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Prostate cancer

Around 47,700 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK each year, making it the most common cancer in men in the UK. It develops in the prostate, a walnut-sized gland found at the base of the bladder.
Showing 12 out of 230 results
Doctor discussing a prostate scan with a patient

An experimental hormone therapy delays the spread of prostate cancer that has stopped responding to standard treatment, according to new clinical trial results. An experimental hormone therapy delays the spread of prostate cancer that has stopped responding to standard treatment, according to new clinical trial results.

by Cancer Research UK | News | 9 February 2018

9 February 2018

Prostate cancer patients may base choice of hospital for surgery on availability of new technology, rather than hospital quality information, according to study Prostate cancer patients may base choice of hospital for surgery on availability of new technology, rather than hospital quality information, according to study

by Cancer Research UK | News | 4 October 2017

4 October 2017

A prostate cancer cell.

Unpublished results from the Cancer Research UK-funded STAMPEDE trial show that two different treatments improve survival in men with advanced prostate cancer. Unpublished results from the Cancer Research UK-funded STAMPEDE trial show that two different treatments improve survival in men with advanced prostate cancer.

by Cancer Research UK | News | 8 September 2017

8 September 2017

Physicists in Cambridge are using light and sound to gather information on prostate cancer in mice. This could show doctors how aggressive a tumour is. Physicists in Cambridge are using light and sound to gather information on prostate cancer in mice. This could show doctors how aggressive a tumour is.

by Gabriella Beer | Analysis | 24 August 2017

24 August 2017

Cancer Research UK logo

A new imaging technique uncovers oxygen levels in prostate tumours and could lead to a non-invasive way to determine which tumours are more difficult to treat. A new imaging technique uncovers oxygen levels in prostate tumours and could lead to a non-invasive way to determine which tumours are more difficult to treat.

by Cancer Research UK | News | 24 August 2017

24 August 2017