve experienced the “pain” of this disease, either directly or indeed indirectly, you cannot understand what it’s like to live with.

  • michelle
    11 July 2010

    On the whole ok but maybe finish on a more possitive note we need your support to be able to deliver more good news to patients.

  • Gordon Downing
    11 July 2010

    I forgot to mention that your advert is “Spot On” and do not add music,
    Gordon Downing

  • Alex Kaye
    11 July 2010

    Every person that works in the UK should get a pound deducted from their pay every week. Belive me you will never miss it and you will feel wonderful knowing your saving lives, and remember one day it could be your own? Lets find a cure and please give what you can afford

  • Carly W
    11 July 2010

    I think, as always, your adverts deliver the message in a way that’s very real and straight to the point. Having been given the ‘you’ve got cancer’ bombshell myself in 2007 (age 28) and having to undergo surgery, chemotherapy, external and internal radiotherapy to then be told ‘the tumour has completely gone’ was just amazing beyond belief and really brought home to me that the doctors and nurses involved in my treatment had saved my life. But I also realised that without the invaluable work from Cancer Research, I wouldn’t have survived to watch my little boy grow up. I just hope I’ll never have to hear those devastating words ‘it’s come back’ !! I don’t think the advert needs music or anything else, just real people with real lives and real facts. The impact of cancer is massive, but not as big as the impact of Cancer Research raising awareness – a heartfelt enormous thank you to everyone who donates x

  • Mary Dawber
    11 July 2010

    Excellent advert, gets to the point and is very moving. It portrays the compassion and empathy felt by all those involved with cancer patients on a daily basis and the emotions of those being treated. The “it’s back” part really hits home. Hopefully lots of people will donate. I too feel that music isn’t necessary.

  • Nigel Auckland
    11 July 2010

    Great advert, it shows progress but also that more work is needed.

    There IS light at the end of the tunnel, but until we get out of that tunnel there is a need to pay to keep that light on.

  • Gordon Downing
    11 July 2010

    I rate myself one of the very lucky ones. I was diagnosed with large bowel cancer when I just turned 70, I am now turned 73 and hopefully still going strong. I had a colonostomy and have a stoma fitted which is no problem to me and I am thankful that you all do a wonderful job, God Bless you all.

    Gordon Downing

  • Avril Moller
    11 July 2010

    A strong advert, very well done. I am in the process of Chemo after breast cancer, but it still upset me… As when you are told you have cancer you feel no different, even after a mastectomy you feel like nothing is wrong. I think the chemo hits hardest. But you must always stay positive, I am lucky as i have had great Surgeon and support form the Breast ans Oncology team..Keep advertising making everyone aware of Cancer please…

  • Cath Hughes
    11 July 2010

    Brilliant.
    Just for the fact that it featuers people dealing with this every day . No music ,even more brilliant, makes it so much more powerful. I would defy anyone not to be moved by the lady at the close of the advert. Thank you for taking part,I am sure it will make people think.
    More of these type of adverts are needed where people’s health is concerned.Totally relate to it professionally as a nurse, and personally .
    Well done.

  • Fiona Andrews
    11 July 2010

    I thought the advert was to the point and very emotive. Having been in this situation with my husband who was diagnosed with lung cancer last year, it was very hard to take on board that he had only a few months to live. But hopefully with new treatments more people will survive. I don’t think music is necessary.

  • Susan
    11 July 2010

    I appreciate that you need to advertise but often feel people like me are forgotten.
    My husband died of cancer aged 46. It was traumatic and depressing and I do not want to be reminded of it as I sit down to relax.
    Adverts like this make me cry and stop me from sleeping as the horrendous times are relived.
    If there was an opening logo that allowed me, and I am sure thousands of others, time to switch off or get out of the room perhaps it would have a positive impact on the number of people taking anti-depressants or considering suicide.

  • Mike Kelly
    11 July 2010

    Excellent; to the point with a clear message.

  • John A Bromley
    11 July 2010

    To the point

  • Liz Bentley
    11 July 2010

    Excellent, in that it is most effective, being simple, direct and delivers the message straight to the point. The use of real doctors and patients, is much more heartfelt than actors.
    It “engages” with the viewer.
    No music needed.

  • Anita
    11 July 2010

    I would like to see something about raising awareness- maybe in a future advert. I have just lost a beloved friend/sister-in-law to ovarian cancer, and think awareness of some of the less common cancers needs to be given air time. Having said that, I think it is a very moving advert and does hit home – I am also one of the lucky ones being a breast cancer survivor myself and the success stories are important.

  • melanie slater
    11 July 2010

    i love the new advert.it is a subject close to my heart as my daughter kelsey had neuroblastoma aged 6mths old.so it is a very important campaign.kelsey also appears in one of you adverts to get people to donate money if u remember her xx keep up the good work

  • Joanne Williams
    11 July 2010

    This advert hits the spot! I have been in both places. My 26 yr old son was told the cancer had responded really well. All thanks to cancer research and the treatment he got meant his survival rate was so high. But then he got told the ‘it’s come back news’ and died 2 months later (April 2010). The ‘it’s come back news’ will be given to people less and less over the years with money from cancer research. The advert focusing on the good stories first I find works well as it helps people see cancer as something you can survive because of cancer research. It hits home then how much more money is needed so everyone can say ‘it’s gone’. I like the no music because the words hit home more then.

  • Sharron Ward
    11 July 2010

    Simple and to the point. The fact that real people not actors have been used makes it all the more poignant.

  • isobel morton
    11 July 2010

    i think it is a very emotive and moving advert and i hope it inspires pople to donate to cancer research.

  • Pauline Lewis
    11 July 2010

    I thought it was good in as much as it was direct and to the point. I really dont think any type of music would be appopriate in this type of campaign.

  • Ana Waissbein
    11 July 2010

    I think it is very good: simple, direct, extremely moving. I believe that adding music to it is totally superfluous. Please, leave it as it is.

  • Sue Martin
    11 July 2010

    Hi,

    I love the advert but it needs music – something to elevate the emotion behind such a serious topic. Something like the John Lewis ad with the sound track ‘Always a Woman’ it was the soundtrack that caught peoples imagination it had millions of hits on you tube and raised the profile of John Lewis enormously.

    I don’t know what song though for Cancer…maybe ‘Nothing compares to u’ Sinead O’Connor. I realise that a pop song might be viewed as ‘dumbing down’ such a serious message, but as someone who lost her mother aged 7 and who is carring the BRCA1 Cancer gene I feel well placed to make this suggestion.

    Kind Regards,

    Sue Martin

    Comments

  • Laura
    24 September 2010

    I personally do not like this advert. My mum was diagnosed 5 years ago now, and went through absolute hell, still going through injections and treatment now, i feel this advert is very harsh, especially ending the advert with basically ‘the cancer is back’ and that is it!

    I realise how much this charity does for people and have fully supported it and many others over the years. The main point of the advert is to shock people and make people aware, which is fantastic.

    However,the message that should be promoted should be mainly hope and how money that is raised can help people and maybe change peoples lives for the better. After watching that advert i felt even more worried and panicy about my mums future health than i already was.

    Most of the people i have spoken to about this, family and otherwise, agree with my view.

  • stephen cooke 22
    4 September 2010

    i agree with you sarah, its harsh but it needs to be to try and make people aware,… there is help for all patients and the partners of patients because it affects theire life aswell,

  • sarah harding 38
    3 September 2010

    The c word is horrible but people are diagnosed with it every day. I was with breast cancer at the age of 34, my life fell apart but if i wasn’t breast aware by seeing adverts i wouldn’t of reacted so soon. People need to know that any one can get cancer but by people supporting it we can all help each other. The advert is full of facts. Such as “your not on your own” “it can affect any one at any age” “there is support out there” “and that people all over the world help to find more treatments and cures”. its about us all coming together and the advert shows that. I get really upset when i see anything to do with cancer, but its life and needs to be shown. Sorry i’ve gone on a bit but its close to my heart as it is with thousands of other people.

  • stephen cooke 22
    26 August 2010

    i know how people can get upset at the advert but it has to make that impact to show you what its like for cancer patients like me, it is harsh and horrible but with the help of good people we can get through this alot easier, everytime i see something to do with cancer i get upset so i know how people dont like to see it on the tv. but it needs to be shown

  • stephen cooke 22
    26 August 2010

    I think this is a great advert it really hits home what it means, i had stomach cancer and im 22, i am greatfull,to the people who donate money..youre the people who saved my life, Cant thank you enough

  • Henry Scowcroft
    25 August 2010

    We’re very sorry to hear that people have been upset by our recent ad. As Carolan said in her comment on July 12, we try to be as sensitive as we can in our advertising and didn’t set out to make an ad that was upsetting, but rather one that showed the reality of cancer.

    Anyone going through cancer wants to have hope that there will be a way of treating their cancer successfully, and this is very much the case with Ann, the woman featured at the end of the ad, who has not in any way lost hope and who has received many positive comments following her involvement in the campaign.

    Hope, bravery and strength are key themes of the campaign and although Cancer Research UK has given hope to more people through being at the heart of the work that has seen survival rates double over the past forty years, the reality is that there is still much more to be done.

    Henry
    Cancer Research UK

  • Frances
    20 August 2010

    The ad starts out positively, showing the great advances that have been made in dealing with cancer and wonderful results achieved. However, as someone who has a loved-one going through this disease at the moment, please spare a thought for present patients. The ending isn’t positive and takes away hope, which is too much to lay on people who are bravely fighting this disease, especially those who have been told “It’s come back”. Please re-think the ending and alter it. It hits those you are trying to help too hard.

  • M J Clark
    20 August 2010

    I am behind your advert campaigns and agree that it is important to get a strong message across, but to me this advert is brutal and quite negative. My mum had breast cancer a few years ago. Her experience with treatment and prognosis were highly positive – a side which features occasionally in your adverts but should be far more prominent.

    Coming from a small family where cancer has unfortunately featured in our lives with my mum’s diagnosis, this advert takes us back to a place we don’t want to go. You are giving across a message that cancer never goes away, which implies that it’s won! My mum, although losing her hair, lead her life to the full throughout her treatment and didn’t get sick. Her routine was largely the same and she returned to work halfway through.

    I realise, unfortuantely, that this is not the case for so many others who have lost people through cancer or suffered it themselves. Many of these people are aware of the brutalities and the need for donations or awareness without this stark, uncompromising message from such a great foundation.

    Even people who have not been directly affected by cancer see it is a daunting, terrifying illness, and are aware of these facts. It is a cruel disease, everyone knows, so please don’t disturb viewers with this message. I see my mum visibly distressed by this advert when we would rather see the future as positive as much as it is, as you state, uncertain. As family, it makes us anxious. Even before my mother suffered from the disease I would have felt at a state of unease watching. I find it offputting. Far too little people know the stories of survival – why do we concentrate on the negative?

    Sorry to be so negative but stories of survival and triumph can be every bit as touching and effective in your campaign as laying the emotions on thick. As much as I know people who have passed away through this condition, I know an equal amount of people who have gone on for decades stronger than before. We need to raise THAT awareness. Thanks!

  • lesley phelps
    12 August 2010

    Having worked in oncology for over twenty years i agree it is hard hitting but i know of patients who have gone through hell and back with major major sugery, chemo and radiotherapy and don’t want to hear that it could all come back. Some patients haven’t got the strength to go thro it all again but would be nice if you could end on a positive note. Keep up the good work.

  • sharon jones
    7 August 2010

    At the end of the day, it really doesn`t matter what cancer you have, cancer is cancer whatever part of your body it chooses to infest. Lets find a cure whatever it takes. A cancer survivor.

  • david felton
    7 August 2010

    this ad realy hits hard to those with cancer there children are realy very upset by this ad only those who have cancer will realy understand what im saying how distresed the suferers are and there children when they see this ad. THE PROBLEM IS THAT THOSE WITHOUT CANCER DONT GET AFECTED LIKE THIS BY YOUR AD >PLEASE DONT TARGET CANCER SUFERERS >TRY AND TARGET THE WIDER POPULATION>thats why on here theres only cancer suferers talking about it .Your targetting the wrong people. Dave Felton

  • Chris
    3 August 2010

    The campaign is a disgrace!

    The business of fund raising for charities is a tough one and needs be run as such.

    However when a charity like Cancer Research UK takes a decision to raise funds at the expense of the very people it is trying to help, it has lost the plot. Remission is a cause for hope and these hopes should not be dashed by thoughtless ad men.

    Hope is a much stonger message than despair – particularly when you are in the middle of a fight against the disease.

    I have consistently contributed over the years but will not do so now. My support will go to other cancer charities that target specific conditions and have not let corporate desire replace compassion.

  • Heather Wilde
    2 August 2010

    Totally agree with Ali on the 23rd July. My 21yr old son was diagnosed with NHL last November. This morning heralded an important CT scan to see if he is still in remission and if he can return to his golf + college in the USA. He saw your thoughtless new ad last night and consequently had no sleep. Yes we realise that cancer can come back and yes money is important to research but you have disregarded the collateral damage that such a campaign can inflict. My family has poured thousands into Cancer Research over the years. My mother died of ovarian cancer, my best friend of breast cancer. Surely it is those that will be most affected by your current advertising campaign that have poured money into your organisation NOT those who HAVE NOT been affected. Show some sort of understanding of the plight of the hundreds who are most likely to be watching such a wretched advert at that time of night. You might argue that this is the reality but the reality is that your campaign destroys hope for the thousands who have just been given hope of remission

  • gail mc grenaghan
    1 August 2010

    thinks this is a really effective ad. think there may be another version though,think I saw one on tv recently with john hartson at the end, am I imagining this? Everyone has had some contact with cancer and this is made evident in the ad. It can affect anyone at any time there are no exceptions.

  • Derek
    31 July 2010

    I have recently been treated for cancer at the base of my tongue. I will ” celebrate ” one year next week since being told that treatment was successful.
    Your advert , which I saw for the first time tonight , has upset me greatly , the last thing I want to hear is, It’s come back . We all know this is a possiblity , but it’s not nice being reminded on the TV.

  • Paul
    29 July 2010

    I mean prostate, not prostrate! For some reason I always type it incorrectly …

  • Paul
    29 July 2010

    A good advert but why no mention of prostrate cancer, the most common cancer in men? If anything this advert, and other like it, really, really need to raise awareness of prostrate cancer. An opportunity missed.

  • Mr Leslie Walker
    29 July 2010

    I have just seen your email link to your TV add and agree in general to the comments made. But I feel that there is also the need for more awareness to know more about the symptoms especially for ovarian cancer.My wife died from this terrible illness in 2006. Distraught I tried to bring this to people by creating my WebSite that same year to appeal for support for Cancer Research UK by doing a charity cycle ride. I feel let down by the lack of knowledge about this illness by our GP!S. Hoping for a reply to my email address to perhaps form some sort of support and springboard in this line of attack. The following is a little from my “About me” page About 14 years ago my wife Kathleen had breast cancer and got over that all right, but unfortunately she died

    earlier this year with an ovarian cancer that came upon her like a thief in the night and took her life on 21st

    February 2006. She had been a little below par for sometime at first it seemed to start with a stubborn heavy

    cold that then left her with what appeared to be like catarrh symptoms that would just not clear up. She

    visited the doctors on and off for something to clear the catarrh, nothing seemed to work and clear it. There

    were other slight changes that had happened at different stages she complained of backache for awhile, her

    likes and dislikes in food were changing . Some types of salad such as cucumber would upset her stomach,

    and there was a loss in energy levels. At some point she began to have stomach discomfort as well, this is

    when our GP started to give her pills to treat what he assumed to be stomach ulcers. Needless to say these

    also did not make any improvement in her condition. The GP then told us that because Kathleen had had

    cancer of the breast several years earlier he thought she should have some chest scans and arranged to have

    them carried out. These tests however did not show anything and on the same day as the tests they told us

    both that they were OK and gave her the all clear. Well this news seemed to cheer us both up at the time

    and gave great relief. Unfortunately her discomfort gradually worsened and a little further down the line

    back to the Doctor we went, Kathleen had now completed the course of tablets for stomach ulcers so he told

    Kathleen she could safely increase the dosage. I then told the Doctor that as she was having difficulty

    eating or drinking and that anything she took would be brought back. (At this point Kathleen’s condition

    was deteriorating quite quickly) the Doctor then said he would arrange to have an endoscopy carried out,

    that this test would find out the problem but meanwhile to double up on the prescribed tablets, even

    though I had told him anything she had tried to swallow would be brought back. How we managed to

    survive those days leading up to the Hospital appointment I don’t know for Kathleen could not eat or

    drink without bringing it back. On the day of the Hospital appointment Kathleen had to be taken in a

    wheelchair to the clinic ward she was so weak. Needless to say Kathleen was admitted on that very same

    day to investigate her illness. This was at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary there were many tests carried

    out and eventually one of the tests had shown a shadow on her left ovary. Because this now came under the

    care of the Derby City Hospital Kathleen was transferred there, where after many more tests and

    approximately 5 weeks later Kathleen lost her battle with what was a very aggressive type of cancer. Those

    were the worst 5 weeks for myself and our two sons to be there with Kathleen not being able to do anything

    to halt her sad deterioration that was taking place day by day. We were there with Kathleen every day in the

    latter weeks for they put her in a side ward by herself and very kindly put another bed in there so that one

    of us could stay there at night, we alternated my sons and myself, so for almost every second of the day one

    of us was there with her to bring any of her needs to the nurses attention. My own personal belief is that

    our GP has failed Kathleen by not reading and heeding those earlier warning signs, he has missed the

    chance to initiate the appropriate actions for tests that would have identified her illness sooner,

    perhaps then, there may have been more time to undergo surgery that could have extended her life. When

    the hospital Surgeon had told the family that he thought this to be a cancer my oldest son then used the

    internet where it lists many of the early warning symptoms about this illness and he probably now knows

    more on the subject than our GP. I honestly believe that if GP’s were not in such an hurry with their 10

    minute visiting times and paid more attention during their patients visits, were armed with the updated

    knowledge and latest developments in the detection of Cancers then it could I am sure save some lives that

    are otherwise lost through ignorance because those symptoms have been detected too late. Sadly this was

    the case for my late wife Kathleen, an opportunity missed, surely the doctors should be aware, have to

    be aware and be on the lookout for any subtle changes that occur and be ready to act accordingly.

    Apparently we in Britain have the worst detection rate

    in Europe.

    Please click on the link below for supportive information regarding this statement
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1655991.stm

  • maria
    28 July 2010

    Hi,I like the advet it’s great and make people think,unfortunately that is the life. I lost some people close to my heart,one of them was only 4 and I know loads people who had treatment and they are fine now. As well I had scae myself when i had to wait weeks for results.
    Next time something about awareness how to self check would be great.

  • Elizabeth
    26 July 2010

    Hello, I’m mid way through treatment for primary breast cancer, having recently had chemo and surgery, and awaiting radio. I think this is likely to be an effective ad, and I have worked in public sector advertising for many years so I have a sound enough understanding of how these things work. People will be affected differently by the harsh truth spoken in the ad – that our condition can recur and can be fatal. I can appreciate why some are upset but I hope people who feel this way come in time to focus on how much clinical outcomes have improved owing to the work of CRUK. My aunt died quite quickly in the 1970s with what I have. As things stand, my outlook is good and may get even better over time if effective communications help to raise funds to improve the cutting edge work backed by CRUK.

  • Vivien Pomfrey MSc
    26 July 2010

    I am absolutely in favour of medical research and attempts to raise funds for this. However, I wonder whether your donors are aware of the extent to which your organisation wastes money funding pointless research using crude animal ‘models’ of human cancers, which can never accurately mimic human cancer either in its development or its form, or the complex physiology of the human species in which the cancers grow and with which they interact. I am sure that progress would be a great deal faster, and lethal side-effects of drugs greatly reduced, if you followed the lead of more enlightened charities like the Dr Hadwen Trust, Lord Dowding Fund and Humane Research Trust and only funded non-animal, human-relevant research.

  • Heather McNiven
    26 July 2010

    I’m assuming that the previous comment came from someone who has never suffered from cancer himself or known a cancer patient. (Either that or he’s totally self-obsessed). I also assume that he hasn’t bothered to read any of the previous comments, because if he had, he’d know that Cancer Research UK receive no public funding for their work and desperately need public support. What do CRUK do, actually? Well here’s a clue: CANCER RESEARCH – without which we’d have no hope at all. If I’m wrong, and he has received treatment for cancer himself, let me ask one thing: how does he think the treatment he received was developed?

  • Carl
    26 July 2010

    Why can you not stop asking for money and start offering help. This advert just guilts people into sending money with no clear explanation of what you offer cancer sufferers. Actually what is it you do, do? I mean really?

  • Axolotl
    24 July 2010

    The expression on the face of the woman at the end of the ad haunts me… desperately sad.

  • sandi
    24 July 2010

    hi,I personally am getting over cervical cancer .I was diagnosed last october (2009) and I find the advert towards the end a bit unfeeling or uncaring .I am still feeling shell shocked and confused over my treatments and very emotional so dont actually enjoy watching this advert

  • ali
    23 July 2010

    This has been extremely upsetting for my family which is trying to deal with the traumas of cancer in a dearly loved relation right now; it is especially upsetting for the children too. I don’t think the flicking about from person to person works particularly well because you really have to concentrate to pick up what’s going on. Most of all, I don’t think it will have any effect on people who have not been exposed to the awfulness of the disease; for the rest of us, who already support the cause, well… some people might be wondering why our donations are being spent on an ad campaign which – at the end – emotionally punches those already affected where it hurts, and will most likely wash over the rest of the population. A rethink definitely needed please.

  • Pamela Harris
    23 July 2010

    Having been personally touched by a close member of my family diagnosed with bowel cancer and following the operation and chemo we are all very positive. I do feel that whilst your advert is very good in highlighting the wonderful work and how very important reserch is into cancer and would want everyone to be touched by it to give a donation, my heart sinks at the end when it is mentioned “it has returned”. I know that there is a possibility that for some people this may happen. But this to me must frighten and cause people like my daughter to go into a complete panick at a time when her young husband of 29 and only being married for 18 months is being so positive for the future. There have been months of being on an emotional roller coaster and now that chemo has just finished these young people look forward to the future.
    As a mother I want to keep my darlings positive.

  • Julie
    23 July 2010

    Some people have criticised the ad for being too negative (“It’s come back”) – but think what would have happened if the ad had simply gone on about how progress was being made, how more people can survive cancer now, etc etc….then it would have been criticised for being overly positive and ignoring those patients who are not going to survive!

    Personally, I simply cannot see any point in wasting money on an advert that only says how much better things are now for cancer patients! Yes, some people are surviving cancer, or at least living a lot, lot longer than they once did. But far, far too many are not.

    And, believe me, if some people here are finding it distresing to be reminded that one day they may be told “it’s come back”, how about sparing a thought for those, like my husband, who had to hear, right at the moment of diagnosis, that it was already terminal. That there was NO chance for him at all!

    In this day and age, a late diagnosis of cancer is not just tragic – it’s a disgrace.

  • Louise Sandison
    22 July 2010

    Very good advert – straight and to the point. Made more of an impact because it was not done by actors. Certainly does not need music.

  • jenny sharp
    21 July 2010

    Love the fact that people with real life experience of cancer were prepared to take part to help others.
    Full of admiration.
    Roops you are just fab! we miss ya!

  • Anita-Jayne Oliver
    20 July 2010

    I saw it, it delivers hope about what we are all doing, I am doing the best I can with my race for life and sponsors, but its her face, at the end, I saw it on my mum’s face and you made me cry. I just want to hold everyone with that face and tell them it’s going to be alright, but it’s not is it. KEEP FIGHTING, please, there is a cure out there I know, we will find it just hold on til we do OKAY. I love you all living and sadly dead.

  • alex berry
    19 July 2010

    This advert is briliant i hope it catches peoples minds to cancer. i lost my nan to cancer 1 month ago and will be donating 2 pounds a month and doing every 10 k run i can to raise money im even thinking about doing a marathon im in i just hope everyone else is too

  • Brian Overend
    19 July 2010

    The proof of the pudding is in the eating and time will tell if this ad has been a success.I think that it is very good and gets the point across.For those who think that music would help then I say why not try it with music but I would suggest something like Fleetwood Macs Albatross would be something that would stick in the mind.

  • Tina
    19 July 2010

    As someone who had breast cancer 5 years ago I am well aware that “it can come back” but really don’t want myself of my family to be reminded while relaxing watching TV. I find it frustrating that in the UK we donate more money to cancer research per head than any other country in EU but so many of the new drugs are not available to us or we have a long fight or we are just told they are not cost effective………Before you are diagnosed you don’t realise this, you hear about breakthroughs and new drugs and think great but then after diagnosis you find out these drugs are not available to you on the NHS but your oncologist asks if you have private health care, you might get the drugs that way! and you wonder why you supported CR for all these years!
    Also I would like to know why I received this email in the first place?

  • Emma
    19 July 2010

    This ad really make you think, it is both positive and realistic covering both side of Cancer, I can speak from experince of having been in remisssion for the past 2 years I understand some of the negative comments with regards the closing statement however I am also aware that for us to move forward with a break through for Cancer we have to accpect all aspect of the diesase. I hope that people can draw on the positive that Cancer Research has accomplished over the many years.

  • Heather McNiven
    19 July 2010

    Surely, in the field of cancer research, money IS everything; no money = no research, no progress, no development of better drugs with less side effects, no improvement in survival rates, no cure eventually. I live everyday with the fact that my cancer could come back. I had lobular breast cancer, which could happen again in either breast totally unrelated to the cancer I had before, so that extra fear is always there on the back burner. I want that cure to be found!

  • Russell
    18 July 2010

    I like the advert, But I also think it could have done with some background music.

  • Mrs Ball
    18 July 2010

    I had to write about the recent advert on television, in my opion it is disgusting, it’s bad enough having cancer, without being told it can come back, we all know this and do not need to be reminded, in my opion it is cruel and thoughtless to say the least – it’s a bit like saying don’t think your safe just because you have had the all clear, I can’t even bear to write down the last sentence of the advert, because it is every ones greatest fear, I think it is disgusting, it’s bad enough that cancer is used as a threat to all society to police them to behave how the government wants us to with out doing this, I really object to this advert and I will stop sending my donations untill it stops, after all most of the reserch is done by students who pay to do it. I am really really upset and angry. And yes afraid, every day of my life for the rest of my life, thanks for reminding me.

  • Stibule
    18 July 2010

    I saw this advert on television before reading the e mail asking for comments. Both my husband and I found it very moving. Our 8 year old son died of leukaemia last year after initially responding very well to chemotherapy, so we, too, have heard both sides of the advert. Although it is upsetting to see on television that this horrible disease can come back after it seems that it has been beaten, that is the bitter truth of it. It certainly should not stop people from getting the most out of their life while they have it, but the advert hits home hard to people who have NOT been through this experience and that is exactly what it needs to do, to get them to donate and fund a cure. By the way, while our son was dying from his cancer which now has an 80% success rate, we met another family whose child had an extremely rare form of lung cancer, with no known survivors. A year on, she has recovered, her hair has grown back, she is at school and probably not many of her friends know that she had cancer – there is ALWAYS hope…

  • Roseann
    18 July 2010

    I am 2 years in remission from AML. The advert is awful especially the ‘it has come back’. I am a very positive person which helped me survive but I find this advert extremely upsetting, I cannot watch it.
    I cannot believe that the person who thought up this advert actually had cancer!

  • Alison
    18 July 2010

    Well it took me a while to summon up the courage to enter a comment on this site and then my post got lost in tranisiton. I understand that every charity is really struggling for funds at the moment but I believe there are ways and ways to go about seeking donations and I think your marketing people got this one wrong if only on the sensitivity front. I do not know anyone who is not afraid of cancer and so surely an ad which says what you are doing and what you would like to do and the fact that you have no other funding would say it all. To be honest it feels like a bit of a cynical ploy to play on the fears of those whose lives have already been touched directly by cancer with the “it’s come back” line. As someone who is working very hard to keep the fear of that down to manageable size and knowing that negative thoughts can have a negative impact on my health it is not helpful to have an ad shining a light on something I had managed to put away and I know I’m not the only one. We all know Macmillan deal with terminal care but their ads are kind and sensitive, this one seems to have an unkind and hard edge. Cancer is hard enough on its own without the marketing crew then adding to it.

  • Alison Scarborough
    18 July 2010

    I have finally plucked up the courage to make a comment about this advert. I think that someone in the marketing department has misunderstood the aim of the advert. I fully understand how hard it is for all charities to get funding in this current climate but to, what feels if I’m honest, cynically play on the fear of every person whose life has been touched by cancer either directly or indirectly with the “its come back” at the end of the ad in order to gain donations is surely the wrong way to go about things. This ad has a hard edge and feels unkind unlike the Macmillan ads that whilst dealing directly with peoples same fears come across as kind and sensitive. I do not know anyone who does not fear cancer. Talk about what you are doing, what you want to do to hit it and hit it hard but please oh please do not keep shining the light on the fear of recurrence that any of us who have had cancer have managed to tuck away in a corner so that we have to deal with it again and again. Negative thoughts are not good for our health. I may of course be the only one who struggles to keep these thoughts in check but I think it unlikely.

  • Nick Bedford
    18 July 2010

    I have lost both of my parents and a more distant family relation to cancer. I am a Cancer Reseach supporter, but I do not like the new advert for two reasons. Firstly, the advert concentrates too much on the negative “It’s come back” aspect. Secondly, the style is awful. When faced with any presentation, be it an advert or any other TV program, where the shot changes every couple of seconds, I simply switch off. The style is irritating and simply detracts from the message rather than enhancing it. You really need to do better than this if you wish to drum up more support for such a worthy cause!

  • Swotof
    17 July 2010

    I am disappointed with your tv ad which mentions cancer recurrence. It would seem this is a central marketing theme this year as there was also a lady talking live about her recurrence at the Race for Life event I ran this year.

    As a survivor of breast cancer myself (5 years in), recurrence is NOT something I want to hear about.

    I suspect you’re trying to raise funds by any means but this is not the way forward. If you want my continued support, I suggest you come up with a “Plan B”.

  • Deborah Atkinson
    17 July 2010

    Well done to the people who featured in the advert, a good advert to the point- you do not need music, this is real !!! and it effects families, we need to have the research without it more people will not survive; our daddy died of bowel cancer; however because of the research more people survive like my sister, both my sons and me. I will continue to give in ways I can like the ‘Race for Life’. People need to know the truth. Thank you

  • Linda Scott
    17 July 2010

    My daughter has just finished her chemo treatment and is due for radiotherapy, she has grade 3 aggressive cancer of the breast and young children. To be sitting in front of the T.V. and the advert comes on ,which is very positive until the last moments, then the words` it`s come back`. Well she was so upset she couldn`t sleep that night. Surely if 1 in 3 people are touched by cancer either directly or indirectly then this advert has no positive meaning unless the last part is removed. People are not stupid they know how things can turn out and they give generously all the time but for my daughters sake and others like her worried about the future please remove the saddening last part of your advert.

  • djb
    17 July 2010

    I thought it was good until the end, it is upsetting to me. If people cannot donate without being told that people die from cancer and that cancer can come back then they must be pretty isolated. I have only recently been told that my cancer has spread to my liver and have not told my family yet, I am waiting until I can give them more facts about my treatment and/or chance of survival, to sit there when the lovely woman appears at the end for me is heartbreaking. I have read the comment from her mother and my heart goes out to her as my sister died from a cancer three months from diagnosis so unfortunately I can see it from the patient’s and the relative’s viewpoint, but I think the further sadness caused to people with cancer cannot be justified by the fact that maybe someone will donate some money. Money is not everything.

  • Stella
    17 July 2010

    Simple, to the point- there was no confusing the message with unconvincing actors, distracting music or over-done visuals.

    Good luck with this campaign, hope it brings in all the help you deserve.

  • maxine
    17 July 2010

    The ad is ok BUT my mother died of cancer in November 07 and this will be my secound year for doing the cancer research run for life,And I’m really proud that Im trying to do my bit to help others is raising money. But I would really love to see some black people in your ad because they say you never no how it feels until it hit home and ever since my mother had passed away with cancer so many people I know now has either passed or suffering with this diease, so please we are out there to (black people) dieing and fighting for our life, so show that we are being recognise to.

  • Gillian
    17 July 2010

    I can appreciate the concept, but splitting whole sentences up between different people made it all distractingly bitty for me.
    (Sorry!)

  • sarah
    17 July 2010

    please add the relay in next time 2 show it is fun to raise money for charity so maybe they may wanner get involoved so that would be more money for this fab charity!x

  • sarah
    17 July 2010

    I think its is good because it shows u can get cancer and survive :) or can get cancer but dont survive:(.
    everyone keep researching and keep donating money to cancer research uk the fab charity!!

  • alan sieber
    17 July 2010

    I think the advert is powerful, simple and strikes the right balance between hope and reality.

  • Sue, Berkshire
    16 July 2010

    I entered a comment on the 12 July, little did I know I would loose my mother to cancer two days later 14th. I wanted to say, without research I wouldn’t have had my mum for the extra years I did. I would like to thank Dr Wassan and his team at hammersmith hospital, Ducane rd, for giving my Mum golden treasured times with me & my family which i believe is due to endless research to combat this terrible disease. My Mum always said at least trialing cancer treatment drugs, chemotherapy, will hopefully help others in the future like others have helped me. The advert for me, is to the point, powerful and if it stirs emotions to remind people we need to keep researching but need help surely that’s being open and honest. I still think that maybe it should consider the unsung hero’s , the carers, like my dad and others who have to watch their loved ones suffer. Having said that the advert made me stop in my tracks and cry before my mum died……and now…..an even more poineint message.

  • Deb
    16 July 2010

    Hi,
    I like the advert and I think it is a good awareness approach. I am 28yrs old currently undergoing treatment for inflammatory breast cancer and I wish I dont have it and also wish to be cured and never for it to come back.
    I think the advert is brilliant and wish I have been contributing before now.
    God bless all who participate and give them healthy life.
    Deb.

  • Penny
    16 July 2010

    Really good ad! Hits the spot. I hope it raises you lots of money.

  • Beverley
    16 July 2010

    Hi,

    I think the advert is fantastic, its touching and moving and makes it more realistic as doctors and actual patients are feautured, the advert is raw, it’s not been covered up or sweetened up, it hits home about how horrific cancer really is and how many people, young and old, male and female it affects. Really well done, i think it’s brilliant but i also agree that some music could have bee featured to add to the emotion, just like the john lewis ad x

  • Maggie
    16 July 2010

    I think the advert is excellent. The lack of musical soundtrack actually makes it more poignant and more striking.
    Keep up the good work, keep saving my freinds lives.

  • Ronnie
    15 July 2010

    I found the advert did what it needed to do, pull at the heartstrings, stir emotion and make me want to get behind Cancer Research. I know the wonderful, brave, funny and unique lady at the end of the Ad. Some have criticised on here that they found the ending upsetting , that it wasn’t giving other sufferes hope. Please look at the Ad again, the lady at the end is hope – she beat it first time round and Ann will do it again, she grabs life with both hands and says this wont beat me – I will beat it!

  • lauren
    15 July 2010

    i think it is sooooo sweet that little girl and i know 3 people who have died of cancer but to all you familys who have lost someone recently im sooo sorry

  • Joanne
    15 July 2010

    The message hits home which is surely the sole intention!

  • Chris Stevenson
    15 July 2010

    Direct and to the point, good with no music and using real people – maybe more emphasis in the text to highlight that it can happen to anyone at anytime, the man or woman in the street, any of your friends,family, YOU !

  • Rachel
    15 July 2010

    I think the advert is short and to the point and music is not needed in this case, where as when it is the 5k race for life, thats when the music is involved!
    For years you have created wonderful adverts!
    The only thing that I believe is missing is the majority not knowing that these are people affected or work for cancer research, in previous adverts you wrote beside each person when they were diagnosed and such – I think that was a good technique to involve .. therefore its clear these are real people.. and for people who ork there.. say they joined so many years ago etc! ..
    Mybe people do not agree..
    I understand that people who have lost aloved one to cancer may not want to see such adverts! so you want the warning at the beginning however, you should watch it and be reminded of good times and be inspired that together we wil find a cure!
    Hopefully more people will watch this donate!..
    What is more important than a persons life? ..

  • janice milne
    15 July 2010

    This advert is very good and to the point and putting real people in who have had cancer is good and I don’t think it needs music but they could show more of what they behind the scenes. My Nan and Aunty died of Breast cancer years ago and didn’t have the chances they have today because not enough research had been done. With research my Mom and an Aunty got the all clear after having Breast cancer and because of Breast cancer running in the family they did tests and found out my brother and myself have 80% chance of getting breast cancer so with more research more can be done for cancer sufferers but they need money to do that and people did to be told so they can give money I give £22.00 a month so more can be gone.

  • Monica and Anthony
    15 July 2010

    A word to those who are complaining that the advert upsets them. We are the parents of Ann, the last lady to appear, and naturally it upsets us too. It is heartbreaking for us to see our beloved daughter having to go through so much pain and distress during her treatment and even worse to see her on television in such circumstances. But the idea of the advert is to help provide a future for her and her husband and three children and to prevent others having to suffer in the same way. She is a very brave young lady and we are all so proud of her.

  • Keith
    15 July 2010

    The message is very moving but, on a technical level, some of the editing between comments isn’t quite sharp enough, giving a slightly disjointed feel. It also took me three viewings to realise that the final comment was, ‘It’s come back.’ (I do realise how trivial this must sound to some people, but it is a minor criticism of a generally effective film.)

  • Angela
    14 July 2010

    I liked the advert and found it very touching because real people were used. The advert did make me sit and think. Having lost my husband 15 years ago at such a young age, and having our 18 month old daughter to care for. The advert made me aware that this terrible disease is still around. I have since lost other family members and friends to cancer. Cancer research will always remain close to me.

  • Rita Sharma
    14 July 2010

    It is made by real people who deal with this everyday, yes thumbs up for this effort.

  • Cheryl
    14 July 2010

    I think this advert is good in the fact that it uses real people but it isn’t made obvious… it should probably be worked somewhere into the advert that these are NOT actors and are all people who have suffered and/or work to cure Cancer, as it may then be a bit more of an eye opener for people who have never had the experience or heart ache of what Cancer can do to a person/family.

  • Nicola Symeonides
    14 July 2010

    This is a great advert. Very touching. I have known 3 very close members in my family who have died of cancer so this reminds me that I should help those so that they do not have the same fate. Keep up the good work.

  • Allison Morley
    14 July 2010

    Hi the advert was really good ,my brother died of leukemia which was hard when i was younger,so i can relate with the advert . My daughter has recently recorded a song for the Sara hope foundation to raise money for terminally ill children called gone to soon ,cancer research will always be close to my heart .

  • Emma
    14 July 2010

    This advert was very moving, i sat afterwards in complete silence at how much it hit home and how much this disease changes people’s lives. My Grandad is fighting Cancer and it was upsetting to see the advert but makes everyone know that we have to donate and support this charity to be able to cure everybody one day.
    Truly direct and powerful advert.

  • Jenny Riley
    14 July 2010

    I think the advert is brill, really brings home what both doctors and patients go through.

    3 months ago i lost my grandmother to cancer, she recieved fantastic care, cary on the good work.

  • Henry Scowcroft
    14 July 2010

    Ruth – Thanks for your comment and sorry for the fact that there wasn’t a transcript or captions available when you visited the site. The transcripts of the filmed interviews with the participants in our new campaign are now live on the site and can be found on our About Us website. There’s also a transcript of the above video here:

    http://aboutus.cancerresearchuk.org/what-we-do/our-new-tv-campaign/tv-campaign-transcript/

    Apologies once again for the delay. Due to the number of films we have produced it took longer than planned to produce the transcripts. At Cancer Research UK we do take accessibility extremely seriously. Thank you for your comments.

  • Lynn Saunders
    14 July 2010

    Very moving and to the point. The variety of patients give an important message that this affects us all. The doctor’s speaking show the compassion required to work with families going through this experience and is powerful in making the viewer want to participate in helping. This after all is the point of the ad.

  • Ric Coggins
    14 July 2010

    I work in the marketing industry, in PR in fact so recognise why this ad has been created and the process it has gone through in order to be made. However, having been diagnosed with cancer and trying to remain positive about the whole thing, I found the ad to be upsetting and actually insensitive. There are ways in which to get across impactful messages around fundraising without the upset it may cause along the way. I believe I am a strong person and I know if I feel this way about it, there will be many others who feel similar and in some cases may actually send them overvthe edge. From experience it is the people who approve of something that shout the loudest so while there may be a lot of positive comments left, I don’t believe it to be a true reflection of public view. I know it’s all about personal interpretation but it gets a massive thumbs down from me, simply because of the ending, up until then I felt inspired.
    Ric

  • Lorna
    14 July 2010

    Really great advert. No comment the advert says it all.

    Well done.

  • Louis Radford
    14 July 2010

    The lady at the end, for whom cancer has returned, should have been shown for a few more seconds. The first time that I watched the advertisement, I did not even notice her, as she was on for too short a time. I wonder how many viewers will not notice her and thus miss the key message?

  • adele
    13 July 2010

    An excellent advert.No music necessary in my opinion. Would dearly love to have more publicity given to men’s prostate cancer…symptoms; causes; treatments.Prostate cancer affects women too you know…whether it’s wives,mothers, sisters

  • Damaris
    13 July 2010

    Don’t add music as it a good, punchy ad, but agree with ‘warning’ logo. I am in remission but my partner is undergoing treatment for an aggresive cancer. Some people can discuss it, others can’t for many reasons. My parents can’t and get upset at even the mention of cancer; why force them to when they are obviously not ready?

  • Janet garner
    13 July 2010

    I thought the ad was very hard hitting but showed compassion and if I didn’t already contribute it would have encouraged me to do so. I thought the way it showed the doctors’ perspective as well as the patients’ was cleverly done.

  • Sam
    13 July 2010

    Adverts are necessary to add people to the donors list (I am on it for a lot more than £2 a month) but I do find it distressing as I have known many people die of cancer including some quite young.(Don’t think I know any survivors) How many people might you lose from the donors list becuase you don’t seem to care about them?

  • Heather McNiven
    13 July 2010

    I don’t think this new ad is emotional blackmail at all. It’s not aimed at educating us about cancer, we can find that information on the internet if we want it. It’s about telling people what life is like FOR CANCER PATIENTS. I lost my much-loved grandmother TO CANCER 7 years ago, and a very dear friend last year, so I know what that’s like. But I also had breast cancer myself 3 years ago, and believe me, there’s a world of difference between watching it and having it! You might think you know all about cancer, but having it gives you a whole new perspective. I’ve never felt so lonely and afraid. CRUK ads tell it like it really is! THE THING IS, one day there will be a cure, they may even be able to prevent it. But that won’t happen without our financial support, and the more support is given the sooner it will happen. Ads like this are raw, they strike a nerve, and it hurts. But if ads like this are what it takes – BRING IT ON!!!!!

  • lynne
    13 July 2010

    good and to the point, ordinary people. maybe a warning before so as not to upset anyone

  • Julie
    13 July 2010

    The ad, like all the CRUK ads, are powerful and emotional. But my criticism is that, like nearly everything in the media, it simply does not spell out the tough facts of cancer – which are: Find it early and live, find it too late and die. Huge amounts of money are put into trying to find a cure for metastatic cancer, rather than developing and rolling out lifelong, effective, accurate, cheap, safe screening for ALL cancers. If we can diagnose cancer before it metastasises, or before those lethal-at-primary (like brain tumours) cancers reach lethal size, then existing treatments will work. We shouldn’t NEED to find cures for metastatic cancer…..

  • Andrew Bundy
    13 July 2010

    I monday 12 July 2010 I was told that if i do not move to donate money to cancer research, the dreadful disease will come back to haunt it’s unfortunate victims.

    Emotional blackmail has hit a new low with your recent campaign

    It is not the first time that cancer research has used this tactic and sadly wont be the last

    I and everyone else worth there opinion know about the effects of cancer and do not need reminding or having traumatic experiences shoved down our throats

    I lost my mother through cancer, I know its effect on life. Why dont you tell us where the money is being spent and how you are developing as an aid to this disease? Instead of telling us in this sick way what we already know, how dreadful cancer is.

    I will no longer donate to cancer research, i find you methods of campaigning upsetting twisted and unethical.

  • Andy Hughes
    13 July 2010

    I think the most important thing about an advert like this is to get the message across to people. Sometimes this has to be shocking enough to grab someone’s attention and I don’t think that music is the answer, as in many other views previously. In my view (a music lover may I add) it recreates the moment of shock when a person is told that they have have Cancer for the first time and the same emotion when that person then informs their loved ones. It’s at that point that their whole world freezes and any sounds surrounding them are muted. If I would critisise any part of the advert, I would say that I wasn’t 100% convinced of the acting and I felt as though the people involved had a kind of ‘reading from a card’ feel to them. I’m convinced that these people are indeed surgeons/sufferers, etc but for me, I didn’t get enough emotion coming through. Music would over dramatise the advert and you hear music all the time in adverts so I applaud the writers/producers for that. Unlike the piont of view from Stephanie Shepherd above, I don’t think this requires a happy ending – it defeats the object and subsequently gives the impression that we’ve won this battle when in fact we haven’t.

  • Stephanie Shepherd
    13 July 2010

    Seems about the right length- concise. Although it needs music and it soudns too ‘bitty’ between the takes of different people- shoudl flow more. I know you want to convey the seriousness of cancer, but why not juxtapose teh visual shock (like the woman who ahd lost her hair due to chemo) with a great big smile and her family around her becuase she’s recieved the all clear? The ending needs more work I think…you know a scene with that woman and her husband kids around her witha a smile or something? Just a thought….

  • Romaine Marie T
    13 July 2010

    The advert for campaign on cancer research is very natural, informative and realistic. This campaign shows the serious committment of Scientists, Doctors and others workers for cancer patients. It is a great source of hope and encouragement for cancer patients who can understand that they are not left behind. Efforts are made to find curative treatments or way to extend the life for cancer’s patients. This will encourage the public to donate and or participate to cancer research in order to save life. Well done

  • Lucienne
    13 July 2010

    This ad stopped me in my tracks, was impactful, emotional and really thought provoking – brilliant. As someone who works in advertising I’m always reviewing ads, their impact and trying to asses the brief & objectives behind them. It’s such a strong approach – I hope you win an award.

  • emily
    13 July 2010

    I absolutely agree witht he woman who notes that it is really difficult for people living with cancer to be subjected to these adverts without warning or time to prepare. I have been treated for breast cancer and have been told I’m never going to get an ‘it’s gone’ now. The only way I can survive each day and look after my baby is to try to forget what is happening to me. TV adverts are a constant reminder and come as a surprise every time they are shown. I know you do vital work but please try and consider all of the impacts of cancer, the emotional as well as the medical. I may not have many days left and your adverts make each one I do have harder.

  • Chris Webb
    13 July 2010

    I agree with Annette. It is excellent and “saying it like it is” is the best way to be realistic. There is always hope for every life and if the brilliant people who can give us hope are given the resources to help find complete cures – what a glorious defeat that would be for all sufferers. No need for music, it says it all.

  • Minali Liyanage
    13 July 2010

    Short and straight to the point. Feels very real with the use of “real” people actors. I like that it has no music. I think adding music could make the advert cheesy and distract the point and emotion of the clip. Great touch at the end with the silence. Well done and good luck!

  • Heather Robinson
    13 July 2010

    I did comment earlier, but I wanted to just add my support to Paul Sandeman’s comments. My daughter is in the advert along with his wife and i think that ending with this brave lady’s silence is realistic but she seems positive to me! I have lived the last 5 years wondering if i will see my daughter grow up or if i will lose her, it just means you enjoy everything more and you treasure experiences, family and friends more. I realise that so far we are very lucky to be freed from this disease, being depressed and angry gets nowhere. If this advert offends or upsets you then please turn off the television in your lovely ideal world. This is real life and if you cannot bear to watch a group of skilled Doctors and brave survivors talk for 40 seconds to raise money to stop other people going through what they have gone through, then I am sorry for you. I suspect people who watch a cancer storyline on the soaps don’t complain when watching it for 30 minutes??
    I am immensely proud of all the survivors involved in this campaign.

  • fojaax
    13 July 2010

    well,i chope is going on.let me say about what i think.i think its nice for what uk researh are doing.i wish thay can form an hospital special for canser patients having a task force to observe patients on whats changeging to them with having the treament,observe the timing,work with astrologers studies and apply them .and get together,all the md,s,geniuses and even include me and i can gurantee we will find a cure.thank you.

  • Alex Kaye
    13 July 2010

    Regarding my first post on 11th July at 12:19pm;

    I meant that any workers in the UK would ASK their employers to deduct the pound.

    PS. The video was OK but let people know; but for the grace of GOD this could be them?

  • Ruth Randell
    12 July 2010

    I had a quick look at the preview about cancer but i cannot understand any of the people talking because i am deaf. it has to be captioned or subtitled. Please put the subtitles on for deaf people, hard of hearing deafened and hearing loss people.
    I don’t want them to be excluded because some of them have cancer or died of cancer too.

  • Annette Riddle
    12 July 2010

    Excellent. Don’t change a thing. Giving information which is a mixture of informative and hard to hear. Saying it like it is but also being positive. No music needed. Advertising at its best.

  • Jozie Coleman
    12 July 2010

    I have just been told my cancer is back so this will be my 30th operation but I live in hope everyday….This advert is FABULOS as it’s us (real people)it does NOT NEED MUZIK as it does the job it’s supposed 2….my arms had so many goosebumps when i watched it….I then signed up for £2.00 a month…
    GOD BLESS US ALL……xxx

  • Paul Sandeman
    12 July 2010

    The whole point of the advert titled “giving news” is about the people who treat and are being treated for the disease. If for some that is uncomfortable to watch then tough! Unfortunately we cannot live our lives with jolly soundracks and just focus on the bright rainbows! The lady at the end is my wife and we are living with hope, positive outlooks and complete confidence in the people at CRUK. Just because it might be bad news does not give you an excuse for submission. We do and will all fight to beat this horrid disease.

  • Margaret Nelson
    12 July 2010

    Seems fine to me.

  • Stephen Taylor
    12 July 2010

    The advert distressed my wife. She wonders if its producers consider its impact on cancer patients. She is nearing the end of treatment, with a good response, but fears the ending of the advert will be her fate. You would not raise funds to feed starving African children by showing them ads in which some are fed and others perish!

  • karen platt
    12 July 2010

    Having lost family members and my best friend to cancer and having nursed my husband with oesophageal and stomach cancer only a year ago, who is now in remission.
    I personally didnt get the shock factor to make me donate to cancer research. what in fact did make me donate to cancer research was my first visit to the christie hospital.
    I have never felt anything as powerful and overwhelming as seeing such a vast number of all ages right accross the spectrum all who have got or had cancer litterally battling for their life. That is a stark shock.The look of hope and desperation on so many faces.Maybe more emphasis on the people that are`nt going to make it or sadly didnt make it may spur people on to donate.I discussed this advert with my husband as said at the beginning who is himself a cancer patient. I think more people will donate on the basis of people who dont survive than the ones who do,when people think a cure is in sight they think that money is plentiful and not needed.
    I dont think the advert was powerful enough to reach out to the people who are lucky enough to have not been touched by caner

  • Tina Clarke
    12 July 2010

    I felt the advert was very poignant…dont add music! The people and their emotions they protray say it all. The ending is sad and I understand why it was put where it was. I keep focusing on how she looked and what it means to her…instead of how far research and success has come today!!

  • louise weatherhead
    12 July 2010

    very good and close to my heart as on July 10th last year I was told I had ovarian cancer. I have had two lots of surgery 7 cycles of chemotherapy and now in remission and have so much to be thankful for. I was so scared and thought I was going to die. i have done the race for life five times never thinking I would be the one receiving vital treatment. it just goes to show you never know what is round the corner.

  • Margaret Marshall
    12 July 2010

    I loved the advert, just the right amount of emotion, having survived breast cancer and chemotherapy myself I felt it gave a really positive message across which is so important. Keep donating.

  • Sam O'Nians
    12 July 2010

    I think the ad is very good, knowing that these are not actors enhances the poignancy of the message. I did find some of the drs lines too ‘chopped up’ though (they had only 3 words sometimes) and this detracted from the message for me. I have had cancer, my dear dad is currently suffering from cancer, the ad works, there is pain and there is hope. The ad needs to be aired a number of times, because each time you view it you see more emotion (particularly in the drs). Well done cancer research uk, you are amazing

  • jackie from bermondsey
    12 July 2010

    Just seen the advert on the big screen,the view is straight to the point,Im sure this will touch everybodys
    hearts keep up the good work cancer reasearch have done now and in the past.together we can all make a difference helping to raise enough money to improve and one day find a cure to this evil and deadly desease !!!
    ( Together we can beat cancer)

  • Ishfaq Mirza
    12 July 2010

    Good advert, hopefully more people will understand the impact cancer can have on sufferers and their families. People donate to the research it can happen to you god forbid.

  • Carolan Davidge
    12 July 2010

    Thanks so much to everyone who’s posted comments here and on our Facebook page – we really appreciate it. You’ve definitely given us lots to think about, and we’ll be looking through everything posted here to help us make future advertising campaigns even better.

    We’re sorry for anyone who was upset after viewing the advert. We do try to be as sensitive as we can in our advertising, whilst making sure our campaigns get their point across.

    To address a few recurring themes and specific points:

    There’s so much we’d have loved to include in the ad – for example, our work on highlighting prevention and early detection, the impact and achievements of our scientists over the years, a discussion of the (more than 200) different types of cancer our scientists are working on and their work on understanding how diet and lifestyle affect cancer risk. But as I’m sure you’ll all appreciate, advertising is at its most powerful when it’s most focused – trying to fit any more into the 30-40 second slots available would have diluted the campaign’s message and impact.

    That said, we’ve now published more information, including the stories of the people featured, on our website. There’s also a longer, more detailed series of videos on our new homepage.

    To address the point made about prostate cancer – one of the men featured in our campaign is prostate cancer survivor Nigel Foskett, and one of the doctors featured is our pioneering prostate cancer specialist Professor David Neal. And regarding David Grant’s comment about brain cancers – we’re also funding plenty of research in this area – have a look at this blog post about our latest brain cancer research.

    Erica – regarding your comments on donating to research that doesn’t involve animals. There are several ways you can do this, please contact our Supporter Services if you’d like to know more, their details are on our website.

    Finally, we’d just like to say a huge thank you to all of you who have helped support us. We couldn’t do what we do without you.

    Many thanks again,

    Carolan

    Carolan Davidge is Cancer Research UK’s Director of Brand and PR

  • Rosemary Griffiths
    12 July 2010

    Direct and to the point, I think music would detract the impact of the message.

  • Nikki Harvey
    12 July 2010

    The ad is succinct, says what it needs to on different levels and isn’t cloying or saccharine. No music please, it would turn it into the wrong ad.