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  • Health & Medicine

E-cigarettes – the unanswered questions

by Claire Knight | Analysis

30 May 2013

73 comments 73 comments

An e-cigarette

An e-cigarette

Five years ago you’d probably never heard of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes. Now it seems you can’t open a newspaper – or go into a newsagent, supermarket or pharmacist – without seeing them advertised or on sale.

For smokers concerned about the toxic cocktail of cancer-causing substances in tobacco smoke, e-cigarettes – sometimes touted as a safer alternative to smoking – might initially sound like a Holy Grail. We’re determined to reduce the number of smoking-related cancers. If e-cigarettes can help reduce this toll, it’s crucial to public health that this avenue is properly explored to fully understand the benefits and risks of these devices.

There are widely differing responses to the replication of the act of smoking offered by e-cigarettes use, known as vaping. Some people see a unique opportunity to promote a mass switch to vaping that would avoid the massive health toll of smoking tobacco on the 1 in 5 adults smoking in the UK today. Others see e-cigarette as posing a great risk that would keep people too close to their cigarette habit, making a lapse back to smoking more likely.

Currently e-cigarettes are not regulated in the way that approved nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) such as patches and gum are. This means they haven’t undergone all the rigorous tests needed to ensure their safety and effectiveness.

We want to see ‘light touch’ regulation brought in, to ensure the products contents and delivery is monitored and consistent, they are not sold to under 18’s and that their marketing does not promote smoking itself.

The increasing popularity of e-cigarettes makes it crucial to answer questions about their impact – not just on the health of smokers who use them, but on non-smokers, ex-smokers, children and society as a whole.

That’s why we commissioned researchers at the University of Stirling to identify the unanswered questions and concerns around e-cigarettes, and look at the broader issue of tobacco ‘harm reduction’ – measures to reduce illness and death caused by tobacco use.

We’ve just published their report (pdf), and a summary has been published in the journal Tobacco Control). In this post, we’ll look in more detail at the questions and issues it raises.

What are e-cigarettes?

E-cigarettes look like real cigarettes and usually consist of a battery, a cartridge containing nicotine (the addictive ingredient in tobacco), a solution of propylene glycol or glycerine mixed with water, and an atomiser (a device that turns the nicotine solution into a fine mist or vapour).

When someone inhales on the e-cigarette the nicotine solution is heated and evaporates. Research shows the e-cigarette user inhales a ‘hit’ of nicotine as they would when inhaling smoke from a cigarette (although other research has questioned how effective some e-cigarettes are at nicotine delivery).

Cartridges are available in different concentrations of nicotine, and in various flavours such as apple, chocolate, coffee and mint. Most e-cigarettes have an LED at the tip which lights up when someone inhales, in a similar way to the lit tip of a cigarette.

Are they really ‘safer than cigarettes’?

While it’s the highly addictive nicotine that keeps smokers hooked, it’s the toxic cocktail of chemicals in tobacco smoke that kills half of all long-term users. Traditional tobacco cigarettes contain around 4000 different chemicals, including toxins like arsenic and radioactive polonium-210. Tobacco smoke has long been recognised as a carcinogen responsible for more than one in four UK cancer deaths, and the biggest single cause of cancer in the world.

The lack of tobacco in e-cigarettes means they are almost certainly much safer way of getting a nicotine hit than smoking cigarettes.

But there are still some questions about the safety of the chemicals that are in e-cigarettes, and the current lack of regulation means there’s no way of verifying what’s actually in them, especially with so many different companies now entering the market.

For example, we know little about the safety of the propylene glycol in many e-cigarettes. And nicotine itself can be toxic in very high doses. So there are questions about the safety of leakage from cartridges and refill bottles.

Research has found that some e-cigarettes contain chemicals other than nicotine and propylene glycol or glycerin. Tests on some e-cigarettes have found small amounts of nitrosamines, formaldehyde (both cancer-causing chemicals), acetaldehyde and acrolein (toxins) in the vapour or liquid. These are all chemicals found in tobacco smoke, at far higher levels.

Given reports of malfunctions, we‘d like to see these products regulated to help ensure that the mechanical components in the device are safe and reliable, and deliver consistent doses of controlled chemical contents.

Who uses e-cigarettes and why?

E-cigarette manufacturers aren’t yet allowed to market their products as quitting aids, as they haven’t been through the strict tests needed to see how effective they are.

Some research suggests that smokers are already using them to help give up and we want to see much more research to be sure if e-cigarettes could be useful in helping smokers quit (or cut down) smoking.

So we need to know more about how people use e-cigarettes, and why. For example:

  • How many people are using them to cut down their cigarette consumption, or to try to quit entirely?
  • Are people using e-cigarettes in combination with smoking, for example to ‘get round’ smoke free laws?
  • If so, what impact does such ‘dual use’ mean for their future attempts to quit? Are they more or less likely?
  • Are smokers who may have otherwise successfully conquered their nicotine addiction more likely to stay on e-cigarettes (and thus addicted to nicotine) long term, if they start using them?

More research to answer such questions is needed to understand the long-term impacts of using e-cigarettes.

Effects on tobacco smoking?

One of the effects of decades of legislation against tobacco is to make smoking less socially acceptable, as more people are aware of the health risks and it has become more difficult to smoke in public. But the UK’s smoke free legislation doesn’t cover e-cigarettes. So we also need to consider whether using e-cigarettes in places where tobacco smoking is now banned might make smoking more acceptable again.

Likewise, e-cigarettes aren’t covered by the UK’s ban on tobacco advertising. So e-cigarettes are marketed all over the place, and even promoted by celebrities and at celebrity events – techniques barred to the tobacco industry since 2003. It’s important to look at whether e-cigarettes could serve as a ‘gateway’ to smoking traditional cigarettes – by ex-smokers, non-smokers and, most importantly, children.

More than 200,000 under 16s start smoking in the UK every year, so protecting children from the dangers of smoking is a top priority for us. We need to find out more about whether e-cigarettes are attractive to children (particularly given the appealing flavourings and heavy advertising involving celebrities), and whether this will affect the number of children who subsequently take up smoking.

Tobacco industry involvement

Over the last few years, the tobacco industry has become heavily involved in selling e-cigarettes – a move that is seen by some as an ‘insurance policy’ against future potential losses in cigarette sales. This raises many issues around conflicts of interest and the role, if any, of the tobacco industry in public health.

The World Health Organisation’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) is a global public health treaty set up to provide a united response to the tobacco epidemic. Part of the FCTC aims to prevent tobacco industry interference and there are concerns this will be weakened by the industry’s entry into the e-cigarette market and that this may simply be another tactic to keep profits high.

Next steps

Today’s report by Stirling University will help guide future research and ultimately answer questions about potential benefits and harms of e-cigarettes. A comprehensive report by the French Office for Smoking Prevention (OFT) has also just been published (pdf), which recommends a strict approach to marketing among other proposals.

In 2010, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), which regulates all medicines and medical devices in the UK, asked for feedback on how to regulate new nicotine-containing products (including e-cigarettes).

We told them (response 1015 in this pdf) that we think such regulation will help address questions around the safety and effectiveness of e-cigarettes. The MHRA response to this consultation is expected imminently, along with results of the research they undertook to inform their decision.

Similarly, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is due to publish new guidelines on tobacco harm reduction approaches to smoking, which may have implications for e-cigarettes. (Update: these guidelines are now published and do not include e-cigarettes.)

Quitting smoking is still the single most important thing smokers can do to for their health. We hope that the NICE guidance and the upcoming MHRA announcement will help provide smokers with the information and advice that they need to achieve this. And Cancer Research UK looks forward to working with others to deliver the research needed to inform the development of effective policies to support them.

11/06/13: this post was updated in response to the publication of NICE guidelines on tobacco harm reduction


    Comments

  • Rose Anderson
    24 November 2013

    I smoked for 40 years and tried inhalors, and patches in an attempt to give smoking up. They did not work for me. Pure desperation, drove me to try vaping 9 weeks ago. I have’nt had the urge to smoke since. My smokers cough and chestiness disappeared in a matter of days. My sense of smell and taste has improved dramatically and I can walk up the hill to my home, without stopping to catch my breath. I feel fitter than I have felt for years and vaping has saved my life. I have gradually lowered the nicotine strenght I’m using and intend to wean myself down to zero nicotine, then hopefully I can give up vaping, before our government tax it beyond my budget, as they are bound to do eventually. I will never go back to smoking as I’m enjoying being healthy for the first time, in a long time. I’m a 60 year old woman who is grateful that vaping has allowed me to get that cigarette monkey off ny back, when other methods failed. If vaping is banned, then many smokers who want to quit, won’t because something that does work, has been taken away from them. Smoking is a legal proven killer, the goverment should be banning them, but they won,t, because they want the huge taxes they pull in from tobacco products. Hippocrites, pure and simole.

  • troy McGinley
    12 November 2013

    I ve been a smoker for almost 20 years. Ecig helped me quit. I was able to ween myself off tobacco with the ability to select the nicotine doses . Now I just vape.. I m Nicotine free .
    I ve tried to quit smoking many times. Nothing worked. Quiting with Ecig was very easy.

  • Alan Beard
    9 November 2013

    Positive news stories and research studies are now quite a common occurrence (although lots of negative press also), what has been absent though has been Parliamentary debate at Westminster . This may be about to change as a number of MP are raising the subject eg Dr Sarah Wollaston in the Plain Packaging debate on 7/9/13 her position is highlighted in this excellent blog http://t.co/OSA0o3qsnZ .CR_UK we have repeatedly asked you to re-examine your position , are you going to attempt to lead or just merely follow ?
    I am afraid goodwill towards your organisation has either disappeared or is severely compromised by your illogical stance on e-cigs

  • Chris Knight
    4 November 2013

    OK, just read all the posts here and heres my humble and knowledgeable opinion.

    I am 71 and started smoking when i was 8 years old. Thats 63 years i have smoked. And yes i am still alive.

    One month ago, i tried a e cigarette whilst i was buying my twice weekly packet of 50 gramme rolling tobacco. I still have that packet, unopened and sat on my computer desk. I now only smoke e cigs and what a difference they have made to me. I still cough a little but only a fraction of what i used to. I breath much easier and my very eratic heart beat is rapidly stabalising to a modest 65 beats a minute.

    My sense of taste and smell has improved dramatically and i sleep much better. I feel so much better all round and have become more active. AND I NO LONGER CRAVE FOR TOBACCO SMOKE.

    Will i give up e cigs. Probably not, because after 63 years my body accepts nicotine. But i have given up smoking tobacco.

    So folks, for me E cigs are the bees knees. Hey, the way i am starting to feel health wise now i may even receive the queens ( or kings) telegram in 29 years time.

  • Mike Waxman (@MikeWaxman1)
    3 November 2013

    I’ll try again….

    I smoked from the age of 13. I am now 51. I have tried periodically over the years to give up, going cold turkey, using patches, hypnotherapy and prescribed zyban among other things. None have significantly worked.

    I came across e-cigarettes during an discussion on an online forum in July 2012. Based on the independent, unrequested info, I searched and was surprised to find a huge market out there.

    To cut a long story short, I bought a starter kit in August last year and, without putting myself under pressure to give up, started using it. Very quickly I smoked less ordinary cigarettes and in a matter of max 4 weeks, I found my 40-a-day habit cut to 3. In October of that year I smoked my last cigarette. I no longer liked the taste.

    It is now just over 12 months since I had a cigarette. And it’s all thanks to an electronic cigarette. My partner who smoked the same, if not more, than me is exactly the same.

    Both hardened smokers, I never for one second thought we would stop smoking. How wrong could I be.

    We now no longer have night-time or morning coughing fits (there is no doubt it is healthier!), we don’t stink …and we have more money in our pockets.

    If we could give up, anyone can. And anybody who tries to put a spoke in the wheels of this phenomenal invention can only have a hidden agenda. Shame on them!

  • Mike Waxman (@MikeWaxman1)
    3 November 2013

    Interesting – above post got through immediately …. yet my post explaining how 35+ year smoker has successfully given up through using e-cigs has still not made it.

  • Mike Waxman (@MikeWaxman1)
    3 November 2013

    Are posts here moderated? I’ve tried, now 3 times within last 24 hours, to post ….and nothing.

  • brainyfurball
    2 November 2013

    Alan: “ASH UK and CR UK could and should sort this out if they are to retain any future credibility and support from e-cig users/Vapers.”

    Now read… . http://www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_891.pdf Yes the tide is turning.. “The unanswered questions” – well ASH have answered one of them. Go to the factsheet everyone and you will get a very pleasant surprise.

    I cannot fathom the reason behind this. Could it be that the charities are in breach of the law by preventing something that benefits health for reasons other than heath reasons?

  • brainyfurball
    2 November 2013

    Marcy. So what if we do not know “how much nicotine” goes into an e cigarette. You really must try to keep up with scientific developments. I am no scientist but the information is so very easy to access if you cared to try. Nicotine, it is now being proposed, is probably only mildly addictive, and it is not nearly as toxic as first thought. How many of the millions of vapors can you identify as having given themselves nicotine poisoning – and I will give you another 10 years to answer because it will still be none.

    The nonsense you hear about ‘nicotine’ is as scary as an x rated horror movie, and just about as realistic.

  • p mccullagh
    27 October 2013

    the big man is just out for him self does not care how he tramps on now some one has took away his diner plate and he cant take it they have coned us for years hope ecigs take over they cant do as much harm as fags

  • Gordon Beard (@GordonAlanBeard)
    24 October 2013

    @marcy458

    I looked through your link , it certainly looks a well organised campaign group you have there, however without my wishing to cause arguments are you a grassroots organisation or are you funded by a larger organisation?.Whatever, your so called “scary” concerns are totally unfounded , responsible sellers batch test their e-liquid to ensure quality and samples tested and recorded. To make a comment of” not knowing whats in them ” is total nonsense typically its 3 or 4 nicotine, flavouring, PG /VG nothing more ALL products are well known and proven to be safe .

    You are erring on the side of caution , I wonder to what purpose and what are you actually advocating . I cannot speak for everyone who has contributed to this thread but we probably have ALL tried ineffective NRT and decided it’s not for us . What actually is the case is that we have discovered an enjoyable and relatively safe alternative to tobacco cigarettes that scaremongers,do-gooders cannot or will not recognise . Alternatively as is the case of some smoking cessation services they are starting to become concerned for their funding and ultimately employment. This is evidenced by the rate of increase in e-cig use( I quote UK only) Aug 2012 =700,000 April 2013 1.3 m Aug 2013 2m , ecig use has overtaken NRT recently .

    The main point of the thread .”.the unanswered questions”
    have been repeatedly answered by the users but still await the next response from CRUK.. I commend any reader to read this excellent article from a non-smoking(or vaping) government administrator who is involved in The Institute for Government http://api.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&key=bbb516d91daee20498798694a42dd559&loc=http%3A%2F%2Fallaboute-cigarettes.proboards.com%2Fthread%2F30639%2Fexcellent-article-govt-administrator%3Fpage%3D1%26scrollTo%3D549177&v=1&libId=8785384f-e311-4cb7-b86a-5baeb417b42b&out=http%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2FhfWEQ168RS&ref=http%3A%2F%2Fallaboute-cigarettes.proboards.com%2Fboard%2F25%2Fpromoting-campaigning-articles-vaping-media&title=Excellent%20Article%20From%20Govt%20Administrator%20%7C%20ALL%20ABOUT%20E-CIGARETTES%20UK&txt=t.co%2FhfWEQ168RS&jsonp=vglnk_jsonp_13825791075636

  • dave knox
    23 October 2013

    @ marcy458
    marcy I know perfectly well whats in my e – liquid because I mix it myself, in the uk as stated these liquids are covered by several consumer licenses that protect people from the kind of issue you are talking about,so to state we don’t know what chemicals are in e-liquid is a completely false statement picked up or copied from a propaganda statement read elsewhere if you did proper research on this subject maybe you could give more of a educated comment on it instead and understand it better..no offense meant..but just do more research before commenting it would do wonders for your credibility.

  • DAVE KNOX
    22 October 2013

    why don’t the so called medical professionals ask me and millions of others like me who used to smoke cigarettes and have switched over to a safer alternative for health reasons? the e-cigarette is a consumer led and consumer driven phenomenon and with no cost to government ? e-cigarettes are saving lives all around the world plus creating business and innovation at the same time. all the medical councils will do if they succeed in banning or making them require a medicinal license would be to force them underground and create the biggest black market the world has ever seen..now that is a very scary prospect and one the fake cloners and dubious make money quick merchants are closely monitoring. in the u.k as they stand e-cigarettes are covered by several consumer licenses that work very well in protecting the user of e-cigarettes and nothing more should be required. I agree slap a 18 certificate on them and deny them to teens of impressionable age but actually I would prefer my son or daughter to try one of these than actual cigarettes and I suppose in the real world I would prefer them to be saints and try nothing but that very rarely happens amongst the youth of today.
    i’m 63 now and after smoking for 50 years I think I have the knowledge and experience to talk on this matter since I switched to e-cigarettes my clothes my car my house my hair and skin don’t smell terrible any more and I finally realise the misery I caused through second hand smoke to my wife and friends and I am truly sorry for my thoughtlessness since I switched to the e-cigarette my breathing has improved drastically my blood oxygen has gone back to normal my taste has returned no wheezing no heartburn or acid reflux after three short months I feel better sleep better hell even my golf handicap came down to twelve my friends and family are over the moon and I have the satisfaction of knowing I will never smoke again this is a personal experience and one I’m sure is being mimicked all over the world so why don’t the medical people ask us for our opinion its free and doesn’t cost anything is it because they really believe that they know better? I don’t think so not on this subject. its time people woke up and smelt the coffee ( a nice e-cigarette flavour by the way) the e cigarette is here to stay and neither doom merchants /pharmaceuticals /tobacco companies /governments/medical councils or anybody else having a go are going to stop it ..the truth will out it always does

  • marcy458
    20 October 2013

    While one of the main arguments about tobacco cigs vs e-cigs is that it’s the tobacco that contains all the ‘cancer risk ingredients’ – don’t you think it’s a little bit scary that the FDA hasn’t regulated these devices – while some e-cig companies might be putting very little nicotine etc some may be doing the opposite. At the moment, with zero regulation – it’s not actually known what chemicals and ingredients are in e-liquids. That’s a concern…

    We would like to know your thoughts on this topic, and welcome everyone to our page:
    http://switchoffecigarettes.wordpress.com/

  • mark
    15 October 2013

    E-cigs are the best invention of the 21st century.
    The inventor deserves the noble peace prize, so please don’t talk **** to me about how bad they are for users because my health has improved 10 fold due to switching to e-cigs.
    In fact i suffered from OCD for years and since being on ecigs, that has disappeared completely.
    This stuff is miraculous!

  • Kieron kelly
    14 October 2013

    What utter rubbish apart from the very bad English which makes mine look good and I’m dyslexic where is there any evidence to back up this twaddle

  • Cheap E Cigarette
    14 October 2013

    I would like to comment on who are the user of e cigarette and why?
    People who are using real cigarette are main user of e cigarette. They are trying to stop smoking by using e cigarette. People think that e cigarette is safe then real cigarette because it is not contain toxic. It is giving feeling that you are using real cigarette so you don’t want real cigarette.
    But other part of e cigarette use is, Children are starting using e cigarette. This is not for them, but still they are using it and companies also target them for advertisement.
    https://www.facebook.com/Steamlite

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    14 October 2013

    Hate to burst your bubble but compared with 4000 ingredients which are killers to 4 ingredients in an e-cigarette which aren’t killers, you have no argument. Newsflash, the tobacco industry has ALWAYS targeted 11-15 year olds, this way they get children hooked and keep them for life…as short as it may be, they have a lifelong customer. Electronic Cigarettes are not intended as a quit smoking device, it is an alternative method for getting a nicotine fix for those of us who are addicted to nicotine but are not impressed with formaldehyde, cyanide and carbon monoxide!

  • Alan Beard
    11 October 2013

    Well said Gary , the Public perception of e-cigarettes is governed by the press they receive whether TV or newspapers . Until very recently (days) virtually every single news or press item was really negative with few balanced reports .

    There is a massive Tobacco Control Industry who successfully have manipulated the press to suit their ends, unfortunately we are lumped in with this campaign of scepticism and disinformation designed to discredit.

    When have we read in the Main National Press the positive studies that have emerged showing that e-cigarettes pose reduced harm to the user ?,

    ASH UK and CR UK could and should sort this out if they are to retain any future credibility and support from e-cig users/Vapers. It really is not too late to revert to your 2008 position where you were welcoming alternative nicotine delivery methods freely available with minimal safeguards and restrictions.

  • Gary
    11 October 2013

    A slightly related subject, cigarettes only get worse for you as the years go by. They add new chemicals to “prevent house fires”(fsc) or create better flavors. With this increase in chemical intake, quitting my 10 year long habit has only become more dire. I had used Ecigs in the past and only discriminated against them because in my head they were “electronic cigarettes.” In reality they are not, like many others have stated the Ecig is an “ENDS.” After giving up on the idea that they were just electronic versions of a cigarette i was able to get past my prejudice towards the product and embrace it. Now because of my amazing girlfriend i am the proud owner of my own Ecig and have been smoke free for 6 days. Its not significant but its a start and i feel as though people need to get over the simple misconceptions regarding this product. Its liquid nicotine, its not killing anybody so let it be. Any and all concerns should be addressed to our Gov. that so willingly allows products like Tobacco and Alcohol to be sold over the counter with hundreds of thousands of people dying from them every year – Just a random rant

  • Ronald
    9 October 2013

    It has been very impressive guide so far on E-Cigarattes. Even, I also think that before 5 years ago E-cigrattes are not so popular. But, now lots of peopel use this. The main reason to use E-cigratte is less harmful and less nicotin.

  • Victoria
    9 October 2013

    I have been a smoker for over 16 years; mostly due to the addiction of cigarettes thought. I recently started to ‘vap’ and I have not bought a pack of cigarettes since then. I really feel that due to the tobacco companies no longer getting my money is the reason surrounding so much controversy. It is clearly a harm reduction, since it works. I personally don’t ‘vap’ in a public building or around children as I respect the choice of others. I enjoy to vap and I don’t want it to be regulated as I don’t want to give the government anymore of my finances.

  • brainyfurball
    8 October 2013

    YES!

    http://ecigarette-research.com/web/index.php/2013-04-07-09-50-07/133-a-triumph-for-vapers-smokers?fb_action_ids=239457522872673&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%5B1422997987918994%5D&action_type_map=%5B%22og.likes%22%5D&action_ref_map=%5B%5D

  • 7 October 2013

    Hi
    Yes I think they should be some regulation on e-liquids but please don’t make a decision that will kill the development of this product and others that may come along.( people will always smoke better a safe way then what we smoke now)

    I am a smoker and have been for last 30 years, I have tried meany things in the past that have not worked this dose work. Yes I may not give up the e- cigarette but this is better for me and anyone around me when I am using a e-cigarette. I feel healthier without havering to go throughout withdrawal that stops most people giving up. Also remember you lot remember the majority not the minority when making your decision.
    The other thing thIs e-cigarette will save millions of live and if giving time and development I believe will in time would replace the cigarette altogether.

    Using e- cigarette will also save lives in other indirect ways as will, less house and bush fires as no lighted cigarette left or disgraced out of car windows etc.
    Give this one a chance they have the backing of smokers wold wide use this to make the tobacco industry into making a safer

  • brainyfurball
    6 October 2013

    Here is another unanswered question. It is becoming more and more obvious that e cigarettes beneficial in the war against smoking. Indeed, they are the most exciting development ever to have taken place. Is the silence of our medical practitioners further evidence of a powerful bullying culture inherent in health services?

  • brainyfurball
    3 October 2013

    Keep it up folks. We still have a long way to go but…. http://www.clivebates.com/?p=1526#more-1526

  • johnpeeter00
    3 October 2013

    safe regulation of ingredients (but not the nicotine strength or choice of flavours) and ensuring responsible marketing aimed at adults only (perhaps a ban on the e-cigs that look like a cigarette wouldn’t hurt – my e-cig looks nothing like a ‘real’ ciggie: stainless steel battery case and clear polycarbonate juice atomiser) should be all that is needed to save millions of lives and billions of pounds of burden on the NHS,

    electronic cigarettes

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    3 October 2013

    Exactly, well said

  • virginiaworld
    27 September 2013

    this is all a crock of crap……there are no carcinogens in the liquid that I vape! They arent harmful….and dont pollute the air. Guess what? I smoked for over 20 years & up to almost 2 packs a day! I was also taking daily asthma medication, using a rescue inhaler twice a day & breathing treatments 3 times a week. Not only have I been COMPLETELY smoke free for over two years… my breathing is ALOT better. I no longer need breathing treatments nor do I take daily asthma medication. I only take a rescue inhaler once in awhile when my allergies act up & thats it! People are making the switch & the politicians, tobacco companies & healthcare companies arent getting as much money. Therefore they have to demonize e-cigs & attack that market so that they seem as if they are doing good for the people when they ban them in public places & fill their pockets with new tax money http://www.cigarettespub.net/!

  • robert innes
    26 September 2013

    I will focus on ONE word in the report..” formaldehyde.” You claim this substance was found in an e cigarette…WRONG! The substance was found during research of the e cigarette. What is the difference,? It is this.

    The air was tested BEFORE the e cigarette was used and formaldehyde was detected. As the experiment progressed there was a tiny rise in the amount being observed. It is possible that the e cigarette contributed further to this infinitesimal amount

    The report STATES quite clearly that this substance was probably being produced by the subject himself and NOT being produced by the e cigarette. It is also possible that some was produced by the heating element but none is contained in the liquid. It is known that we do produce the substance ourselves and it is exhaled by us so that is the probable source.

    This scare story has long been discredited and yet here you are parroting – turning out the same old garbage. You must either be trying to deceive your readers or you are failing to do the proper groundwork that a topic of this importance deserves.

    For light reading and a good laugh go to… http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2402108/E-cigarettes-harmful-cigarettes-cause-cancer-claims-study.html (You will note the similarities here to your own document)

    To read what a REAL expert has to say about some of the supposed dangers, read…
    http://vaperanks.com/new-study-shows-electronic-cigarettes-have-no-short-term-adverse-effects-on-coronary-microcirculation/

    And finally can you explain the reasons for CRUK’s complete about turn on the issue of Nicotine delivery devices such as the e cigarette. Is it because in 2008 they had not been recognised as a commercial and financial threat? Back then you, and many, many other pharma linked organisations were complaining that the then NRT products had a weakness – they did not mimic cigarette smoking. You were complaining that medical regulation was strangling innovation and development and were demanding tax breaks. You were complaining that nicotine product WERE NOT ATTRACTIVE ENOUGH TO SMOKERS.. That and much, much more.

    Don’t believe me? Here you are..

    Chapter 8 Alternatives to smoking.

    Develop a strategy and an appropriate regulatory structure to improve the acceptability, attractiveness and accessibility of pure nicotine products for use as an alternative to smoking for those who are currently unable or unwilling to quit.

    Encourage commercial development of pure nicotine products designed for long-term use as a replacement for smoking.

    Develop a communications strategy to counter public misunderstanding of the health impacts of nicotine. This should promote nicotine replacement therapy for quitting and encourage the longer term use of pure nicotine products as alternatives to tobacco.

    Tax pure nicotine products at the lowest rate of VAT.

    Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of providing pure nicotine products free on prescription to smokers
    for as long as they are unable or unwilling to quit.

    Increase investment in research into the long-term impacts of nicotine.

    NOTE:” Pure nicotine products are products which, like the current medicinal products on the market, contain only
    nicotine and not other tobacco derivatives and which offer heavily addicted smokers the rewards of nicotine
    at a greatly reduced health risk.” So e cigarettes DO fall under this definition, except that they are not medicinal.

    http://www.ash.org.uk/beyondsmokingkills

    Note also the organisations which endorsed this document…. Perfect hypocrisy!

  • RobbieW
    24 September 2013

    “Costs and burdens of medicines regulation for e – cigarettes”

    Very informative report by eminent individuals ( Clive Bates & professor Gerry Stimson ) here;

    http://nicotinepolicy.net/documents/reports/Impacts%20of%20medicines%20regulation%20-%2020-09-2013.pdf

    Their conclusions;

    We conclude that medicines regulation for e-cigarettes will:

    Destroy the existing supply chain and most businesses
    Create a de facto ban on most products
    Make e-cigarettes harder to buy than tobacco cigarettes
    Favour the cigarette industry
    Induce significant legal risk
    Create high and unnecessary barriers to entry for firms and products.

    In short, medicines regulation focuses on creating a better medicinal product, whereas the public health is served by having better alternatives to cigarettes.

    With such views coming from people with such impeccable credentials it is indefensible for CRUK to remain silent and maintain a position that will cause many thousands of deaths.

    ALL EXISTING PRODUCTS WILL BE BANNED.

    CRUK, stop and think, do the right thing

  • Anthony
    17 September 2013

    I am approaching my 1 year anniversary of quitting smoking due to my E-Cig on 9/21/13!! I love them and have recommended them to many family and friends and they (not all) but most have quit smoking like me! The amount of chemicals in E Cigs dont even come slightly close to the chemicals in cigarettes and therefore are definitely a win win, the university at Boston did a study on them and they said there isn’t anything harmful about them. I agree the regulation of nicotine should for sure be regulated but all in all they are effective if you want to quit smoking, even if they help you to cut down drastically as many have that is still a huge improvement by far. I feel once the FDA does regulate them as a “quit smoking aid” instead of a “tobacco product” since they are not, then we will all be aware of the significant reward of being able to quit smoking and use a harmless vapor E-cig. The liquid is also available in “0” nicotine giving people the option to just have something to vape on for the effect of smoking, I am behind them 100%, leave them alone and dont pick on something that is doing people good like me!!

  • Richardo
    4 September 2013

    Also you must see the advantage the big cigarette companies have if these are regulated. Don’t allow them to regulate them. If they are regulated we are guaranteed a product made by companies that have no regard to public health. Allow E cigarettes to be regulated by the free market. The most healthy effective alternatives will prevail.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EZB447U

  • Glenn Turner
    3 September 2013

    After being a tobacco smoker for over 25 years, I have now been tobacco free for almost a month thanks to making the switch to e-cigs.

    This is my first and only proper attempt at kicking the habit – the motivation being a close friend being diagnosed with throat cancer , which is most likely down to his 30 a day, 40 year habit.

    The prospect of going cold turkey and my admittedly very weak self willpower have always hindered me achieving the single biggest health improvement I could make – but having the e-cig has made it unbelieveably easy to do.

    I made a clean break, e-cig arrived on a Monday and the tobacco I had left went down the bog the same day – I have absolutely no regrets at all, I don’t miss tobacco at all. I can regulate my nicotine intake and ultimately aim to be nicotine free in time, but till then my e-cig fills a void that patches and gum could never ever achieve for me personally, I don’t feel the need to comfort eat and it hasn’t impacted my life socially (I don’t feel I have to avoid situations where I would be in contact with firends and colleagues who still use tobacco as the temptation to have a ciggie just isn’t there any more) which has also made the change easier.

    Heavy handed regulation on availability, choice and interference from tobacco companies could have the potential to so easily undo what it has taken me quarter of a century to achieve.

    Safe regulation of ingredients (but not the nicotine strength or choice of flavours) and ensuring responsible marketing aimed at adults only (perhaps a ban on the e-cigs that look like a cigarette wouldn’t hurt – my e-cig looks nothing like a ‘real’ ciggie: stainless steel battery case and clear polycarbonate juice atomiser) should be all that is needed to save millions of lives and billions of pounds of burden on the NHS.

    My only real concern is that sooner or later the government will ultimately tax e-cigs so hard to make up for lost revenue from tobacco products – hopefully i’ll be nic free by then, but for future tobacco quitters it could be a real disincentive to make the best decision of their lives.

  • portable vaporizers
    3 September 2013

    e-cigs are the best smoking alternative that donot contain bad ingredients in it.

  • Jerry Smith
    2 September 2013

    Well e-cig is an option for those who is addicted to traditional smoking and wants to quit it completely.Then e-cig can be the first step to achieve it,though e-cig is also not beneficial for health but yes it is comparatively less harmful than traditional cig…

  • Reyrey
    2 September 2013

    It’s really a great and helpful piece of info. I’m satisfied that you simply shared this useful information with us. Please stay us up to date like this. Thank you for sharing.

  • Vape@e-cigarette Joyetech
    31 August 2013

    Read the article of 60 000 000 of consommateurs in france

  • Cristian
    28 August 2013

    First: http://www.utahvapers.com/clearstream.html

    Secondly, I notice that some people mention that the E-cigs still contain nicotine.
    Based on my limited knowledge, nicotine is produced by the brain, and it exist in every non-smoker out there.
    The addiction kicks in when the brain notices that nicotine production is no longer required, and stops creating it.
    Thus withdrawal is the period when your brain must get used to creat nicotine again.

    Nicotine is not harmfull (as far as I know and already mentioned).
    Everything that is harmfull is all the other hundreds of toxines existing in regular cigarettes.

    Based on all REAL facts out there(as the upped link provided), and my period as an e-smoker, I`ll stick to that.
    It`s better in every way than the regular cigarette.

  • Eddy - Optimacigs.com
    27 August 2013

    Sensation provided by traditional cigarettes can now be easily obtained from the electronic cigarette. Everyone can get it easily without worrying about health and disease that can come from smoking traditional cigarettes suddenly.

  • Shrey Seonerds
    27 August 2013

    Undoubtedly Lack of taboco makes e-cig less harmful but at the same time their is no strict regulation on sales of e-cig and also what other chemical it has is also not opened up by the companies.So their should be some strict regulations all over the world.

  • Darren
    18 August 2013

    Although there isn’t conclusive evidence on ecigs but at least we know ecigs do not contain all the harmful stuff a tobacco ciggy has, so one thing is for sure that ecigs are a healthier alternative

  • Ralph
    15 August 2013

    I’ve been a hard smoker for 35 years and started using E-cigarettes a month ago. I had severe breathing difficulties and couldn’t do much of anything when it came to physical exercise. The E-cigarettes have helped me in more ways than I can put into words. I can now breathe better and I am sleeping well at nights, something which I didn’t do when smoking. The only thing that worries me is our greedy, criminal governments who will want to try and recuperate their loss in revenue, due to so many turning to the E-cigarette. They just cannot keep their avarice hands out of people’s lives. The big corporations are what owns and controls our governments, so look out for huge numbers of research papers the government put out on these e-cigarettes, because they will all demonize this new and cheaper way of smoking. They will find a way to tax it so they can have their huge piece of the pie. Mind you, I have to thank the government for continuously taxing tobacco over the years and making it too expensive for people to smoke. Without their greed we may not have had the creation of the e-cigarette and I would be on my way to the morgue. I don’t care what excuse the government come out with, as far as I’m concerned e-cigarettes have saved my life.

  • gvnmcknz
    15 August 2013

    What are the risks associated with the liquids used to carry the nicotine?
    My wife is now on 0mg nicotine cartomisers.
    Are there any remaining health risks, how pure are the liquids, do the flavourings represent a risk?
    She feels the Menthol flavoured ones make her tongue “sting”.
    Perhaps there should be some published product comparisons.
    Regards
    gvnmcknz

  • Dampguiden
    13 August 2013

    E-cigarettes are the future, no doubt about that. The only question is whether it’ll be a domestic semi-illegal product, forcing users to buy from unregulated foreign vendors or if the government will open their eyes and allow for a free but regulated market

  • Chris Bell
    20 July 2013

    It Is this simple. Governments, the tobacco industry and pharmaceutical companies are losing revenue because of the increasing worldwide use of e-cigs and they are all trying to figure out a way to financially benefit from this little electronic saviour . But it is a drug delivery device (nicotine) and needs to be regulated and classified as a medical device. Yes, and so is a tea pot along with countless other unregulated items, most commonly consumed vegetables, for instance. Get real. You, as in the above mentioned are perfectly happy to continue reaping the massive revenue gained from LETHAL tobacco products and still allow them to be freely available for consumption, knowing the very serious health risks and accepting the utter misery and premature death that will be bestowed upon millions of people. Have a word with the Swedish Governments Health Department reference: Their drug delivery device. How many lives it has saved. The outstanding reduction in cancers and other tobacco related illnesses. They have over thirty years of science on the subject. We also could have had that information but you banned its use throughout the rest of Europe. It all comes down to MONEY and GREED. Happy vaping people. Oh! By the way it is really simple to make your own e-liquid.

  • lucy taylor
    18 July 2013

    My husband has been using e-cigs for only 3 days and is already a convert. From smoking 25 cigarettes a day for the last 30 years, he has now gone down to nil in 3 days! These things may not be perfect but they’ve got to be a whole lot better than cigarettes, so could the precious people out there please get a reality check?!

  • Kieron
    12 July 2013

    Love what you put Linda x

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    12 July 2013

    Thanks Kieron, it just had to be said xx

  • Kieron
    12 July 2013

    James T have you ever been a smoker! What dribble( I’m being polite feel free to put a more descriptive word in if you like) please show me your evidence that ecigs are bad for you. Also why not publish your ground breaking ideas on how people can quit the evil weed.

  • James T
    12 July 2013

    Smoking is terrible for your health and e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products are no good either. You just need to ignore the craving for 5 minutes before it goes away. Occupy yourselves with another behaviour that is health and you won’t even need to think about smoking. Take up a new hobby that keeps you busy and get a good support network around you. Sometimes it is not as hard as you think. For most people they just keep making excuses as to why they dont want to quit. Give it a go and committ to it… seriously, you’re life is at risk if you don’t and smoking is no longer seen as cool or tough. Get over it!

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    12 July 2013

    James T, when did you arrive from Mars and do NASA know of your existence?

    Just stop and after 5 minutes the cravings will go away, you are definitely from a different planet – Try tell an alcohol, “oh just don’t have another drink, start collecting stamps instead”, tell a drug addict “don’t have anymore drugs, go walking in the fresh air”…you obviously have never smoked, never vaped and have absolutely no concept of the word “addiction”, we vapers are addicted to nicotine, and I for one love my addiction, I don’t want to stop vaping but I did want to stop smoking – tobacco cigarettes have 4000 chemicals in them, when they are lit they become 4800 lethal, toxic and poisonous chemicals and the mutations of the 4800 lethal, toxic and poisonous chemicals then mutate into countless millions of other chemicals. Vaping was never, ever intended to stop people quitting! Get that in your head first. Secondly, it is purely by default because the electronic cigarette is so effective it has allowed people to be able to quit. It’s acronym is ENDS – Electronic Nicotine Delivery System. Not a Quit Smoking Device!! Hop back on your space ship, get out a pen and start writing about the human race!

  • Gina Conti
    9 July 2013

    I support smoking E-cigarettes over a normal cigarette but I do not claim them to be healthy. I know as a smoker that we need to do more studies on the long term effects of e-cigarettes before we go claiming it as some great alternative.

  • kieron kelly
    8 July 2013

    I read this article with interest . I started smoking at 14 and have many failed attempts at quitting the longest period I managed was 18 months. I now use a vaporiser and have never looked back. I’m not alone loads of my friends have switched too. I cant understand this negativity towards them I for one dread the government getting involved in regulating E liquids as I can see the strength being capped at a ridiculously low level and the price going through the rooof

  • Robert Reid
    5 July 2013

    How very true Fergus. I’ve spent well over a year researching these products and because I’ve been vaping e-cigarettes that long and will continue to do so, I will never stop learning. There is absolutely no point whatsoever in trying to put down electronic cigarettes. In the 7 years or so that they have been on sale they have, albeit not intentionally, allowed people to do what NRT’s have been unable to do and that is to quit tobacco cigarettes. Nicotine addiction…what a laugh, it’s not just in tomatoes, it is in staple foods such as potatoes, aubergines, mushrooms, cauliflowers, peppers, cappsicums and that list goes on and on! I have no quota to meet, and whether my post here is grammatically correct or not, my point is, these products work, whether it be for people to want to reduce their nicotine level to zero and use an e-cig as a physical device until they get out of the habit, or whether they want to vape 36mg of nicotine in their e-liquid, because they want to. We have rights too, just like smokers do! An issue yet to be tackled, take a look at the real problem – start with tobacco cigarettes and then go on to the deadly aspartame (aka sweetener), which has to date killed 180,000 people vs. deaths from nicotine – NONE!!

  • Fergus Mason
    5 July 2013

    “In fact, it should be studied first the effects of smoking e-cigarettes.”

    You’re not a native English speaker, are you, “Bernard”? In fact you were paid to write comments attacking electronic cigarettes, weren’t you? I’m a freelance writer and I know exactly how often this happens. Your comment – simplistic, ungrammatical and riddled with errors as it is – shows all the signs of a Bangladeshi freelancer trying to meet his quota of 1,000 blog comments a day.

  • Fergus Mason
    5 July 2013

    “I feel that while an E-cigarette could help some people quit, it can also make others smoke more.”

    Except all the evidence from every study shows exacly the opposite – smokers who start using an e-cigarette smoke LESS.

    “These people can now smoke inside without the dangers of second hand smoke.”

    No, they can’t. Smoking inside remains illegal.

    “Also if they were truly good for people there would be no nicotine in them.”

    They’re not good for people and nobody ever claimed they were; what’s being claimed – accurately – is that they’re less harmful than smoking is. Nicotine isn’t a problem anyway. It’s no worse for you than caffeine is, which is just as well seeing as most vegetables contain it.

  • Vincent Jones
    3 July 2013

    I think that E-cigarettes need a lot more testing before people go claiming that they are “healthy” or a way to quit smoking. We need more information.

  • Dale
    2 July 2013

    I feel that while an E-cigarette could help some people quit, it can also make others smoke more. For example people who only smoke outside so that the smoke doesn’t “harm” anyone else. These people can now smoke inside without the dangers of second hand smoke. Thus giving them more time to smoke. Also if they were truly good for people there would be no nicotine in them.

  • Electronic cigarettes
    25 June 2013

    These products have helped the UK government hit there smoking reduction targets far earlier that set AND without any cost to the tax payer. I can not understand why there is not more positive support for this product. Where is the evidence of defective products? you mean someone’s electronic cigarette broke and they had to buy a new one? So we should ban the whole industry?!?! All these points against electronic cigarettes are purely laughable.

  • Gordon Beard
    18 June 2013

    As Deborah Arnott of ASH has stated (repeating very eminent scientists position) nicotine is addictive BUT not harmful.

    The position of current NRT policy seems to recognise that long term use is a possible course of action that can be used. .

    From Smoke in England studies ASH’s own data is clearly showing that the 1.3 million current e-cig users are having success at their attempt to cease smoking tobacco cigarettes ASH quoted (out of date stat.) that 20% of users had quit smoking long term by using e-cigs( now 30% min.)

    30% long term quit rate compares very favourably with regulated NRT figures of 5-7%

    BUT for one moment I wish to revisit nicotine , many ideologists in tobacco control do not consider that an e-cig user has quit (even though have stopped smoking tobacco) until they are nicotine abstinent.

    The task of prohibition of nicotine is an impossible one why cannot the followers of this ideology focus their attentions power and influence onto the real killer -tobacco cigarettes. This is the 21st century not the middle-ages lets have reason, debate and find solutions as promoted in Singapore where the population was consulted about how to reduce Smoking tobacco – not bans or excessive regulation .

    Since e-cigs started to gain some popularity since 2007 there has been no evidence of death/injury that could be placed . So 6 years have gone by in a rapidly changing expanding market with no known harm .

    Others far more qualified and eloquent than I could state my case far clearer but I simply wish to put the case for tightening of current regulations not for a “light” or “right touch” medical regulation which will result in a totally unjustified restriction in availability of life saving products .

  • Susan Wilson
    16 June 2013

    I stopped smoking cigarettes myself 10 months ago by using e-gigs. I have not had a single tobacco cigarette in that time and indeed found that whenever I felt the need for a cigarette and used an E-cig my craving was satisfied. I have attempted many times to stop smoking but always started again. I even used a drug called “Champix” prescribed (twice) by my GP and although I had a few months of cessation I went back to cigarettes. I feel so much healthier and also happier as I don’t feel the guilt of smoking tobacco. My friends and family are also much happier and indeed some friends have followed me into the vaping of E-cigs and feel better for it. I also smell sweeter and am fitter since giving up the weed that is tobacco. If E-cigs are banned or difficult to purchase I’d most certainly start smoking again.. How can banning them or even taxing them like tobacco products are be a good thing?

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    16 June 2013

    Susan and Dodderer – spot on, in our blog post http://www.cool-breeze-e-cigs.com/e-cigarettes-are-the-future/ we are asking some very probing questions regarding the WHO’s stance (World Health Organisation) on electronic cigarettes and why the need to re-classify and what they really want, ban them! Why, if there is going to be a ban why not ban tobacco cigarettes, which kills someone every 5 minutes! We, the people who have smoked and those who are looking for alternative, cleaner, safer methods to smoke ie. vaping, should know these things, they should know the corruption within the tobacco industries, the pharmaceutical companies and the back pockets of many a head of state. These people are mapping out our lives for us and it is we, the general public who have the ultimate say. I will not be forced back on to cigarettes, I will not accept the electronic cigarette as a medicinal device as I am not ill, I do not want to quit my nicotine, I want to quit all the other 3999 ingredients which are toxic and potentially lethal, and why don’t I have that right….because the rich will be less well off, tough, our lives mean more to us than your fat cat way of living, deal with it, don’t label us and put us in a NRT club, a “they have to be stopped” club, get on with your own lives, invest your billions into something else, like World Health, and stop telling us how we can live our lives.

  • Dodderer
    13 June 2013

    The rise of ecigs poses many awkward questions:

    why,after 5 years on the market,do we know nothing about them?

    why have they been so successful?

    does the ineffectiveness of NRT pose more of a threat to public health than a benefit?

    is not the reward to risk ratio so great that they should be encouraged?

    what actual problems have arisen that require pre-emptive action?

    With no balancing voice to Tobacco Control policies,mistakes will not be identified or rectified.Our lives are at stake – theory,opinion and academic research is not helping us.

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    15 June 2013

    The fact is that electronic cigarettes are here to stay. The reason is simple, smokers are fed up with high prices and constant in your face guilt tripping. When you look at the shocking failure rate of current NRT, and consider that NRT is priced to cost MORE than smoking, it is no wonder that many smokers are taking a gamble on e-cigs and vaping.
    In the UK, using an electronic cigarette to deliver your required nicotine fix costs just 5% of the price of smoking tobacco. Given that smoking tobacco is PROVEN to Kill you and shorten your life, and so far in 5 years over 5million smokers have switched to vaping with no reported deaths, what would you do?
    The problem arises when e-cigarette companies target or sell to non smokers, especially the young. Can anyone show that under 25’s who try an electronic cigarette would not have tried a tobacco cigarette?
    It is a shame that no one has the balls to ban tobacco cigarettes, and prescribe every smoker an e-cigarette.
    The main fact is that the risk of electronic cigarettes being more harmful than tobacco smoking is one that vapers are happy to take!

  • PAUL
    12 June 2013

    I will not buy a big tobacco or big pharma made product. If all the mom and pop vape shops are pushed out of business by the government (for the people my ass) or big tobacco, I will find a way to buy ingredients from China or the like manufacture e liquid myself. The real issue here is that my 4-5 dollar a day black and mild habit has been reduced to a 1 dollar or less vape habit. Multiply my 3 or so dollars a day habit by a million and you see the loss to government coffers and shareholder earnings. I believe this is why the over the counter made to look like the real thing e cigarrettes are absolute garbage (short battery and vaping time, pack says equivalent to 200 cigarettes- utter bullshit) and more expensive then real cigarrettes.

  • Chris Price
    6 June 2013

    Not sure why nicotine dependence is a ‘problem’? I doubt if you would see your coffee or tea dependence as a problem. Nicotine has about the same implications for health as coffee. It’s near enough harmless unless you have some form of genetic issue. Unlike caffeine or alcohol, nicotine is a normal and natural part of the diet, and everyone tests positive for it. It is hardly a ‘problem’.

    The main ‘problem’ is that most people think that nicotine is a problem. Nicotine is more normal to consume than other similar materials, everyone tests positive for it, and it is unlikely to be dependence-forming unless first supplied in tobacco smoke. The nicotine in tobacco smoke is about one-millionth as harmful as the smoke.

  • David Edwards Insurance
    6 June 2013

    I think that people using e-cigarettes as a healthier choice is a good thing to start with but the fact that they still addicted to the nicotine is the problem.

  • reply
    Robert Reid
    6 June 2013

    Can I just reiterate what Chris Price has said. Everyone does test positive for nicotine and if they don’t they’d be quite ill. As it is a naturally occurring chemical, it is a lot of our every day foods. Potatoes, a staple diet throughout the world. Aubergines = extremely high in nicotine and it is important to remember that the nicotine only dissipates slightly when cooked. Some more, cappsicums, chillis, cauliflower, mushrooms.

    Also, it has been proven throughout the world that NRT has a success rate of less than 10%…the electronic cigarette was not intended to help people quit and it is still a grey area as far as advertising is concerned. It is an Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS), some people have used the electronic cigarette and reduced the level of nicotine they use/inhale, what’s bad about that, also it is a well known fact that a hit of nicotine, makes your brain more receptive, more productive…as Chris Price says, isn’t that what people crave when they want a cup of tea or coffee – what next an outlaw on that too? What people should really be taking a very close look at is how the hell aspartame was ever passed by the FDA in the US….now it’s here and has been for years, making people ill, depressed, overweight, it’s crazy now that is what I call a drug and it’s not a naturally occurring one either

  • Liz
    4 June 2013

    I am a regular vapor (12mg nic tobacco flavour) I prefer to use a cartomiser rather than a product that is designed to look like a cigarette. This is because I am an ex smoker and prefer to distance myself from something that has killed millions and also blighted the life’s of many more. Also I think that calling it an ECig perpetuates the myth that you are addicted to cigarettes. It’s the nicotine that is addictive rather than all the other chemicals in cigarettes. As an ex smoker myself (13-51 years) I think I am able to comment on why vaping is much healthier, even if long term studies are still ongoing. My blood pressure has returned to normal 115/80, my pulse rate is now 72 after being above 100 for several years. I don’t ‘hack’ up every morning or use an inhaler (which also contains propyl glycanol BTW). My skin in now rosy rather than grey and I don’t stink like the bottom of an ashtray! I think there should be legislation but only so far as ensuring consumers are able to trust the quality of the product they choose and the integrity of their suppliers. I also think they should only be available to over 18’s as you are then able to make an informed choice yourself. I did extensive research before I decided to change my life (and better my health) forever. There are numerous websites, bloggs and forums out there, but beware, don’t forget that everybody has their own agenda. An excellent source of up to date information and research is being carried out by https://www.facebook.com/konstantinos.farsalinos. He is a Doctor based in Greece. He seems to be one of the few who are actually looking at it objectively. As a free thinking, but not very scientific adult, I find it bizarre that Democratically elected governments are choosing to ban something that has not been proven to harm the individual or anyone else in close proximity to them. Surely the miriad of known harmful effects of smoking, alcohol and sugar should worry them more.

  • Bernard I. Fowler
    4 June 2013

    I think that e-cigarettes are not safe because they contain nicotine! Manufacturers say they are safe in order to attract customers. In fact, it should be studied first the effects of smoking e-cigarettes.

  • debp
    3 June 2013

    Do u think e – e-cigarette could be the solution for the as an alternative for hard smoker .. you can monitor your nicotine level with the time if you change dose .. one you may end up with nonsmoker .. if so I am exited to use it.

  • katie
    1 June 2013

    I am a e-cigarette user an I can not speak for all who use them but in my case an many more I have stopped smoking I had my last cigarette 2 months ago me an my children are breathing better have not been sick I can walk more an longer then I could when smoking I have no trouble running up an down stairs all day at work I smell better things taste better I started vaping a 24 mg of nic I have worked my way down to a 12 mg an plan to keep stepping down on nic levels till I no longer need to use the ecig at all I started smoking at age 13 im now 30 I have tried several other ways to stop smoking gum patches pills stopping cold turkey nothing worked for me till I bought a ecig now I feel healthier an im also very proud of my self an my kids are proud of me too an that means the world to me

  • Sarah Kaufman
    1 June 2013

    Electronic cigarettes are many in the market, but to find the one brand or type that is the best electronic cigarette among many good ones requires some prior knowledge about the product.

  • Frank Lee
    31 May 2013

    tobacco giants invented the earliest known e-cigarette as far back as 1998. it will inevitably fall to them to market and promote the products as is quickly becoming evident.

    Brand recognition in wider marketing will therefore become commonplace and probability does suggest e-cigarettes would be used to additional advantage.

    their regulation is seemingly something which most advocates actively promote even if by prevarication and often while in denial.

    it would appear that where a majority of e-cigarette users too do in effect desire degree of regulation, terms of which are being inadequately designed by those duly able and coordinated. the implications of the current approach is akin to the early establishment and onset of tobacco, with safety playing second fiddle to profit.

    decisions could perhaps be in much better hands.

    the e-cigarette if wisely regulated and accurately monitered, might ultimately prove itself to be the saviour which many have placed their faith in, but it would be quite naive to forget how their relative infancy detracts from ample long term study.

    added anomaly lies in the consumer association for UK e-cigarette users, and its negatively charged approach to information and wider promotion of e-cigarettes. their habits do appear to be undergoing slight alteration presently, but message taught to their previous audience, made for truly grim reading. it leaves little wonder why many e-cigarette consumers now fear hint mention or suggestion of any external regulation, and often lends root to passionate defense and confrontation.

    summing up my points, it is already a huge potential industry and stakes are high and vast. regulation is inevitable but also necessary. having played witness to current underhandedness, i feel future development is inevitable. early, wise, external regulation and policing, might at least confine opportunism.

  • Gordon Beard (@GordonAlanBeard)
    31 May 2013

    After reading this article I was about to write a reply , but lo and behold the first reply contained the very sentiments I was about to put(less eloquently though)

    I simply fail to understand the negativity of the writer and Cancer Research in general towards Harm Reduction .We can all quote statistics but one fact from ASH … there are now 1.3 million e-cig users

    In theses tough times are we really saying that 1.3 million(up from about 750,000 early 2012) have been duped into wasting their money and converted to e-cigs by deception and delusion .

    In all retail aspects of life people vote with their feet .. they can see it is working for them over the frankly useless NRT .and as long as any proposed regulation is not too draconian users will top 2 million at least by end 2014 .

    Research exists if you care to look for it that is detailed scientific independent study , much of the problem exists where studies are sponsored or supported by Big T or Big P.-outcomes have the possibility of being pre-determined

    As Chris suggested above why don’t you sponsor a detailed independent study with the potential of helping to save hundreds of thousands of tobacco smokers lives every year

  • Robert Monroe
    31 May 2013

    The other comments could not have been put any better. There are significant advantages to eliminating tobacco, tar, and smoke consumption. How people perceive e-cigarettes really is a matter of their independent view. Some people do see them as a platform to begin the process of quitting tobacco smoking. Some people still want nicotine and e-cigarettes can deliver the nicotine when e-liquid is vaporized. Others need to simulate the “act of smoking” and attribute to habits and routines than have come accustomed to over the years. Has all the conclusive research been done? No. But people understand they are still inhaling “foreign substance” into the lung to satisfy their individual need. No matter how people perceive them the elimination of tobacco smoke is better for them and the public…but to what degree we shall still see when consensus studies are complete and conclusive.

    Robert Monroe
    Halo Cigs

  • Zinia Thomas
    31 May 2013

    Thanks Claire for share your views about e-cigarette I heard various news about e-cigarette but have no clear idea about this. I will help our society to recover from tobacco addiction.

  • Robert Reid
    31 May 2013

    Chris Price could not have put it better, he has covered all areas and all are poignant questions which need answers. There seems to be so much controversy and ambiguity surrounding the electronic cigarette, and this is because as Professor Britton has said “e-cigs can prevent deaths”. You cannot sit on the fence and argue that some e-liquids show that they have trace amounts of carcinogens in and need more testing…the proof is of the people who vape.

    My wife has been vaping for a year, after smoking 20 a day for 37 years. She has had breast cancer, she still smoked because of the stress. She tried NRT in all forms including hypnotherapy, none of which worked. She picked up her first e-cigarette on the 23rd June 2012 and has not touched another cigarette since. She feels the benefits absolutely, we also feel the benefits to our cashflow!

    Yes indeed, the tobacco companies have joined, but in every single article I have read about the tobacco companies, they have not once touched on how many lives could be saved or deaths prevented, I have however read their proposed market share and how many billions they hope to pocket in the forthcoming years! These are the people who have lied to us for generations, who have targeted children, who have targeted third world countries, they have no morals, no ethics, no integrity, no conscience and definitely no scruples. They will stop at nothing to ensure that their shareholders are kept happy. Will they dig into their very deep pockets though to carry out intense research? Will they dupe us all again and put in unnecessary ingredients in the e-liquids? As a vaper and as a owner of an e-cig company, I do not welcome their presence in this industry, nor do I know of any other vaper who would buy from them!

    Small independent companies have worked hard, done their research, crated action groups, we plough our money in for trials and testing, only to find that those who can not only keep the governments happy, they can line the pockets of the big pharma and keep a smile on the face of the World Health Organisation WHO’s pulling WHO’S strings here?

    I truly believe that the tobacco giants were the main protagonists in the war on e-cigarettes, the media coverage of them being unsafe, none of it worked and the tobacco companies were stuck between a rock and a hard place – they thought the e-cigarette was a fad and gimmick which would die out, but now the big boys are here to put us all in our places and make the world safe again! Ha, I really can’t keep my tongue in my cheek much longer!

    Rob Reid

  • Chris Price
    30 May 2013

    The success of consumer products such as e-cigarettes and Snus depend on (a) unhindered access to a full range of products unrestricted by unnecessary regulations, and (b) truthful information regarding the relative risks being given to consumers. You can see the effect of unhindered access to such products in Sweden, which is the world leader in the reduction of smoking prevalence and smoking morbidity and mortality. As the products have no more than normal consumer protections, which is all that is needed, and the health risks of Snus consumption are too low to detect by statistical methods, about 50% of Sweden’s smokers have switched; with the result that Sweden is the only country in the world with a realistic prospect of reducing smoking deaths to insignificant numbers (in about 3 years’ time, male smoking prevalence there will be at 5% – a number so phenomenally low it is utterly out of the question for any other developed country). As I’m sure you are aware, Sweden has the EU’s lowest rate of male lung cancer (and oral cancer). Now there is a country that is actually *doing* something about the problem.

    E-Cigarettes are likely to prove as safe as or safer than Snus. Already 7% of UK smokers have switched, and by 2020, or at the latest 2025, 25% of UK smokers will have switched. As Prof Britton of the RCP says, “If all UK smokers switched to e-cigarettes, five million lives would be saved just in those who are alive today”. What we are looking at here is the greatest advance in public health since the discovery of antibiotics.

    If you argue against this, you risk being placed in the same category as the US pseudo-health organisations that are clearly nothing more than front groups for the pharmaceutical industry.

    There is no such thing as ‘light-touch’ regulations. They will be operated by the pharmaceutical industry’s friends in government, with a view to crippling e-cigarettes as soon as possible. Since the UK is the only country in the world, as far as I am aware, where e-cigarettes are comprehensively and efficiently regulated, then asking for more than the 17 statutes they must currently comply with begs the question: whose side are you on? Public health or pharma? What are the serious incidents in the millions of user-years so far that need the implementation of even more strict regulations?

    I think that members of the public who donate to you in the hope of helping to prevent or cure cancer have the right to know that you appear to be working hard to promote it. Instead of promoting cancer by protecting the cigarette trade from competition, why not do something positive, and offer to assist the e-cigarette trade with laboratory testing and analysis?

    And please stop this innuendo linking the tobacco industry with the ecig trade; they started buying ecig firms last year, and have only recently become involved. 99.9% of e-cigarette firms are small businesses working hard to improve public health. How about assisting them in practical ways instead of attacking public health? How about doing something useful with your funds instead of using them to protect smoking and to benefit the pharmaceutical industry’s massive sales of chemotherapy drugs?

    If you call yourself a health organisation, then how about living up to the name instead of doing what looks very much like working to help big tobacco and big pharma?

    – Chris Price

    Comments

  • Rose Anderson
    24 November 2013

    I smoked for 40 years and tried inhalors, and patches in an attempt to give smoking up. They did not work for me. Pure desperation, drove me to try vaping 9 weeks ago. I have’nt had the urge to smoke since. My smokers cough and chestiness disappeared in a matter of days. My sense of smell and taste has improved dramatically and I can walk up the hill to my home, without stopping to catch my breath. I feel fitter than I have felt for years and vaping has saved my life. I have gradually lowered the nicotine strenght I’m using and intend to wean myself down to zero nicotine, then hopefully I can give up vaping, before our government tax it beyond my budget, as they are bound to do eventually. I will never go back to smoking as I’m enjoying being healthy for the first time, in a long time. I’m a 60 year old woman who is grateful that vaping has allowed me to get that cigarette monkey off ny back, when other methods failed. If vaping is banned, then many smokers who want to quit, won’t because something that does work, has been taken away from them. Smoking is a legal proven killer, the goverment should be banning them, but they won,t, because they want the huge taxes they pull in from tobacco products. Hippocrites, pure and simole.

  • troy McGinley
    12 November 2013

    I ve been a smoker for almost 20 years. Ecig helped me quit. I was able to ween myself off tobacco with the ability to select the nicotine doses . Now I just vape.. I m Nicotine free .
    I ve tried to quit smoking many times. Nothing worked. Quiting with Ecig was very easy.

  • Alan Beard
    9 November 2013

    Positive news stories and research studies are now quite a common occurrence (although lots of negative press also), what has been absent though has been Parliamentary debate at Westminster . This may be about to change as a number of MP are raising the subject eg Dr Sarah Wollaston in the Plain Packaging debate on 7/9/13 her position is highlighted in this excellent blog http://t.co/OSA0o3qsnZ .CR_UK we have repeatedly asked you to re-examine your position , are you going to attempt to lead or just merely follow ?
    I am afraid goodwill towards your organisation has either disappeared or is severely compromised by your illogical stance on e-cigs

  • Chris Knight
    4 November 2013

    OK, just read all the posts here and heres my humble and knowledgeable opinion.

    I am 71 and started smoking when i was 8 years old. Thats 63 years i have smoked. And yes i am still alive.

    One month ago, i tried a e cigarette whilst i was buying my twice weekly packet of 50 gramme rolling tobacco. I still have that packet, unopened and sat on my computer desk. I now only smoke e cigs and what a difference they have made to me. I still cough a little but only a fraction of what i used to. I breath much easier and my very eratic heart beat is rapidly stabalising to a modest 65 beats a minute.

    My sense of taste and smell has improved dramatically and i sleep much better. I feel so much better all round and have become more active. AND I NO LONGER CRAVE FOR TOBACCO SMOKE.

    Will i give up e cigs. Probably not, because after 63 years my body accepts nicotine. But i have given up smoking tobacco.

    So folks, for me E cigs are the bees knees. Hey, the way i am starting to feel health wise now i may even receive the queens ( or kings) telegram in 29 years time.

  • Mike Waxman (@MikeWaxman1)
    3 November 2013

    I’ll try again….

    I smoked from the age of 13. I am now 51. I have tried periodically over the years to give up, going cold turkey, using patches, hypnotherapy and prescribed zyban among other things. None have significantly worked.

    I came across e-cigarettes during an discussion on an online forum in July 2012. Based on the independent, unrequested info, I searched and was surprised to find a huge market out there.

    To cut a long story short, I bought a starter kit in August last year and, without putting myself under pressure to give up, started using it. Very quickly I smoked less ordinary cigarettes and in a matter of max 4 weeks, I found my 40-a-day habit cut to 3. In October of that year I smoked my last cigarette. I no longer liked the taste.

    It is now just over 12 months since I had a cigarette. And it’s all thanks to an electronic cigarette. My partner who smoked the same, if not more, than me is exactly the same.

    Both hardened smokers, I never for one second thought we would stop smoking. How wrong could I be.

    We now no longer have night-time or morning coughing fits (there is no doubt it is healthier!), we don’t stink …and we have more money in our pockets.

    If we could give up, anyone can. And anybody who tries to put a spoke in the wheels of this phenomenal invention can only have a hidden agenda. Shame on them!

  • Mike Waxman (@MikeWaxman1)
    3 November 2013

    Interesting – above post got through immediately …. yet my post explaining how 35+ year smoker has successfully given up through using e-cigs has still not made it.

  • Mike Waxman (@MikeWaxman1)
    3 November 2013

    Are posts here moderated? I’ve tried, now 3 times within last 24 hours, to post ….and nothing.

  • brainyfurball
    2 November 2013

    Alan: “ASH UK and CR UK could and should sort this out if they are to retain any future credibility and support from e-cig users/Vapers.”

    Now read… . http://www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_891.pdf Yes the tide is turning.. “The unanswered questions” – well ASH have answered one of them. Go to the factsheet everyone and you will get a very pleasant surprise.

    I cannot fathom the reason behind this. Could it be that the charities are in breach of the law by preventing something that benefits health for reasons other than heath reasons?

  • brainyfurball
    2 November 2013

    Marcy. So what if we do not know “how much nicotine” goes into an e cigarette. You really must try to keep up with scientific developments. I am no scientist but the information is so very easy to access if you cared to try. Nicotine, it is now being proposed, is probably only mildly addictive, and it is not nearly as toxic as first thought. How many of the millions of vapors can you identify as having given themselves nicotine poisoning – and I will give you another 10 years to answer because it will still be none.

    The nonsense you hear about ‘nicotine’ is as scary as an x rated horror movie, and just about as realistic.

  • p mccullagh
    27 October 2013

    the big man is just out for him self does not care how he tramps on now some one has took away his diner plate and he cant take it they have coned us for years hope ecigs take over they cant do as much harm as fags

  • Gordon Beard (@GordonAlanBeard)
    24 October 2013

    @marcy458

    I looked through your link , it certainly looks a well organised campaign group you have there, however without my wishing to cause arguments are you a grassroots organisation or are you funded by a larger organisation?.Whatever, your so called “scary” concerns are totally unfounded , responsible sellers batch test their e-liquid to ensure quality and samples tested and recorded. To make a comment of” not knowing whats in them ” is total nonsense typically its 3 or 4 nicotine, flavouring, PG /VG nothing more ALL products are well known and proven to be safe .

    You are erring on the side of caution , I wonder to what purpose and what are you actually advocating . I cannot speak for everyone who has contributed to this thread but we probably have ALL tried ineffective NRT and decided it’s not for us . What actually is the case is that we have discovered an enjoyable and relatively safe alternative to tobacco cigarettes that scaremongers,do-gooders cannot or will not recognise . Alternatively as is the case of some smoking cessation services they are starting to become concerned for their funding and ultimately employment. This is evidenced by the rate of increase in e-cig use( I quote UK only) Aug 2012 =700,000 April 2013 1.3 m Aug 2013 2m , ecig use has overtaken NRT recently .

    The main point of the thread .”.the unanswered questions”
    have been repeatedly answered by the users but still await the next response from CRUK.. I commend any reader to read this excellent article from a non-smoking(or vaping) government administrator who is involved in The Institute for Government http://api.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&key=bbb516d91daee20498798694a42dd559&loc=http%3A%2F%2Fallaboute-cigarettes.proboards.com%2Fthread%2F30639%2Fexcellent-article-govt-administrator%3Fpage%3D1%26scrollTo%3D549177&v=1&libId=8785384f-e311-4cb7-b86a-5baeb417b42b&out=http%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2FhfWEQ168RS&ref=http%3A%2F%2Fallaboute-cigarettes.proboards.com%2Fboard%2F25%2Fpromoting-campaigning-articles-vaping-media&title=Excellent%20Article%20From%20Govt%20Administrator%20%7C%20ALL%20ABOUT%20E-CIGARETTES%20UK&txt=t.co%2FhfWEQ168RS&jsonp=vglnk_jsonp_13825791075636

  • dave knox
    23 October 2013

    @ marcy458
    marcy I know perfectly well whats in my e – liquid because I mix it myself, in the uk as stated these liquids are covered by several consumer licenses that protect people from the kind of issue you are talking about,so to state we don’t know what chemicals are in e-liquid is a completely false statement picked up or copied from a propaganda statement read elsewhere if you did proper research on this subject maybe you could give more of a educated comment on it instead and understand it better..no offense meant..but just do more research before commenting it would do wonders for your credibility.

  • DAVE KNOX
    22 October 2013

    why don’t the so called medical professionals ask me and millions of others like me who used to smoke cigarettes and have switched over to a safer alternative for health reasons? the e-cigarette is a consumer led and consumer driven phenomenon and with no cost to government ? e-cigarettes are saving lives all around the world plus creating business and innovation at the same time. all the medical councils will do if they succeed in banning or making them require a medicinal license would be to force them underground and create the biggest black market the world has ever seen..now that is a very scary prospect and one the fake cloners and dubious make money quick merchants are closely monitoring. in the u.k as they stand e-cigarettes are covered by several consumer licenses that work very well in protecting the user of e-cigarettes and nothing more should be required. I agree slap a 18 certificate on them and deny them to teens of impressionable age but actually I would prefer my son or daughter to try one of these than actual cigarettes and I suppose in the real world I would prefer them to be saints and try nothing but that very rarely happens amongst the youth of today.
    i’m 63 now and after smoking for 50 years I think I have the knowledge and experience to talk on this matter since I switched to e-cigarettes my clothes my car my house my hair and skin don’t smell terrible any more and I finally realise the misery I caused through second hand smoke to my wife and friends and I am truly sorry for my thoughtlessness since I switched to the e-cigarette my breathing has improved drastically my blood oxygen has gone back to normal my taste has returned no wheezing no heartburn or acid reflux after three short months I feel better sleep better hell even my golf handicap came down to twelve my friends and family are over the moon and I have the satisfaction of knowing I will never smoke again this is a personal experience and one I’m sure is being mimicked all over the world so why don’t the medical people ask us for our opinion its free and doesn’t cost anything is it because they really believe that they know better? I don’t think so not on this subject. its time people woke up and smelt the coffee ( a nice e-cigarette flavour by the way) the e cigarette is here to stay and neither doom merchants /pharmaceuticals /tobacco companies /governments/medical councils or anybody else having a go are going to stop it ..the truth will out it always does

  • marcy458
    20 October 2013

    While one of the main arguments about tobacco cigs vs e-cigs is that it’s the tobacco that contains all the ‘cancer risk ingredients’ – don’t you think it’s a little bit scary that the FDA hasn’t regulated these devices – while some e-cig companies might be putting very little nicotine etc some may be doing the opposite. At the moment, with zero regulation – it’s not actually known what chemicals and ingredients are in e-liquids. That’s a concern…

    We would like to know your thoughts on this topic, and welcome everyone to our page:
    http://switchoffecigarettes.wordpress.com/

  • mark
    15 October 2013

    E-cigs are the best invention of the 21st century.
    The inventor deserves the noble peace prize, so please don’t talk **** to me about how bad they are for users because my health has improved 10 fold due to switching to e-cigs.
    In fact i suffered from OCD for years and since being on ecigs, that has disappeared completely.
    This stuff is miraculous!

  • Kieron kelly
    14 October 2013

    What utter rubbish apart from the very bad English which makes mine look good and I’m dyslexic where is there any evidence to back up this twaddle

  • Cheap E Cigarette
    14 October 2013

    I would like to comment on who are the user of e cigarette and why?
    People who are using real cigarette are main user of e cigarette. They are trying to stop smoking by using e cigarette. People think that e cigarette is safe then real cigarette because it is not contain toxic. It is giving feeling that you are using real cigarette so you don’t want real cigarette.
    But other part of e cigarette use is, Children are starting using e cigarette. This is not for them, but still they are using it and companies also target them for advertisement.
    https://www.facebook.com/Steamlite

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    14 October 2013

    Hate to burst your bubble but compared with 4000 ingredients which are killers to 4 ingredients in an e-cigarette which aren’t killers, you have no argument. Newsflash, the tobacco industry has ALWAYS targeted 11-15 year olds, this way they get children hooked and keep them for life…as short as it may be, they have a lifelong customer. Electronic Cigarettes are not intended as a quit smoking device, it is an alternative method for getting a nicotine fix for those of us who are addicted to nicotine but are not impressed with formaldehyde, cyanide and carbon monoxide!

  • Alan Beard
    11 October 2013

    Well said Gary , the Public perception of e-cigarettes is governed by the press they receive whether TV or newspapers . Until very recently (days) virtually every single news or press item was really negative with few balanced reports .

    There is a massive Tobacco Control Industry who successfully have manipulated the press to suit their ends, unfortunately we are lumped in with this campaign of scepticism and disinformation designed to discredit.

    When have we read in the Main National Press the positive studies that have emerged showing that e-cigarettes pose reduced harm to the user ?,

    ASH UK and CR UK could and should sort this out if they are to retain any future credibility and support from e-cig users/Vapers. It really is not too late to revert to your 2008 position where you were welcoming alternative nicotine delivery methods freely available with minimal safeguards and restrictions.

  • Gary
    11 October 2013

    A slightly related subject, cigarettes only get worse for you as the years go by. They add new chemicals to “prevent house fires”(fsc) or create better flavors. With this increase in chemical intake, quitting my 10 year long habit has only become more dire. I had used Ecigs in the past and only discriminated against them because in my head they were “electronic cigarettes.” In reality they are not, like many others have stated the Ecig is an “ENDS.” After giving up on the idea that they were just electronic versions of a cigarette i was able to get past my prejudice towards the product and embrace it. Now because of my amazing girlfriend i am the proud owner of my own Ecig and have been smoke free for 6 days. Its not significant but its a start and i feel as though people need to get over the simple misconceptions regarding this product. Its liquid nicotine, its not killing anybody so let it be. Any and all concerns should be addressed to our Gov. that so willingly allows products like Tobacco and Alcohol to be sold over the counter with hundreds of thousands of people dying from them every year – Just a random rant

  • Ronald
    9 October 2013

    It has been very impressive guide so far on E-Cigarattes. Even, I also think that before 5 years ago E-cigrattes are not so popular. But, now lots of peopel use this. The main reason to use E-cigratte is less harmful and less nicotin.

  • Victoria
    9 October 2013

    I have been a smoker for over 16 years; mostly due to the addiction of cigarettes thought. I recently started to ‘vap’ and I have not bought a pack of cigarettes since then. I really feel that due to the tobacco companies no longer getting my money is the reason surrounding so much controversy. It is clearly a harm reduction, since it works. I personally don’t ‘vap’ in a public building or around children as I respect the choice of others. I enjoy to vap and I don’t want it to be regulated as I don’t want to give the government anymore of my finances.

  • brainyfurball
    8 October 2013

    YES!

    http://ecigarette-research.com/web/index.php/2013-04-07-09-50-07/133-a-triumph-for-vapers-smokers?fb_action_ids=239457522872673&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%5B1422997987918994%5D&action_type_map=%5B%22og.likes%22%5D&action_ref_map=%5B%5D

  • 7 October 2013

    Hi
    Yes I think they should be some regulation on e-liquids but please don’t make a decision that will kill the development of this product and others that may come along.( people will always smoke better a safe way then what we smoke now)

    I am a smoker and have been for last 30 years, I have tried meany things in the past that have not worked this dose work. Yes I may not give up the e- cigarette but this is better for me and anyone around me when I am using a e-cigarette. I feel healthier without havering to go throughout withdrawal that stops most people giving up. Also remember you lot remember the majority not the minority when making your decision.
    The other thing thIs e-cigarette will save millions of live and if giving time and development I believe will in time would replace the cigarette altogether.

    Using e- cigarette will also save lives in other indirect ways as will, less house and bush fires as no lighted cigarette left or disgraced out of car windows etc.
    Give this one a chance they have the backing of smokers wold wide use this to make the tobacco industry into making a safer

  • brainyfurball
    6 October 2013

    Here is another unanswered question. It is becoming more and more obvious that e cigarettes beneficial in the war against smoking. Indeed, they are the most exciting development ever to have taken place. Is the silence of our medical practitioners further evidence of a powerful bullying culture inherent in health services?

  • brainyfurball
    3 October 2013

    Keep it up folks. We still have a long way to go but…. http://www.clivebates.com/?p=1526#more-1526

  • johnpeeter00
    3 October 2013

    safe regulation of ingredients (but not the nicotine strength or choice of flavours) and ensuring responsible marketing aimed at adults only (perhaps a ban on the e-cigs that look like a cigarette wouldn’t hurt – my e-cig looks nothing like a ‘real’ ciggie: stainless steel battery case and clear polycarbonate juice atomiser) should be all that is needed to save millions of lives and billions of pounds of burden on the NHS,

    electronic cigarettes

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    3 October 2013

    Exactly, well said

  • virginiaworld
    27 September 2013

    this is all a crock of crap……there are no carcinogens in the liquid that I vape! They arent harmful….and dont pollute the air. Guess what? I smoked for over 20 years & up to almost 2 packs a day! I was also taking daily asthma medication, using a rescue inhaler twice a day & breathing treatments 3 times a week. Not only have I been COMPLETELY smoke free for over two years… my breathing is ALOT better. I no longer need breathing treatments nor do I take daily asthma medication. I only take a rescue inhaler once in awhile when my allergies act up & thats it! People are making the switch & the politicians, tobacco companies & healthcare companies arent getting as much money. Therefore they have to demonize e-cigs & attack that market so that they seem as if they are doing good for the people when they ban them in public places & fill their pockets with new tax money http://www.cigarettespub.net/!

  • robert innes
    26 September 2013

    I will focus on ONE word in the report..” formaldehyde.” You claim this substance was found in an e cigarette…WRONG! The substance was found during research of the e cigarette. What is the difference,? It is this.

    The air was tested BEFORE the e cigarette was used and formaldehyde was detected. As the experiment progressed there was a tiny rise in the amount being observed. It is possible that the e cigarette contributed further to this infinitesimal amount

    The report STATES quite clearly that this substance was probably being produced by the subject himself and NOT being produced by the e cigarette. It is also possible that some was produced by the heating element but none is contained in the liquid. It is known that we do produce the substance ourselves and it is exhaled by us so that is the probable source.

    This scare story has long been discredited and yet here you are parroting – turning out the same old garbage. You must either be trying to deceive your readers or you are failing to do the proper groundwork that a topic of this importance deserves.

    For light reading and a good laugh go to… http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2402108/E-cigarettes-harmful-cigarettes-cause-cancer-claims-study.html (You will note the similarities here to your own document)

    To read what a REAL expert has to say about some of the supposed dangers, read…
    http://vaperanks.com/new-study-shows-electronic-cigarettes-have-no-short-term-adverse-effects-on-coronary-microcirculation/

    And finally can you explain the reasons for CRUK’s complete about turn on the issue of Nicotine delivery devices such as the e cigarette. Is it because in 2008 they had not been recognised as a commercial and financial threat? Back then you, and many, many other pharma linked organisations were complaining that the then NRT products had a weakness – they did not mimic cigarette smoking. You were complaining that medical regulation was strangling innovation and development and were demanding tax breaks. You were complaining that nicotine product WERE NOT ATTRACTIVE ENOUGH TO SMOKERS.. That and much, much more.

    Don’t believe me? Here you are..

    Chapter 8 Alternatives to smoking.

    Develop a strategy and an appropriate regulatory structure to improve the acceptability, attractiveness and accessibility of pure nicotine products for use as an alternative to smoking for those who are currently unable or unwilling to quit.

    Encourage commercial development of pure nicotine products designed for long-term use as a replacement for smoking.

    Develop a communications strategy to counter public misunderstanding of the health impacts of nicotine. This should promote nicotine replacement therapy for quitting and encourage the longer term use of pure nicotine products as alternatives to tobacco.

    Tax pure nicotine products at the lowest rate of VAT.

    Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of providing pure nicotine products free on prescription to smokers
    for as long as they are unable or unwilling to quit.

    Increase investment in research into the long-term impacts of nicotine.

    NOTE:” Pure nicotine products are products which, like the current medicinal products on the market, contain only
    nicotine and not other tobacco derivatives and which offer heavily addicted smokers the rewards of nicotine
    at a greatly reduced health risk.” So e cigarettes DO fall under this definition, except that they are not medicinal.

    http://www.ash.org.uk/beyondsmokingkills

    Note also the organisations which endorsed this document…. Perfect hypocrisy!

  • RobbieW
    24 September 2013

    “Costs and burdens of medicines regulation for e – cigarettes”

    Very informative report by eminent individuals ( Clive Bates & professor Gerry Stimson ) here;

    http://nicotinepolicy.net/documents/reports/Impacts%20of%20medicines%20regulation%20-%2020-09-2013.pdf

    Their conclusions;

    We conclude that medicines regulation for e-cigarettes will:

    Destroy the existing supply chain and most businesses
    Create a de facto ban on most products
    Make e-cigarettes harder to buy than tobacco cigarettes
    Favour the cigarette industry
    Induce significant legal risk
    Create high and unnecessary barriers to entry for firms and products.

    In short, medicines regulation focuses on creating a better medicinal product, whereas the public health is served by having better alternatives to cigarettes.

    With such views coming from people with such impeccable credentials it is indefensible for CRUK to remain silent and maintain a position that will cause many thousands of deaths.

    ALL EXISTING PRODUCTS WILL BE BANNED.

    CRUK, stop and think, do the right thing

  • Anthony
    17 September 2013

    I am approaching my 1 year anniversary of quitting smoking due to my E-Cig on 9/21/13!! I love them and have recommended them to many family and friends and they (not all) but most have quit smoking like me! The amount of chemicals in E Cigs dont even come slightly close to the chemicals in cigarettes and therefore are definitely a win win, the university at Boston did a study on them and they said there isn’t anything harmful about them. I agree the regulation of nicotine should for sure be regulated but all in all they are effective if you want to quit smoking, even if they help you to cut down drastically as many have that is still a huge improvement by far. I feel once the FDA does regulate them as a “quit smoking aid” instead of a “tobacco product” since they are not, then we will all be aware of the significant reward of being able to quit smoking and use a harmless vapor E-cig. The liquid is also available in “0” nicotine giving people the option to just have something to vape on for the effect of smoking, I am behind them 100%, leave them alone and dont pick on something that is doing people good like me!!

  • Richardo
    4 September 2013

    Also you must see the advantage the big cigarette companies have if these are regulated. Don’t allow them to regulate them. If they are regulated we are guaranteed a product made by companies that have no regard to public health. Allow E cigarettes to be regulated by the free market. The most healthy effective alternatives will prevail.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EZB447U

  • Glenn Turner
    3 September 2013

    After being a tobacco smoker for over 25 years, I have now been tobacco free for almost a month thanks to making the switch to e-cigs.

    This is my first and only proper attempt at kicking the habit – the motivation being a close friend being diagnosed with throat cancer , which is most likely down to his 30 a day, 40 year habit.

    The prospect of going cold turkey and my admittedly very weak self willpower have always hindered me achieving the single biggest health improvement I could make – but having the e-cig has made it unbelieveably easy to do.

    I made a clean break, e-cig arrived on a Monday and the tobacco I had left went down the bog the same day – I have absolutely no regrets at all, I don’t miss tobacco at all. I can regulate my nicotine intake and ultimately aim to be nicotine free in time, but till then my e-cig fills a void that patches and gum could never ever achieve for me personally, I don’t feel the need to comfort eat and it hasn’t impacted my life socially (I don’t feel I have to avoid situations where I would be in contact with firends and colleagues who still use tobacco as the temptation to have a ciggie just isn’t there any more) which has also made the change easier.

    Heavy handed regulation on availability, choice and interference from tobacco companies could have the potential to so easily undo what it has taken me quarter of a century to achieve.

    Safe regulation of ingredients (but not the nicotine strength or choice of flavours) and ensuring responsible marketing aimed at adults only (perhaps a ban on the e-cigs that look like a cigarette wouldn’t hurt – my e-cig looks nothing like a ‘real’ ciggie: stainless steel battery case and clear polycarbonate juice atomiser) should be all that is needed to save millions of lives and billions of pounds of burden on the NHS.

    My only real concern is that sooner or later the government will ultimately tax e-cigs so hard to make up for lost revenue from tobacco products – hopefully i’ll be nic free by then, but for future tobacco quitters it could be a real disincentive to make the best decision of their lives.

  • portable vaporizers
    3 September 2013

    e-cigs are the best smoking alternative that donot contain bad ingredients in it.

  • Jerry Smith
    2 September 2013

    Well e-cig is an option for those who is addicted to traditional smoking and wants to quit it completely.Then e-cig can be the first step to achieve it,though e-cig is also not beneficial for health but yes it is comparatively less harmful than traditional cig…

  • Reyrey
    2 September 2013

    It’s really a great and helpful piece of info. I’m satisfied that you simply shared this useful information with us. Please stay us up to date like this. Thank you for sharing.

  • Vape@e-cigarette Joyetech
    31 August 2013

    Read the article of 60 000 000 of consommateurs in france

  • Cristian
    28 August 2013

    First: http://www.utahvapers.com/clearstream.html

    Secondly, I notice that some people mention that the E-cigs still contain nicotine.
    Based on my limited knowledge, nicotine is produced by the brain, and it exist in every non-smoker out there.
    The addiction kicks in when the brain notices that nicotine production is no longer required, and stops creating it.
    Thus withdrawal is the period when your brain must get used to creat nicotine again.

    Nicotine is not harmfull (as far as I know and already mentioned).
    Everything that is harmfull is all the other hundreds of toxines existing in regular cigarettes.

    Based on all REAL facts out there(as the upped link provided), and my period as an e-smoker, I`ll stick to that.
    It`s better in every way than the regular cigarette.

  • Eddy - Optimacigs.com
    27 August 2013

    Sensation provided by traditional cigarettes can now be easily obtained from the electronic cigarette. Everyone can get it easily without worrying about health and disease that can come from smoking traditional cigarettes suddenly.

  • Shrey Seonerds
    27 August 2013

    Undoubtedly Lack of taboco makes e-cig less harmful but at the same time their is no strict regulation on sales of e-cig and also what other chemical it has is also not opened up by the companies.So their should be some strict regulations all over the world.

  • Darren
    18 August 2013

    Although there isn’t conclusive evidence on ecigs but at least we know ecigs do not contain all the harmful stuff a tobacco ciggy has, so one thing is for sure that ecigs are a healthier alternative

  • Ralph
    15 August 2013

    I’ve been a hard smoker for 35 years and started using E-cigarettes a month ago. I had severe breathing difficulties and couldn’t do much of anything when it came to physical exercise. The E-cigarettes have helped me in more ways than I can put into words. I can now breathe better and I am sleeping well at nights, something which I didn’t do when smoking. The only thing that worries me is our greedy, criminal governments who will want to try and recuperate their loss in revenue, due to so many turning to the E-cigarette. They just cannot keep their avarice hands out of people’s lives. The big corporations are what owns and controls our governments, so look out for huge numbers of research papers the government put out on these e-cigarettes, because they will all demonize this new and cheaper way of smoking. They will find a way to tax it so they can have their huge piece of the pie. Mind you, I have to thank the government for continuously taxing tobacco over the years and making it too expensive for people to smoke. Without their greed we may not have had the creation of the e-cigarette and I would be on my way to the morgue. I don’t care what excuse the government come out with, as far as I’m concerned e-cigarettes have saved my life.

  • gvnmcknz
    15 August 2013

    What are the risks associated with the liquids used to carry the nicotine?
    My wife is now on 0mg nicotine cartomisers.
    Are there any remaining health risks, how pure are the liquids, do the flavourings represent a risk?
    She feels the Menthol flavoured ones make her tongue “sting”.
    Perhaps there should be some published product comparisons.
    Regards
    gvnmcknz

  • Dampguiden
    13 August 2013

    E-cigarettes are the future, no doubt about that. The only question is whether it’ll be a domestic semi-illegal product, forcing users to buy from unregulated foreign vendors or if the government will open their eyes and allow for a free but regulated market

  • Chris Bell
    20 July 2013

    It Is this simple. Governments, the tobacco industry and pharmaceutical companies are losing revenue because of the increasing worldwide use of e-cigs and they are all trying to figure out a way to financially benefit from this little electronic saviour . But it is a drug delivery device (nicotine) and needs to be regulated and classified as a medical device. Yes, and so is a tea pot along with countless other unregulated items, most commonly consumed vegetables, for instance. Get real. You, as in the above mentioned are perfectly happy to continue reaping the massive revenue gained from LETHAL tobacco products and still allow them to be freely available for consumption, knowing the very serious health risks and accepting the utter misery and premature death that will be bestowed upon millions of people. Have a word with the Swedish Governments Health Department reference: Their drug delivery device. How many lives it has saved. The outstanding reduction in cancers and other tobacco related illnesses. They have over thirty years of science on the subject. We also could have had that information but you banned its use throughout the rest of Europe. It all comes down to MONEY and GREED. Happy vaping people. Oh! By the way it is really simple to make your own e-liquid.

  • lucy taylor
    18 July 2013

    My husband has been using e-cigs for only 3 days and is already a convert. From smoking 25 cigarettes a day for the last 30 years, he has now gone down to nil in 3 days! These things may not be perfect but they’ve got to be a whole lot better than cigarettes, so could the precious people out there please get a reality check?!

  • Kieron
    12 July 2013

    Love what you put Linda x

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    12 July 2013

    Thanks Kieron, it just had to be said xx

  • Kieron
    12 July 2013

    James T have you ever been a smoker! What dribble( I’m being polite feel free to put a more descriptive word in if you like) please show me your evidence that ecigs are bad for you. Also why not publish your ground breaking ideas on how people can quit the evil weed.

  • James T
    12 July 2013

    Smoking is terrible for your health and e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products are no good either. You just need to ignore the craving for 5 minutes before it goes away. Occupy yourselves with another behaviour that is health and you won’t even need to think about smoking. Take up a new hobby that keeps you busy and get a good support network around you. Sometimes it is not as hard as you think. For most people they just keep making excuses as to why they dont want to quit. Give it a go and committ to it… seriously, you’re life is at risk if you don’t and smoking is no longer seen as cool or tough. Get over it!

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    12 July 2013

    James T, when did you arrive from Mars and do NASA know of your existence?

    Just stop and after 5 minutes the cravings will go away, you are definitely from a different planet – Try tell an alcohol, “oh just don’t have another drink, start collecting stamps instead”, tell a drug addict “don’t have anymore drugs, go walking in the fresh air”…you obviously have never smoked, never vaped and have absolutely no concept of the word “addiction”, we vapers are addicted to nicotine, and I for one love my addiction, I don’t want to stop vaping but I did want to stop smoking – tobacco cigarettes have 4000 chemicals in them, when they are lit they become 4800 lethal, toxic and poisonous chemicals and the mutations of the 4800 lethal, toxic and poisonous chemicals then mutate into countless millions of other chemicals. Vaping was never, ever intended to stop people quitting! Get that in your head first. Secondly, it is purely by default because the electronic cigarette is so effective it has allowed people to be able to quit. It’s acronym is ENDS – Electronic Nicotine Delivery System. Not a Quit Smoking Device!! Hop back on your space ship, get out a pen and start writing about the human race!

  • Gina Conti
    9 July 2013

    I support smoking E-cigarettes over a normal cigarette but I do not claim them to be healthy. I know as a smoker that we need to do more studies on the long term effects of e-cigarettes before we go claiming it as some great alternative.

  • kieron kelly
    8 July 2013

    I read this article with interest . I started smoking at 14 and have many failed attempts at quitting the longest period I managed was 18 months. I now use a vaporiser and have never looked back. I’m not alone loads of my friends have switched too. I cant understand this negativity towards them I for one dread the government getting involved in regulating E liquids as I can see the strength being capped at a ridiculously low level and the price going through the rooof

  • Robert Reid
    5 July 2013

    How very true Fergus. I’ve spent well over a year researching these products and because I’ve been vaping e-cigarettes that long and will continue to do so, I will never stop learning. There is absolutely no point whatsoever in trying to put down electronic cigarettes. In the 7 years or so that they have been on sale they have, albeit not intentionally, allowed people to do what NRT’s have been unable to do and that is to quit tobacco cigarettes. Nicotine addiction…what a laugh, it’s not just in tomatoes, it is in staple foods such as potatoes, aubergines, mushrooms, cauliflowers, peppers, cappsicums and that list goes on and on! I have no quota to meet, and whether my post here is grammatically correct or not, my point is, these products work, whether it be for people to want to reduce their nicotine level to zero and use an e-cig as a physical device until they get out of the habit, or whether they want to vape 36mg of nicotine in their e-liquid, because they want to. We have rights too, just like smokers do! An issue yet to be tackled, take a look at the real problem – start with tobacco cigarettes and then go on to the deadly aspartame (aka sweetener), which has to date killed 180,000 people vs. deaths from nicotine – NONE!!

  • Fergus Mason
    5 July 2013

    “In fact, it should be studied first the effects of smoking e-cigarettes.”

    You’re not a native English speaker, are you, “Bernard”? In fact you were paid to write comments attacking electronic cigarettes, weren’t you? I’m a freelance writer and I know exactly how often this happens. Your comment – simplistic, ungrammatical and riddled with errors as it is – shows all the signs of a Bangladeshi freelancer trying to meet his quota of 1,000 blog comments a day.

  • Fergus Mason
    5 July 2013

    “I feel that while an E-cigarette could help some people quit, it can also make others smoke more.”

    Except all the evidence from every study shows exacly the opposite – smokers who start using an e-cigarette smoke LESS.

    “These people can now smoke inside without the dangers of second hand smoke.”

    No, they can’t. Smoking inside remains illegal.

    “Also if they were truly good for people there would be no nicotine in them.”

    They’re not good for people and nobody ever claimed they were; what’s being claimed – accurately – is that they’re less harmful than smoking is. Nicotine isn’t a problem anyway. It’s no worse for you than caffeine is, which is just as well seeing as most vegetables contain it.

  • Vincent Jones
    3 July 2013

    I think that E-cigarettes need a lot more testing before people go claiming that they are “healthy” or a way to quit smoking. We need more information.

  • Dale
    2 July 2013

    I feel that while an E-cigarette could help some people quit, it can also make others smoke more. For example people who only smoke outside so that the smoke doesn’t “harm” anyone else. These people can now smoke inside without the dangers of second hand smoke. Thus giving them more time to smoke. Also if they were truly good for people there would be no nicotine in them.

  • Electronic cigarettes
    25 June 2013

    These products have helped the UK government hit there smoking reduction targets far earlier that set AND without any cost to the tax payer. I can not understand why there is not more positive support for this product. Where is the evidence of defective products? you mean someone’s electronic cigarette broke and they had to buy a new one? So we should ban the whole industry?!?! All these points against electronic cigarettes are purely laughable.

  • Gordon Beard
    18 June 2013

    As Deborah Arnott of ASH has stated (repeating very eminent scientists position) nicotine is addictive BUT not harmful.

    The position of current NRT policy seems to recognise that long term use is a possible course of action that can be used. .

    From Smoke in England studies ASH’s own data is clearly showing that the 1.3 million current e-cig users are having success at their attempt to cease smoking tobacco cigarettes ASH quoted (out of date stat.) that 20% of users had quit smoking long term by using e-cigs( now 30% min.)

    30% long term quit rate compares very favourably with regulated NRT figures of 5-7%

    BUT for one moment I wish to revisit nicotine , many ideologists in tobacco control do not consider that an e-cig user has quit (even though have stopped smoking tobacco) until they are nicotine abstinent.

    The task of prohibition of nicotine is an impossible one why cannot the followers of this ideology focus their attentions power and influence onto the real killer -tobacco cigarettes. This is the 21st century not the middle-ages lets have reason, debate and find solutions as promoted in Singapore where the population was consulted about how to reduce Smoking tobacco – not bans or excessive regulation .

    Since e-cigs started to gain some popularity since 2007 there has been no evidence of death/injury that could be placed . So 6 years have gone by in a rapidly changing expanding market with no known harm .

    Others far more qualified and eloquent than I could state my case far clearer but I simply wish to put the case for tightening of current regulations not for a “light” or “right touch” medical regulation which will result in a totally unjustified restriction in availability of life saving products .

  • Susan Wilson
    16 June 2013

    I stopped smoking cigarettes myself 10 months ago by using e-gigs. I have not had a single tobacco cigarette in that time and indeed found that whenever I felt the need for a cigarette and used an E-cig my craving was satisfied. I have attempted many times to stop smoking but always started again. I even used a drug called “Champix” prescribed (twice) by my GP and although I had a few months of cessation I went back to cigarettes. I feel so much healthier and also happier as I don’t feel the guilt of smoking tobacco. My friends and family are also much happier and indeed some friends have followed me into the vaping of E-cigs and feel better for it. I also smell sweeter and am fitter since giving up the weed that is tobacco. If E-cigs are banned or difficult to purchase I’d most certainly start smoking again.. How can banning them or even taxing them like tobacco products are be a good thing?

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    16 June 2013

    Susan and Dodderer – spot on, in our blog post http://www.cool-breeze-e-cigs.com/e-cigarettes-are-the-future/ we are asking some very probing questions regarding the WHO’s stance (World Health Organisation) on electronic cigarettes and why the need to re-classify and what they really want, ban them! Why, if there is going to be a ban why not ban tobacco cigarettes, which kills someone every 5 minutes! We, the people who have smoked and those who are looking for alternative, cleaner, safer methods to smoke ie. vaping, should know these things, they should know the corruption within the tobacco industries, the pharmaceutical companies and the back pockets of many a head of state. These people are mapping out our lives for us and it is we, the general public who have the ultimate say. I will not be forced back on to cigarettes, I will not accept the electronic cigarette as a medicinal device as I am not ill, I do not want to quit my nicotine, I want to quit all the other 3999 ingredients which are toxic and potentially lethal, and why don’t I have that right….because the rich will be less well off, tough, our lives mean more to us than your fat cat way of living, deal with it, don’t label us and put us in a NRT club, a “they have to be stopped” club, get on with your own lives, invest your billions into something else, like World Health, and stop telling us how we can live our lives.

  • Dodderer
    13 June 2013

    The rise of ecigs poses many awkward questions:

    why,after 5 years on the market,do we know nothing about them?

    why have they been so successful?

    does the ineffectiveness of NRT pose more of a threat to public health than a benefit?

    is not the reward to risk ratio so great that they should be encouraged?

    what actual problems have arisen that require pre-emptive action?

    With no balancing voice to Tobacco Control policies,mistakes will not be identified or rectified.Our lives are at stake – theory,opinion and academic research is not helping us.

  • reply
    Linda Reid
    15 June 2013

    The fact is that electronic cigarettes are here to stay. The reason is simple, smokers are fed up with high prices and constant in your face guilt tripping. When you look at the shocking failure rate of current NRT, and consider that NRT is priced to cost MORE than smoking, it is no wonder that many smokers are taking a gamble on e-cigs and vaping.
    In the UK, using an electronic cigarette to deliver your required nicotine fix costs just 5% of the price of smoking tobacco. Given that smoking tobacco is PROVEN to Kill you and shorten your life, and so far in 5 years over 5million smokers have switched to vaping with no reported deaths, what would you do?
    The problem arises when e-cigarette companies target or sell to non smokers, especially the young. Can anyone show that under 25’s who try an electronic cigarette would not have tried a tobacco cigarette?
    It is a shame that no one has the balls to ban tobacco cigarettes, and prescribe every smoker an e-cigarette.
    The main fact is that the risk of electronic cigarettes being more harmful than tobacco smoking is one that vapers are happy to take!

  • PAUL
    12 June 2013

    I will not buy a big tobacco or big pharma made product. If all the mom and pop vape shops are pushed out of business by the government (for the people my ass) or big tobacco, I will find a way to buy ingredients from China or the like manufacture e liquid myself. The real issue here is that my 4-5 dollar a day black and mild habit has been reduced to a 1 dollar or less vape habit. Multiply my 3 or so dollars a day habit by a million and you see the loss to government coffers and shareholder earnings. I believe this is why the over the counter made to look like the real thing e cigarrettes are absolute garbage (short battery and vaping time, pack says equivalent to 200 cigarettes- utter bullshit) and more expensive then real cigarrettes.

  • Chris Price
    6 June 2013

    Not sure why nicotine dependence is a ‘problem’? I doubt if you would see your coffee or tea dependence as a problem. Nicotine has about the same implications for health as coffee. It’s near enough harmless unless you have some form of genetic issue. Unlike caffeine or alcohol, nicotine is a normal and natural part of the diet, and everyone tests positive for it. It is hardly a ‘problem’.

    The main ‘problem’ is that most people think that nicotine is a problem. Nicotine is more normal to consume than other similar materials, everyone tests positive for it, and it is unlikely to be dependence-forming unless first supplied in tobacco smoke. The nicotine in tobacco smoke is about one-millionth as harmful as the smoke.

  • David Edwards Insurance
    6 June 2013

    I think that people using e-cigarettes as a healthier choice is a good thing to start with but the fact that they still addicted to the nicotine is the problem.

  • reply
    Robert Reid
    6 June 2013

    Can I just reiterate what Chris Price has said. Everyone does test positive for nicotine and if they don’t they’d be quite ill. As it is a naturally occurring chemical, it is a lot of our every day foods. Potatoes, a staple diet throughout the world. Aubergines = extremely high in nicotine and it is important to remember that the nicotine only dissipates slightly when cooked. Some more, cappsicums, chillis, cauliflower, mushrooms.

    Also, it has been proven throughout the world that NRT has a success rate of less than 10%…the electronic cigarette was not intended to help people quit and it is still a grey area as far as advertising is concerned. It is an Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS), some people have used the electronic cigarette and reduced the level of nicotine they use/inhale, what’s bad about that, also it is a well known fact that a hit of nicotine, makes your brain more receptive, more productive…as Chris Price says, isn’t that what people crave when they want a cup of tea or coffee – what next an outlaw on that too? What people should really be taking a very close look at is how the hell aspartame was ever passed by the FDA in the US….now it’s here and has been for years, making people ill, depressed, overweight, it’s crazy now that is what I call a drug and it’s not a naturally occurring one either

  • Liz
    4 June 2013

    I am a regular vapor (12mg nic tobacco flavour) I prefer to use a cartomiser rather than a product that is designed to look like a cigarette. This is because I am an ex smoker and prefer to distance myself from something that has killed millions and also blighted the life’s of many more. Also I think that calling it an ECig perpetuates the myth that you are addicted to cigarettes. It’s the nicotine that is addictive rather than all the other chemicals in cigarettes. As an ex smoker myself (13-51 years) I think I am able to comment on why vaping is much healthier, even if long term studies are still ongoing. My blood pressure has returned to normal 115/80, my pulse rate is now 72 after being above 100 for several years. I don’t ‘hack’ up every morning or use an inhaler (which also contains propyl glycanol BTW). My skin in now rosy rather than grey and I don’t stink like the bottom of an ashtray! I think there should be legislation but only so far as ensuring consumers are able to trust the quality of the product they choose and the integrity of their suppliers. I also think they should only be available to over 18’s as you are then able to make an informed choice yourself. I did extensive research before I decided to change my life (and better my health) forever. There are numerous websites, bloggs and forums out there, but beware, don’t forget that everybody has their own agenda. An excellent source of up to date information and research is being carried out by https://www.facebook.com/konstantinos.farsalinos. He is a Doctor based in Greece. He seems to be one of the few who are actually looking at it objectively. As a free thinking, but not very scientific adult, I find it bizarre that Democratically elected governments are choosing to ban something that has not been proven to harm the individual or anyone else in close proximity to them. Surely the miriad of known harmful effects of smoking, alcohol and sugar should worry them more.

  • Bernard I. Fowler
    4 June 2013

    I think that e-cigarettes are not safe because they contain nicotine! Manufacturers say they are safe in order to attract customers. In fact, it should be studied first the effects of smoking e-cigarettes.

  • debp
    3 June 2013

    Do u think e – e-cigarette could be the solution for the as an alternative for hard smoker .. you can monitor your nicotine level with the time if you change dose .. one you may end up with nonsmoker .. if so I am exited to use it.

  • katie
    1 June 2013

    I am a e-cigarette user an I can not speak for all who use them but in my case an many more I have stopped smoking I had my last cigarette 2 months ago me an my children are breathing better have not been sick I can walk more an longer then I could when smoking I have no trouble running up an down stairs all day at work I smell better things taste better I started vaping a 24 mg of nic I have worked my way down to a 12 mg an plan to keep stepping down on nic levels till I no longer need to use the ecig at all I started smoking at age 13 im now 30 I have tried several other ways to stop smoking gum patches pills stopping cold turkey nothing worked for me till I bought a ecig now I feel healthier an im also very proud of my self an my kids are proud of me too an that means the world to me

  • Sarah Kaufman
    1 June 2013

    Electronic cigarettes are many in the market, but to find the one brand or type that is the best electronic cigarette among many good ones requires some prior knowledge about the product.

  • Frank Lee
    31 May 2013

    tobacco giants invented the earliest known e-cigarette as far back as 1998. it will inevitably fall to them to market and promote the products as is quickly becoming evident.

    Brand recognition in wider marketing will therefore become commonplace and probability does suggest e-cigarettes would be used to additional advantage.

    their regulation is seemingly something which most advocates actively promote even if by prevarication and often while in denial.

    it would appear that where a majority of e-cigarette users too do in effect desire degree of regulation, terms of which are being inadequately designed by those duly able and coordinated. the implications of the current approach is akin to the early establishment and onset of tobacco, with safety playing second fiddle to profit.

    decisions could perhaps be in much better hands.

    the e-cigarette if wisely regulated and accurately monitered, might ultimately prove itself to be the saviour which many have placed their faith in, but it would be quite naive to forget how their relative infancy detracts from ample long term study.

    added anomaly lies in the consumer association for UK e-cigarette users, and its negatively charged approach to information and wider promotion of e-cigarettes. their habits do appear to be undergoing slight alteration presently, but message taught to their previous audience, made for truly grim reading. it leaves little wonder why many e-cigarette consumers now fear hint mention or suggestion of any external regulation, and often lends root to passionate defense and confrontation.

    summing up my points, it is already a huge potential industry and stakes are high and vast. regulation is inevitable but also necessary. having played witness to current underhandedness, i feel future development is inevitable. early, wise, external regulation and policing, might at least confine opportunism.

  • Gordon Beard (@GordonAlanBeard)
    31 May 2013

    After reading this article I was about to write a reply , but lo and behold the first reply contained the very sentiments I was about to put(less eloquently though)

    I simply fail to understand the negativity of the writer and Cancer Research in general towards Harm Reduction .We can all quote statistics but one fact from ASH … there are now 1.3 million e-cig users

    In theses tough times are we really saying that 1.3 million(up from about 750,000 early 2012) have been duped into wasting their money and converted to e-cigs by deception and delusion .

    In all retail aspects of life people vote with their feet .. they can see it is working for them over the frankly useless NRT .and as long as any proposed regulation is not too draconian users will top 2 million at least by end 2014 .

    Research exists if you care to look for it that is detailed scientific independent study , much of the problem exists where studies are sponsored or supported by Big T or Big P.-outcomes have the possibility of being pre-determined

    As Chris suggested above why don’t you sponsor a detailed independent study with the potential of helping to save hundreds of thousands of tobacco smokers lives every year

  • Robert Monroe
    31 May 2013

    The other comments could not have been put any better. There are significant advantages to eliminating tobacco, tar, and smoke consumption. How people perceive e-cigarettes really is a matter of their independent view. Some people do see them as a platform to begin the process of quitting tobacco smoking. Some people still want nicotine and e-cigarettes can deliver the nicotine when e-liquid is vaporized. Others need to simulate the “act of smoking” and attribute to habits and routines than have come accustomed to over the years. Has all the conclusive research been done? No. But people understand they are still inhaling “foreign substance” into the lung to satisfy their individual need. No matter how people perceive them the elimination of tobacco smoke is better for them and the public…but to what degree we shall still see when consensus studies are complete and conclusive.

    Robert Monroe
    Halo Cigs

  • Zinia Thomas
    31 May 2013

    Thanks Claire for share your views about e-cigarette I heard various news about e-cigarette but have no clear idea about this. I will help our society to recover from tobacco addiction.

  • Robert Reid
    31 May 2013

    Chris Price could not have put it better, he has covered all areas and all are poignant questions which need answers. There seems to be so much controversy and ambiguity surrounding the electronic cigarette, and this is because as Professor Britton has said “e-cigs can prevent deaths”. You cannot sit on the fence and argue that some e-liquids show that they have trace amounts of carcinogens in and need more testing…the proof is of the people who vape.

    My wife has been vaping for a year, after smoking 20 a day for 37 years. She has had breast cancer, she still smoked because of the stress. She tried NRT in all forms including hypnotherapy, none of which worked. She picked up her first e-cigarette on the 23rd June 2012 and has not touched another cigarette since. She feels the benefits absolutely, we also feel the benefits to our cashflow!

    Yes indeed, the tobacco companies have joined, but in every single article I have read about the tobacco companies, they have not once touched on how many lives could be saved or deaths prevented, I have however read their proposed market share and how many billions they hope to pocket in the forthcoming years! These are the people who have lied to us for generations, who have targeted children, who have targeted third world countries, they have no morals, no ethics, no integrity, no conscience and definitely no scruples. They will stop at nothing to ensure that their shareholders are kept happy. Will they dig into their very deep pockets though to carry out intense research? Will they dupe us all again and put in unnecessary ingredients in the e-liquids? As a vaper and as a owner of an e-cig company, I do not welcome their presence in this industry, nor do I know of any other vaper who would buy from them!

    Small independent companies have worked hard, done their research, crated action groups, we plough our money in for trials and testing, only to find that those who can not only keep the governments happy, they can line the pockets of the big pharma and keep a smile on the face of the World Health Organisation WHO’s pulling WHO’S strings here?

    I truly believe that the tobacco giants were the main protagonists in the war on e-cigarettes, the media coverage of them being unsafe, none of it worked and the tobacco companies were stuck between a rock and a hard place – they thought the e-cigarette was a fad and gimmick which would die out, but now the big boys are here to put us all in our places and make the world safe again! Ha, I really can’t keep my tongue in my cheek much longer!

    Rob Reid

  • Chris Price
    30 May 2013

    The success of consumer products such as e-cigarettes and Snus depend on (a) unhindered access to a full range of products unrestricted by unnecessary regulations, and (b) truthful information regarding the relative risks being given to consumers. You can see the effect of unhindered access to such products in Sweden, which is the world leader in the reduction of smoking prevalence and smoking morbidity and mortality. As the products have no more than normal consumer protections, which is all that is needed, and the health risks of Snus consumption are too low to detect by statistical methods, about 50% of Sweden’s smokers have switched; with the result that Sweden is the only country in the world with a realistic prospect of reducing smoking deaths to insignificant numbers (in about 3 years’ time, male smoking prevalence there will be at 5% – a number so phenomenally low it is utterly out of the question for any other developed country). As I’m sure you are aware, Sweden has the EU’s lowest rate of male lung cancer (and oral cancer). Now there is a country that is actually *doing* something about the problem.

    E-Cigarettes are likely to prove as safe as or safer than Snus. Already 7% of UK smokers have switched, and by 2020, or at the latest 2025, 25% of UK smokers will have switched. As Prof Britton of the RCP says, “If all UK smokers switched to e-cigarettes, five million lives would be saved just in those who are alive today”. What we are looking at here is the greatest advance in public health since the discovery of antibiotics.

    If you argue against this, you risk being placed in the same category as the US pseudo-health organisations that are clearly nothing more than front groups for the pharmaceutical industry.

    There is no such thing as ‘light-touch’ regulations. They will be operated by the pharmaceutical industry’s friends in government, with a view to crippling e-cigarettes as soon as possible. Since the UK is the only country in the world, as far as I am aware, where e-cigarettes are comprehensively and efficiently regulated, then asking for more than the 17 statutes they must currently comply with begs the question: whose side are you on? Public health or pharma? What are the serious incidents in the millions of user-years so far that need the implementation of even more strict regulations?

    I think that members of the public who donate to you in the hope of helping to prevent or cure cancer have the right to know that you appear to be working hard to promote it. Instead of promoting cancer by protecting the cigarette trade from competition, why not do something positive, and offer to assist the e-cigarette trade with laboratory testing and analysis?

    And please stop this innuendo linking the tobacco industry with the ecig trade; they started buying ecig firms last year, and have only recently become involved. 99.9% of e-cigarette firms are small businesses working hard to improve public health. How about assisting them in practical ways instead of attacking public health? How about doing something useful with your funds instead of using them to protect smoking and to benefit the pharmaceutical industry’s massive sales of chemotherapy drugs?

    If you call yourself a health organisation, then how about living up to the name instead of doing what looks very much like working to help big tobacco and big pharma?

    – Chris Price