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Cancer and Infections

Showing 5 out of 5 results
An image of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine

In the latest instalment of our cancer and infections series, we explore the history behind the cancer-causing human papillomavirus. In the latest instalment of our cancer and infections series, we explore the history behind the cancer-causing human papillomavirus.

by Emma Smith | Analysis | 16 September 2014

16 September 2014

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections

Concluding our story on Epstein-Barr virus and cancer, we explore the ongoing research into the virus and how this could lead to treatments in the future. Concluding our story on Epstein-Barr virus and cancer, we explore the ongoing research into the virus and how this could lead to treatments in the future.

by Emma Smith | Analysis | 9 April 2014

9 April 2014

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections
  • Health & Medicine

50 years of Epstein-Barr virus

50 years ago three scientists published their findings on the first human virus that can cause cancer - read the story of Epstein-Barr virus. 50 years ago three scientists published their findings on the first human virus that can cause cancer - read the story of Epstein-Barr virus.

by Emma Smith | Analysis | 26 March 2014

26 March 2014

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections
Helicobacter pylori

In the next in our Cancer and Infections series, we look at the stomach bug H. pylori and how it's linked with cancer. In the next in our Cancer and Infections series, we look at the stomach bug H. pylori and how it's linked with cancer.

by Emma Smith | Analysis | 7 March 2014

7 March 2014

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections
  • Science & Technology
  • Health & Medicine

The link between cancer and infections

Can you catch cancer? The answer is no, but you can pick up an infection that increases the chances of developing certain types. Can you catch cancer? The answer is no, but you can pick up an infection that increases the chances of developing certain types.

by Emma Smith | Analysis | 26 February 2014

26 February 2014

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Cancer and Infections