Skip to main content

Together we are beating cancer

Donate now

Cancer biology

Showing 12 out of 392 results
Several disposable e-cigarettes in different colours

You may have seen media coverage of a study that looked at changes in different types of cells from people who smoked and people who vaped. Let's break down what the results really show. You may have seen media coverage of a study that looked at changes in different types of cells from people who smoked and people who vaped. Let's break down what the results really show.

by Julia Cotterill | Analysis | 20 March 2024

20 March 2024

Cancer cell dividing

Getting to grips with metastasis means understanding the evolutionary mechanisms behind this complex biology, says Dr Simone Zaccaria... Getting to grips with metastasis means understanding the evolutionary mechanisms behind this complex biology, says Dr Simone Zaccaria...

by Cancer Research UK | In depth | 27 February 2024

27 February 2024

Cells with nuclei in blue and mitochondria (energy factories) in green.

Our researchers have found mutations that make cancers much more likely to respond to immunotherapy. It's a chance to make breakthrough treatments work for many more people. Our researchers have found mutations that make cancers much more likely to respond to immunotherapy. It's a chance to make breakthrough treatments work for many more people.

by Tim Gunn | Analysis | 31 January 2024

31 January 2024

Breast cancer cells taken as part of a biopsy shown under the microscope

New research we've funded has found that breast cancers can break down molecules in their support system to use as a source of nutrients. As healthy cells can't use this chemical pathway to make food, it could lead to a new targeted breast cancer treatment. New research we've funded has found that breast cancers can break down molecules in their support system to use as a source of nutrients. As healthy cells can't use this chemical pathway to make food, it could lead to a new targeted breast cancer treatment.

by Jacob Smith | Analysis | 17 January 2024

17 January 2024

Antibody

Follow Sophia Karagiannis and James Spicer on an immunological adventure as they develop a ground-breaking new class of drug... Follow Sophia Karagiannis and James Spicer on an immunological adventure as they develop a ground-breaking new class of drug...

by Cancer Research UK | In depth | 12 December 2023

12 December 2023

Two cancer researchers looking at a cell image on screen

Each cancer is as unique as the person it affects. By studying patient data, we can target our treatments to people's specific needs. Each cancer is as unique as the person it affects. By studying patient data, we can target our treatments to people's specific needs.

by Cancer Research UK | In depth | 21 November 2023

21 November 2023

A mouse-eared bat flying out of a cave

Bats rarely get cancer. They also resist viruses that kill humans, and some don't even seem to age. Scientists think that it might have something to do with their ability to fly – and that we can copy some of their tricks. Bats rarely get cancer. They also resist viruses that kill humans, and some don't even seem to age. Scientists think that it might have something to do with their ability to fly – and that we can copy some of their tricks.

by Tim Gunn | Analysis | 31 October 2023

31 October 2023

Our first two Biology-Prevention awardees take us through their exciting work, and tell us why they think a biological approach to cancer prevention is so important… Our first two Biology-Prevention awardees take us through their exciting work, and tell us why they think a biological approach to cancer prevention is so important…

by Cancer Research UK | In depth | 30 October 2023

30 October 2023

Cancer cells with extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA)

Cancer Grand Challenges team eDyNAmiC has changed our understanding of how oesophageal cancer starts. In some cases, mutations scientists thought were a late effect of the disease could actually be driving it in the first place. The findings could give us a new way to intercept cancer before it becomes dangerous. Cancer Grand Challenges team eDyNAmiC has changed our understanding of how oesophageal cancer starts. In some cases, mutations scientists thought were a late effect of the disease could actually be driving it in the first place. The findings could give us a new way to intercept cancer before it becomes dangerous.

by Tim Gunn | In depth | 23 October 2023

23 October 2023

CRUK Scotland Institute

Today we announced our largest ever investment in Scotland of up to £123m as part of a seven-year commitment to the Cancer Research UK Scotland Institute Today we announced our largest ever investment in Scotland of up to £123m as part of a seven-year commitment to the Cancer Research UK Scotland Institute

by Amy Warnock | News | 20 September 2023

20 September 2023

Steph Phillips, Dr Miriam Dixon-Zegeye & Professor Sarah Blagden

We're funding the UK's first precision cancer prevention trial unit. It's testing a drug that could help protect people with Li Fraumeni Syndrome, a genetic condition that can lead to a more than 90% lifetime risk of cancer, against the disease. We're funding the UK's first precision cancer prevention trial unit. It's testing a drug that could help protect people with Li Fraumeni Syndrome, a genetic condition that can lead to a more than 90% lifetime risk of cancer, against the disease.

by Tim Gunn | In depth | 19 September 2023

19 September 2023