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The team of over 60 scientists investigating the age-old mystery of inflammation and cancer

We spoke to 3 members of the global STORMing Cancer team about their work to solve the mystery of inflammation and cancer.

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Searching for novel connections in cancer metabolism

Our scientists have been hunting for patterns that could reveals clues about metabolism and cancer.

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Tracing the toxic fingerprint of a bacterium in our gut 

Our Grand Challenge scientists have discovered that a common type of bacteria found in our guts could contribute to bowel cancer.

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Why do certain faulty genes only cause cancer in some parts of the body?

Our international team of scientists are tackling a fundamental question about how cancer develops: why do some gene faults only cause cancer in certain organs?

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Inflammation and cancer: unravelling a 150-year-old mystery

Inflammation can prevent infections and helps repair injuries. But for people with long-term inflammatory conditions, it can sometimes lead to cancer.

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Could the bacteria in our gut help treat cancer?

Gut bacteria may help some bowel cancers grow. Our Grand Challenge scientists want to see if tinkering with these tiny communities could be a new way to treat cancer.

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Stitching together a ‘Google Earth’ for cancer

Our scientists at the National Physical Laboratory are using their expertise in measurement to draw a new map of cancer.

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Meet the scientists taking on 3 of the biggest challenges in cancer research

Three new teams funded through our Grand Challenge are about to embark on research projects focusing on the microbiome, faulty genes and chronic inflammation.

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8 new challenges between us and beating cancer

We launch phase 2 of our Grand Challenge with 8 of the biggest questions in cancer research.

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Preventing unnecessary breast cancer treatment

Our scientists want to help doctors give women with DCIS a definitive answer on their individual risk of developing breast cancer. So they know, once and for all, if treatment is necessary.

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