Together we are beating cancer

Donate now

Cancer spread (metastasis)

Showing 12 out of 106 results
Two cancer researchers looking at a cell image on screen

Each cancer is as unique as the person it affects. By studying patient data, we can target our treatments to people's specific needs. Each cancer is as unique as the person it affects. By studying patient data, we can target our treatments to people's specific needs.

by Cancer Research UK | In depth | 21 November 2023

21 November 2023

Bowel cancer cells under the microscope

FOCUS4 was a large-scale trial investigating new treatments in people with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. Running it may not have been without its challenges, but the learnings it provided us with are invaluable if we're to run trials like it again.  FOCUS4 was a large-scale trial investigating new treatments in people with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. Running it may not have been without its challenges, but the learnings it provided us with are invaluable if we're to run trials like it again. 

by Jacob Smith | In depth | 25 April 2023

25 April 2023

We spoke to Mariam Jamal-Hanjani and asked her to reflect on a career embedded in large-scale, collaborative and ambitious projects…    We spoke to Mariam Jamal-Hanjani and asked her to reflect on a career embedded in large-scale, collaborative and ambitious projects…   

by Phil Prime | In depth | 10 March 2023

10 March 2023

A breast cancer cell seen through a special microscope.
  • Science & Technology

Can cancer cells communicate?

Cancer cells use electricity to help them spread. A new study shows it might be key to controlling their other behaviours, too. Cancer cells use electricity to help them spread. A new study shows it might be key to controlling their other behaviours, too.

by Tim Gunn | Analysis | 28 February 2023

28 February 2023

A 3D illustration of cancer cells

Research from our Cambridge Institute has shown us that metastasis isn’t a process unique to cancer, revolutionising the way we think about cell dissemination.  Research from our Cambridge Institute has shown us that metastasis isn’t a process unique to cancer, revolutionising the way we think about cell dissemination. 

by Jacob Smith | Analysis | 18 October 2022

18 October 2022

A prostate cancer cell.

NICE does not recommend olaparib (Lynparza) for people with a type of advanced prostate cancer, as the treatment is not deemed cost-effective NICE does not recommend olaparib (Lynparza) for people with a type of advanced prostate cancer, as the treatment is not deemed cost-effective

by Jacob Smith | News | 13 September 2022

13 September 2022

Epithelial cels
  • For Researchers
  • Science & Technology

How cancer hijacks cell death: a new view of metastasis

Professor Jody Rosenblatt tells us why dysregulated cell death could have an impact not only on metastasis, but also therapy resistance. Professor Jody Rosenblatt tells us why dysregulated cell death could have an impact not only on metastasis, but also therapy resistance.

by Cancer Research UK | Research Feature | 17 September 2021

17 September 2021

A snapshot of a single mouse skin cancer cell as it slides along a petri dish.

Our scientists at the Beatson Institute are using powerful microscopes to zoom in on how cancer cells move. Our scientists at the Beatson Institute are using powerful microscopes to zoom in on how cancer cells move.

by Rupal Mistry | Analysis | 16 March 2020

16 March 2020

This entry is part 29 of 30 in the series Science Snaps
Cancer-associated fibroblasts stained to reveal their DNA (blue) and structural proteins (red).

Scientists are intercepting conversations between supporting cells and blood vessels that could help cancer spread. Scientists are intercepting conversations between supporting cells and blood vessels that could help cancer spread.

by Harry Jenkins | Analysis | 24 January 2020

24 January 2020

This entry is part 28 of 30 in the series Science Snaps
Lung cancer cells

There are many unanswered questions about how and why cancer spreads around the body. But one thing we do know is that only some cancers metastasise. There are many unanswered questions about how and why cancer spreads around the body. But one thing we do know is that only some cancers metastasise.

by Kerry Noble | Analysis | 26 November 2019

26 November 2019

This entry is part 20 of 23 in the series Science Surgery
Lung cancer cells

New lung cancer research shows that detecting potential tumour cells leaving the vein in the lung at surgery may predict the diseases return. New lung cancer research shows that detecting potential tumour cells leaving the vein in the lung at surgery may predict the diseases return.

by Gabriella Beer | Analysis | 7 October 2019

7 October 2019