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Artificial intelligence could help breast screening save more lives

by Gabriella Beer | Analysis

1 January 2020

63 comments 63 comments

Doctor reviewing a mammogram

Right now, the NHS breast cancer screening programme saves around 1,300 lives in the UK each year.

But there are severe NHS staff shortages, particularly in the teams that help diagnose cancer,  with some reports suggesting that up to 1 in 10 diagnostic posts are currently vacant. Throw  in rising demand to the mix , and the future of these services could be in trouble. 

But new technology could help ease the situation. We’ve partnered with Google Health on research to develop artificial intelligence that not only has the potential to change the way we detect breast cancer but could also save the NHS time and money.  

Helping to train a computer 

Our scientists have created a database of anonymised breast cancer scans (mammograms) that have come from breast screening appointments at a number of  NHS breast screening centres around the UK, to be used for research.

Containing over 2.5 million images, this database is the largest and most dynamic of its kind in the world. And it’s available for academic and commercial partners to use, if they have a smart and scientifically sound research proposal that will benefit patients. But before they get access, their proposal is scrutinized by a group of experts, including people affected by cancer.  

That’s where Google Health comes in. Five years ago, Google and researchers from Imperial College London approached our team with a belief that a fancy computer programme could be developed and trained to spot cancer on mammograms.

“Basically, they were trying to teach a machine to read images and it takes an awful lot of images for it to learn so it can get really good at picking up cancer,” says Helen, a member of the group Independent Cancer Patients’ Voice, that brings together patient advocates to help with medical research. She reviewed Google Health’s application to access the database.

Computers with AI capabilities are only as good as the data they’ve been trained on, so for her, our mammogram collection and Google’s technology prowess were a winning combination. 

Results from this mighty research collaboration, published in Nature, show that the learning paid off. The AI software was able to correctly identify cancers in screening images with a similar degree of accuracy as the experts. The computer programme also reduced the number of errors, including cases where cancer is flagged incorrectly or those that are missed altogether. 

Currently, 2 experts review breast screening scans. But the system isn’t perfect, as screening can miss some cancers and pick up ones that wouldn’t have gone on to cause problems.

“It now looks from this research that having the combination of a human eye and a machine eye over the images could actually give more accurate results,” says Helen. She is referring to the study’s finding that AI reduced false positive results. These are ‘false alarms’ that can occur when someone gets an abnormal result, but they don’t have cancer. 

“That will reduce loads of anxiety for women,” says Helen, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004 and finished reconstruction surgery in 2014. It will also save the NHS time and money by reducing the number of patients who are called back for further tests. 

Artificial intelligence in a real scenario

Professor Ken Young works for the NHS and manages our mammogram collection. He and his colleagues helped Google Health analyse the data and design the trial to make it the most realistic AI study in breast cancer detection to date. 

“What I think is most interesting about this study is its realism,” says Young. “What’s unusual is that it compares the algorithm to a totally realistic clinical scenario.” 

Past studies have used specially selected mammograms that were analysed in a somewhat artificial setting. For example, some other programmes have been tested on a set of images that have more cancer cases than would be found in the general population. 

But in the latest study, researchers compared real decisions made by radiologists analysing the scans of people attending the NHS breast screening programme. 

“We have a sample that is representative of all the women that might come through breast screening,” says Young. “It includes easy cases, difficult cases and everything in between.” 

And thanks to this collaboration, the data set is even richer than it was before. Around 100,000 more normal cases have been added to the database, which are now available to other researchers using the scan collection.  

Giving the gift of time 

NHS staff could also benefit from the partnership. A recent review suggested that this kind of tech will give radiologists ‘the gift of time’, instead of replacing them.

“All the radiologists I know aren’t worried about AI at all,” says Young. “I think they’d be delighted to have some of the quite monotonous work of reading mammograms done for them, so they’re freed up to do other things.” 

Keeping patient data safe

The other concern when it comes to developing AI software is data protection, something that Young, Helen and the team have carefully thought through.

“One of the concerns that comes through is patient confidentiality,” says Helen, who has taken part in trials herself. “It’s very important that I sit there on the lay side to make certain that everything is anonymised, and the ethics are checked.”

Before images enter the database, they’re immediately de-identified so there is no way that a researcher can find out who the mammograms belong to. The scans don’t include any personal information, which is “stripped out before we add the image to the database and share it with researchers,” says Young.

And research groups who are granted access to the images also have to agree to certain conditions, like keeping the patient data confidential and not using it for any other purpose than the development of AI screening algorithms.

AI still has a lot to learn

This well-trained algorithm is still in its early stages, but now has a firm foundation of knowledge to build on. Next the team need to test on a wider population and to see how radiologists can benefit from using the algorithm in the clinic. 

“I genuinely think the potential here is enormous,” says Young. “Breast cancer screening has a number of problems that could be tackled by the introduction of artificial intelligence.”

“These early studies using AI are the beginning of something quite big that will revolutionise medicine, this is just one of the first examples.” 

Gabi 


    Comments

  • Jenny Fray
    3 June 2020

    That’s amazing. I am having surgery tomorrow for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ picked up at routine screening. Fabulous news that this can be caught at the right time.

  • Kim Hogan
    6 May 2020

    If it helps with getting a better results
    I had a lump and thought it was because I had lost weight then put a bit back on I had lost a lot of breast with weight loss but was called for a routine mammogram after the test come back clear I just thought it was fat so thought nothing about it. But when the lump seem to be still there I thought it best to go to the doctors to get it checked out and it was cancer so if I’d had the test done by computer maybe It would have picked it up

  • Gloria ortiz
    4 April 2020

    Bery good. God bless

  • Tracey Hicks
    3 April 2020

    Our mum died at 58 so I have done the race for life several times, so as long as it’s done properly I’m all for it

  • Jill Sykes
    3 April 2020

    Very informative – good

  • Sharon Hall
    16 March 2020

    Good

  • Irene Coyle
    7 March 2020

    I did race for life life last year with my sister & friend. Have done for many yrs off and on .but last got no letter saying thanks for support .my 2 sisters have had lung cancer 1 survived.my dad mum cousin have also passed to this disease
    I found amount I’d raised in a spam folder .which caused me a lot of annoyance.as you can imagine. My sister and friend received no contact as well .l know in scheme of things this
    All sounds pretty.but my work friends had also donated to help make target
    So I’m dissatisfied. Sorry for rant

  • Sharyn Tulloch
    4 March 2020

    If this method of screening proves useful and sucessful in saving the lives of more women, then I strongly support the research and its findings. Lets hope for government funding to continue to pilot this work.

  • Dave Richards
    3 March 2020

    I think what your planning /doing is superb. However I am a pensioner and already pay out a monthly sum to Hospice. That along with grand children leaves little to take on further tasks. First class, I also agree it’s a way forward. Keep going. Dave

  • Heather Appleyard
    3 March 2020

    I think this will benefit a lot of people and to save life’s will be amazing

  • Ari Aziz
    2 March 2020

    Great news

  • Maureen George
    2 March 2020

    I’m 73 now and have had cancer twice. Bowel and thyroid. I’m fit as a flea. And I intend to live a very long time 👍

  • Taiwo Ogunbiyi
    2 March 2020

    This will improve quality of life. Also will save lives. My Husband died of Brain Cancer and this happened very fast. Over 3 y ears. and I can never get over it

  • Natasha Morey
    2 March 2020

    How old u got be to be tested for breast cancer cause my fiance got stage 3 lung cancer tumour on his lung

  • Susan Barrett
    2 March 2020

    Think it sounds a really good idea hopefully it won’t be to long before it’s in operation having been through this 5 years ago anything that can free staff to do more important work is brilliant they do an amazing job

  • Cherie
    2 March 2020

    Sounds fantastic spotting things early saves lives as we know do good luck with technology if you need volunteers I think a lot of people would offer their breast to help you test x

  • Harvi
    2 March 2020

    Great news , it will save life lives.
    I have lost 2 friends , and have another one suffering from cancer .
    Amazing work by CRUK

  • Kay Harcourt
    2 March 2020

    Brilliant news as any help to early detection can only be positive

  • Carole Gammans
    2 March 2020

    Great anything that can help amazing

  • Kay Silvester
    2 March 2020

    I think Ai will be amazing. As long as all the rules and regulations are abided by and aĺ info kept secure.

  • Linda A Holland
    2 March 2020

    If this computer truly helps to aid human diagnostic then it could be good. I have just had my mammogram and is reported as normal.

  • Janet heath
    2 March 2020

    Great news we needed more accurate results
    You’re doing a great job

  • Saf
    2 March 2020

    I think it’s absolutly amazing the intelligence to do this and I hope everyone dealing with cancer carry’s on trying and pushing because everything is possible and this will be possible

  • Jean Bender
    2 March 2020

    Good work ,keep it up.

  • Jean
    2 March 2020

    Keep it up !!

  • Jackie Arigho
    2 March 2020

    Excellent idea

  • Patrícia
    2 March 2020

    Please use my data. Thank you so much for your great work.

  • Maureen Molloy
    2 March 2020

    Brilliant agree that’s it bringing technology up to date

  • Shazia
    2 March 2020

    Brilliant idea

  • Doreen Pragnell
    2 March 2020

    It’s brilliant news for breast cancer patients, I am one of those patients going through treatment at the moment. All the staff do a brilliant job. This machine hopefully will safe the NHS a lot of time and money and patience will benefit from this.

  • Diane cross
    2 March 2020

    I think that’s amazing the sooner it’s up and running the better

  • Mrs Donna Noble
    2 March 2020

    I think this is amazing it is bringing technology into the 20th century & it is great freeing up time for other things to be carried out

  • Christine Farrar
    2 March 2020

    It’s sound’s brilliant onwards an upwards

  • Rosemarie
    2 March 2020

    Great to hear what is going on with these updates with having 2 member of family with cancer good luck 🤗

  • Wendy
    2 March 2020

    This is good news. The more technology there is the more tests for breast cancer screening

  • Daphne
    2 March 2020

    Great news

  • Robert Oag
    27 February 2020

    Sounds really gòod work.

    The data presumably has other circumstantial data associated with it to be of use in the analysis.of type etc

  • Louise Reilly
    26 February 2020

    Sounds amazing! Onwards and upwards!

  • Julia Basset
    25 February 2020

    This is wonderful news.maybe then women from 25 years old onwards can have regular mammographies.so important to start these at an earlier age,

  • Miss Catherine OBRIEN
    24 February 2020

    Brill news for cancer research

  • Shirley Clancy
    24 February 2020

    Very interesting and intriguing.

  • Sue Ashton
    24 February 2020

    Great news, anything that saves time and money, is accurate and can help save lives must be a good thing.

  • Greg
    24 February 2020

    I don’t think the word ‘anonymised’ should be used. It misleads people into believing data is anonymous when it isn’t.
    And surely more than just images are past to Google as well? It isn’t going to learn by just having an image – surely some other data is passed to them too?
    Are patients advised that their data/images are being used for research?
    Are patients’ wishes respected if they don’t want to participate?

  • reply
    Katie Roberts
    3 March 2020

    Hi Greg,

    Thanks for your question about the data being used in this study. The OPTIMAM Mammography Image Database contains digital mammograms. Typically, these are for women who have had a screen detected breast cancer and contain two views of each breast (medio-lateral oblique and cranio-caudal). The locations of the cancer are marked and additional clinical information including radiological appearance, pathology and screening history is stored in the database. In addition to these cancer cases, a representative sample of normal and benign cases are also available.

    All of the information in the database is anonymised and the process for collecting the images and data is automated.

    The primary purpose for collecting the data was for the OPTIMAM research programmes, which evaluate how various factors affect cancer detection using mammographic images. But the database is also available to other researchers if their application is approved.

    The database is accessed by a web portal with restricted levels of access depending on the user. A number of research groups have been allowed access to the images and data to develop artificial intelligence algorithms for computer aided breast cancer detection and risk classification. The database has in excess of 2 million images and continues to expand as new cases are added.

    Best wishes,

    Katie, Cancer Research UK

  • Muriel Gillespie
    23 February 2020

    I think we are starting to realize it is very beneficial for human beings and computers can work together for good. This is great research!

  • Mr Judge
    23 February 2020

    The use of technology like AI is just whats needed, however I think the data needs to be further verified to make sure that a negative screen result didn’t turnout positive because something was misinterpreted, so patient records need to be double checked. A computer programme is only as good as the data that as been input.
    I do think that the mammogram machine needs modifying something like computer arms to be used to take 3 D imaging instead of pressing the breast between two plates, therefore create breast cup that can be adjusted in size to suit the breast and the cup is then place around the breast then the x-ray is taken.
    My wife had a recurrence of breast cancer after 20 + years and 12 months previous her mammogram was negative, 12 months later she found a lump that was positive, she was devastated

  • Linda roust
    23 February 2020

    Any improvement in detection is always a winner now for a cure!

  • Isobel Armstrong
    23 February 2020

    I think this is wonderful news ! This is definitely the way forward and is reassuring for women of all ages. Huge thanks to Prof Young and everyone involved !!

  • Mrs Dawn Asplen
    23 February 2020

    I think this is fantastic news and anything that improves breast screening gets the thumbs up from me it is good to know that it can save more lives especially save money from the NHS and time fantastic e mail cancer research UK you are fantastic my breast cancer was found by me having a ct scan for having a chest infection if hadn’t of been for a general practitioner I would have never know I had got breast cancer I have had a mastectomy and 6 weeks of radiotherapy, now I have lymphoedema and emphysema maybe if I would have had this it would have been picked up earlier I’m on anastrazole medication and have gone 2 yrs in remission only have 3 more to go then 6 without medication I am trying to stay positive but it is very hard as I’m 65 and have lots of my friends that have secondary breast cancer just hope that I get the absolute clear only time will tell

  • Yvonne Smith
    23 February 2020

    I found this article interesting in the new developments in breast cancer as I had this disease myself a few years ago and follow information on this particular cancer with interest.

  • Dori-Anne Finlay
    23 February 2020

    Brilliant idea in using more modern technology

  • Wendy Robins
    22 February 2020

    This has great potential to assist in diagnosis but we must make sure that having helped Google with this technology that we are not held ransom by their copyright and costs in the future. Joint copyright must be essential when our NHS data is handed over to private companies.

  • JANET WALLIS
    22 February 2020

    Having suffered from Stage 3 breast cancer HER2 Positive I think anything especially this type of cancer detection is a great step forward

  • Linda A Brett
    22 February 2020

    Very thorough report, easy to understand and very informative. The future of AI is promising a great move forward for the Doctors and Scientists in the NHS.

  • Patricia Deakin
    22 February 2020

    Excellent. Anything that can help breast cancer get detected sooner or more accurately would be wonderful. Earlier beast screening would be very beneficial. My daughter died of breast cancer at the age of 36 in 2005. I was diagnosed in 2017 but have made a good recovery. Things have definitely improved.

  • Ruth
    21 February 2020

    Can’t you change the way mammograms are done in the first place? It’s SO PAINFUL/UNCOMFORTABLE to hv to shove one’s boob between the ‘plates’ even for a few seconds… 😥😥😥 surely in this day and age of technology someone cd design a nicer machine…. That also goes for cervical smears HORRENDOUS!! Worst thing that’s ever happened to me (or NOT, as it’s too painful to go through).

  • sheila pugh
    21 February 2020

    Very interesting.

  • Julie Walker
    21 February 2020

    Wonderful news! It is very reassuring to know that this level of research is going on. From a personal point of view, now that I am 63 years old, I hope that this might mean that women of my age can still get some form of breast screening.

  • Mary Townsend
    21 February 2020

    I think this is a wonderful break through using A.I.to detect cancers in the breast,& a wonderful help to the radiologists. It’s definitely the thing of the future in medicine & many other areas. With the dedicated work of the research team i’m sure a cure for cancer is that not too far away!

  • Mary Townsend
    21 February 2020

    I think this is a wonderful break through using A.I.to detect cancers in the breast,& a wonderful help to the radiologists. It’s definitely the thing of the future in medicine & many other areas. With the dedicated work of the research team i’m sure a cure for cancer is not too far away!

  • Elaine
    21 February 2020

    Fab

  • Tracy
    20 February 2020

    It is both reassuring and inspiring to know that so much work, time and effort is going in to help fight this awful disease. Huge thanks for all that you are doing.

  • Carol
    20 February 2020

    The concept is amazing. Another big step forward for science in tackling cancer.

  • Louise
    5 February 2020

    This is great news , another fantastic tool in the fight against cancer – keep up the great work, it is much needed and much valued, thank you so much x

    Comments

  • Jenny Fray
    3 June 2020

    That’s amazing. I am having surgery tomorrow for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ picked up at routine screening. Fabulous news that this can be caught at the right time.

  • Kim Hogan
    6 May 2020

    If it helps with getting a better results
    I had a lump and thought it was because I had lost weight then put a bit back on I had lost a lot of breast with weight loss but was called for a routine mammogram after the test come back clear I just thought it was fat so thought nothing about it. But when the lump seem to be still there I thought it best to go to the doctors to get it checked out and it was cancer so if I’d had the test done by computer maybe It would have picked it up

  • Gloria ortiz
    4 April 2020

    Bery good. God bless

  • Tracey Hicks
    3 April 2020

    Our mum died at 58 so I have done the race for life several times, so as long as it’s done properly I’m all for it

  • Jill Sykes
    3 April 2020

    Very informative – good

  • Sharon Hall
    16 March 2020

    Good

  • Irene Coyle
    7 March 2020

    I did race for life life last year with my sister & friend. Have done for many yrs off and on .but last got no letter saying thanks for support .my 2 sisters have had lung cancer 1 survived.my dad mum cousin have also passed to this disease
    I found amount I’d raised in a spam folder .which caused me a lot of annoyance.as you can imagine. My sister and friend received no contact as well .l know in scheme of things this
    All sounds pretty.but my work friends had also donated to help make target
    So I’m dissatisfied. Sorry for rant

  • Sharyn Tulloch
    4 March 2020

    If this method of screening proves useful and sucessful in saving the lives of more women, then I strongly support the research and its findings. Lets hope for government funding to continue to pilot this work.

  • Dave Richards
    3 March 2020

    I think what your planning /doing is superb. However I am a pensioner and already pay out a monthly sum to Hospice. That along with grand children leaves little to take on further tasks. First class, I also agree it’s a way forward. Keep going. Dave

  • Heather Appleyard
    3 March 2020

    I think this will benefit a lot of people and to save life’s will be amazing

  • Ari Aziz
    2 March 2020

    Great news

  • Maureen George
    2 March 2020

    I’m 73 now and have had cancer twice. Bowel and thyroid. I’m fit as a flea. And I intend to live a very long time 👍

  • Taiwo Ogunbiyi
    2 March 2020

    This will improve quality of life. Also will save lives. My Husband died of Brain Cancer and this happened very fast. Over 3 y ears. and I can never get over it

  • Natasha Morey
    2 March 2020

    How old u got be to be tested for breast cancer cause my fiance got stage 3 lung cancer tumour on his lung

  • Susan Barrett
    2 March 2020

    Think it sounds a really good idea hopefully it won’t be to long before it’s in operation having been through this 5 years ago anything that can free staff to do more important work is brilliant they do an amazing job

  • Cherie
    2 March 2020

    Sounds fantastic spotting things early saves lives as we know do good luck with technology if you need volunteers I think a lot of people would offer their breast to help you test x

  • Harvi
    2 March 2020

    Great news , it will save life lives.
    I have lost 2 friends , and have another one suffering from cancer .
    Amazing work by CRUK

  • Kay Harcourt
    2 March 2020

    Brilliant news as any help to early detection can only be positive

  • Carole Gammans
    2 March 2020

    Great anything that can help amazing

  • Kay Silvester
    2 March 2020

    I think Ai will be amazing. As long as all the rules and regulations are abided by and aĺ info kept secure.

  • Linda A Holland
    2 March 2020

    If this computer truly helps to aid human diagnostic then it could be good. I have just had my mammogram and is reported as normal.

  • Janet heath
    2 March 2020

    Great news we needed more accurate results
    You’re doing a great job

  • Saf
    2 March 2020

    I think it’s absolutly amazing the intelligence to do this and I hope everyone dealing with cancer carry’s on trying and pushing because everything is possible and this will be possible

  • Jean Bender
    2 March 2020

    Good work ,keep it up.

  • Jean
    2 March 2020

    Keep it up !!

  • Jackie Arigho
    2 March 2020

    Excellent idea

  • Patrícia
    2 March 2020

    Please use my data. Thank you so much for your great work.

  • Maureen Molloy
    2 March 2020

    Brilliant agree that’s it bringing technology up to date

  • Shazia
    2 March 2020

    Brilliant idea

  • Doreen Pragnell
    2 March 2020

    It’s brilliant news for breast cancer patients, I am one of those patients going through treatment at the moment. All the staff do a brilliant job. This machine hopefully will safe the NHS a lot of time and money and patience will benefit from this.

  • Diane cross
    2 March 2020

    I think that’s amazing the sooner it’s up and running the better

  • Mrs Donna Noble
    2 March 2020

    I think this is amazing it is bringing technology into the 20th century & it is great freeing up time for other things to be carried out

  • Christine Farrar
    2 March 2020

    It’s sound’s brilliant onwards an upwards

  • Rosemarie
    2 March 2020

    Great to hear what is going on with these updates with having 2 member of family with cancer good luck 🤗

  • Wendy
    2 March 2020

    This is good news. The more technology there is the more tests for breast cancer screening

  • Daphne
    2 March 2020

    Great news

  • Robert Oag
    27 February 2020

    Sounds really gòod work.

    The data presumably has other circumstantial data associated with it to be of use in the analysis.of type etc

  • Louise Reilly
    26 February 2020

    Sounds amazing! Onwards and upwards!

  • Julia Basset
    25 February 2020

    This is wonderful news.maybe then women from 25 years old onwards can have regular mammographies.so important to start these at an earlier age,

  • Miss Catherine OBRIEN
    24 February 2020

    Brill news for cancer research

  • Shirley Clancy
    24 February 2020

    Very interesting and intriguing.

  • Sue Ashton
    24 February 2020

    Great news, anything that saves time and money, is accurate and can help save lives must be a good thing.

  • Greg
    24 February 2020

    I don’t think the word ‘anonymised’ should be used. It misleads people into believing data is anonymous when it isn’t.
    And surely more than just images are past to Google as well? It isn’t going to learn by just having an image – surely some other data is passed to them too?
    Are patients advised that their data/images are being used for research?
    Are patients’ wishes respected if they don’t want to participate?

  • reply
    Katie Roberts
    3 March 2020

    Hi Greg,

    Thanks for your question about the data being used in this study. The OPTIMAM Mammography Image Database contains digital mammograms. Typically, these are for women who have had a screen detected breast cancer and contain two views of each breast (medio-lateral oblique and cranio-caudal). The locations of the cancer are marked and additional clinical information including radiological appearance, pathology and screening history is stored in the database. In addition to these cancer cases, a representative sample of normal and benign cases are also available.

    All of the information in the database is anonymised and the process for collecting the images and data is automated.

    The primary purpose for collecting the data was for the OPTIMAM research programmes, which evaluate how various factors affect cancer detection using mammographic images. But the database is also available to other researchers if their application is approved.

    The database is accessed by a web portal with restricted levels of access depending on the user. A number of research groups have been allowed access to the images and data to develop artificial intelligence algorithms for computer aided breast cancer detection and risk classification. The database has in excess of 2 million images and continues to expand as new cases are added.

    Best wishes,

    Katie, Cancer Research UK

  • Muriel Gillespie
    23 February 2020

    I think we are starting to realize it is very beneficial for human beings and computers can work together for good. This is great research!

  • Mr Judge
    23 February 2020

    The use of technology like AI is just whats needed, however I think the data needs to be further verified to make sure that a negative screen result didn’t turnout positive because something was misinterpreted, so patient records need to be double checked. A computer programme is only as good as the data that as been input.
    I do think that the mammogram machine needs modifying something like computer arms to be used to take 3 D imaging instead of pressing the breast between two plates, therefore create breast cup that can be adjusted in size to suit the breast and the cup is then place around the breast then the x-ray is taken.
    My wife had a recurrence of breast cancer after 20 + years and 12 months previous her mammogram was negative, 12 months later she found a lump that was positive, she was devastated

  • Linda roust
    23 February 2020

    Any improvement in detection is always a winner now for a cure!

  • Isobel Armstrong
    23 February 2020

    I think this is wonderful news ! This is definitely the way forward and is reassuring for women of all ages. Huge thanks to Prof Young and everyone involved !!

  • Mrs Dawn Asplen
    23 February 2020

    I think this is fantastic news and anything that improves breast screening gets the thumbs up from me it is good to know that it can save more lives especially save money from the NHS and time fantastic e mail cancer research UK you are fantastic my breast cancer was found by me having a ct scan for having a chest infection if hadn’t of been for a general practitioner I would have never know I had got breast cancer I have had a mastectomy and 6 weeks of radiotherapy, now I have lymphoedema and emphysema maybe if I would have had this it would have been picked up earlier I’m on anastrazole medication and have gone 2 yrs in remission only have 3 more to go then 6 without medication I am trying to stay positive but it is very hard as I’m 65 and have lots of my friends that have secondary breast cancer just hope that I get the absolute clear only time will tell

  • Yvonne Smith
    23 February 2020

    I found this article interesting in the new developments in breast cancer as I had this disease myself a few years ago and follow information on this particular cancer with interest.

  • Dori-Anne Finlay
    23 February 2020

    Brilliant idea in using more modern technology

  • Wendy Robins
    22 February 2020

    This has great potential to assist in diagnosis but we must make sure that having helped Google with this technology that we are not held ransom by their copyright and costs in the future. Joint copyright must be essential when our NHS data is handed over to private companies.

  • JANET WALLIS
    22 February 2020

    Having suffered from Stage 3 breast cancer HER2 Positive I think anything especially this type of cancer detection is a great step forward

  • Linda A Brett
    22 February 2020

    Very thorough report, easy to understand and very informative. The future of AI is promising a great move forward for the Doctors and Scientists in the NHS.

  • Patricia Deakin
    22 February 2020

    Excellent. Anything that can help breast cancer get detected sooner or more accurately would be wonderful. Earlier beast screening would be very beneficial. My daughter died of breast cancer at the age of 36 in 2005. I was diagnosed in 2017 but have made a good recovery. Things have definitely improved.

  • Ruth
    21 February 2020

    Can’t you change the way mammograms are done in the first place? It’s SO PAINFUL/UNCOMFORTABLE to hv to shove one’s boob between the ‘plates’ even for a few seconds… 😥😥😥 surely in this day and age of technology someone cd design a nicer machine…. That also goes for cervical smears HORRENDOUS!! Worst thing that’s ever happened to me (or NOT, as it’s too painful to go through).

  • sheila pugh
    21 February 2020

    Very interesting.

  • Julie Walker
    21 February 2020

    Wonderful news! It is very reassuring to know that this level of research is going on. From a personal point of view, now that I am 63 years old, I hope that this might mean that women of my age can still get some form of breast screening.

  • Mary Townsend
    21 February 2020

    I think this is a wonderful break through using A.I.to detect cancers in the breast,& a wonderful help to the radiologists. It’s definitely the thing of the future in medicine & many other areas. With the dedicated work of the research team i’m sure a cure for cancer is that not too far away!

  • Mary Townsend
    21 February 2020

    I think this is a wonderful break through using A.I.to detect cancers in the breast,& a wonderful help to the radiologists. It’s definitely the thing of the future in medicine & many other areas. With the dedicated work of the research team i’m sure a cure for cancer is not too far away!

  • Elaine
    21 February 2020

    Fab

  • Tracy
    20 February 2020

    It is both reassuring and inspiring to know that so much work, time and effort is going in to help fight this awful disease. Huge thanks for all that you are doing.

  • Carol
    20 February 2020

    The concept is amazing. Another big step forward for science in tackling cancer.

  • Louise
    5 February 2020

    This is great news , another fantastic tool in the fight against cancer – keep up the great work, it is much needed and much valued, thank you so much x